World War II

Courtesy of the Alvarado family

Francisco Chapa Alvarado was living in northern Mexico in 1943 when he received a draft notice from his native U.S. Alvarado, who had moved to Mexico with his young family a few years earlier, came home and took up arms.

His 75-year-old son, Felix Alvarado, wonders why his father returned.

Courtesy of the Bullock Texas State History Museum

From Texas Standard:

Adolf Hitler said "Make the lie big, make it simple, keep saying it, and eventually they will believe it."

Many historians agree that one of Hitler's most dangerous weapons was his words. With the help of Reich Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's words mobilized anger, anti-Semitism, homophobia and white supremacy, fueling a political machine that began one of the world's largest wars.

When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, "You're not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor."

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

Seventy-five years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, some Americans have never stopped believing that President Franklin Roosevelt let it happen in order to draw the U.S. into World War II.

"It's ridiculous," says Rob Citino, a senior researcher at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. "But it's evergreen. It never stops. My students, over 30 years — there'd always be someone in class [who'd say], 'Roosevelt knew all about it.'"

Courtesy of Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez

­It was morning on June 5, 1942. My father was in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, when the Japanese fighter and bomber planes made their first pass.  


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