Trump Signs Funding Bill, Bringing Shutdown To An End

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET President Trump has signed a stopgap spending bill passed by Congress on Monday, ending the partial shutdown of the federal government after three days. The White House has said normal government operations will resume by Tuesday morning. The bill passed the Senate on Monday afternoon with a 81-18 vote, but the real hurdle was the procedural vote earlier in the day requiring at least 60 votes. That's where the measure hit a snafu late Friday night, triggering the...

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The state of Texas owns a bunch of land. That's because, in case you didn't know, we used to be our own country and joined the United States without the need for a land grant from the Feds.

All that land needs someone – and an office – to look after it.

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump promised abortion opponents four specific actions to "advance the rights of unborn children and their mothers."

One year into his presidency, three of those items remain undone. Nevertheless, opponents of abortion have made significant progress in changing the direction of federal and state policies.

Dallas County Republicans have filed a lawsuit to remove 128 Democratic candidates from the March 6 primary ballot. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Texas Legislature writes the state budget. The governor signs it into law. But with a single action, the Texas comptroller can kill the entire appropriations process.

But before we get to that, let's start with the real burning issue: How do you pronounce comptroller? Do you pronounce it controller or comptroller?

The name, job description and spelling originally come from England. The full title there is Comptroller General of the Receipt and Issue of Her Majesty's Exchequer and Auditor General of Public Accounts.

The StoryCorps mobile booth is in Austin this month, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that are being recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday and Wednesday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Tu Russo was born in Saigon, Vietnam, in 1964, during the Vietnam War. Her father worked in the justice system there, and when Saigon fell in 1975, like many government employees, he was sent to jail, where he would remain for many years. In 1979, Tu, her sisters, and her mother left Vietnam, hoping to reach America. She shared the story of their voyage with her son, Ethan Russo.  

We know what it means to "like" something. But does that word carry extra meaning in education and learning? What does it mean when students say they "like" a class or fear a teacher doesn't "like" them? In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger explore perceptions and realities of "likes" in education.

Jorge Sanhueza-lyon / KUT

Women's Marches are taking place across the country on the anniversary of Donald Trump's inauguration. Last year, tens of thousands of protesters packed streets in many cities — including in Austin, where an estimated 50,000 people crowded along Congress Avenue and on the Capitol grounds. 

This morning, a much smaller group of protesters gathered at Austin City Hall in preparation for a march to the Texas Capitol. 

KUT Weekend brings you some of our favorite stories from the KUT newsroom. Updated Fridays.

Texas Tribune

A federal judge has ruled Texas will continue to need oversight of how it cares for vulnerable children, even after sweeping legislative changes last year.

In a 116-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Janis Jack ruled on Friday afternoon that Texas leaders will remain under the watchful eye of federal special masters for three years as they implement more policies for how abused and neglected children are protected. She wrote in her ruling that “the system remains broken and DFPS has demonstrated an unwillingness to take tangible steps to fix the broken system.”

Last month on All Things Considered, NPR's Kelly McEvers and Pop Culture Happy Hour's Linda Holmes and Glen Weldon talked about this era of TV and movies, many of which are remakes or reboots catering nostalgic audiences.

Weldon asserted that nostalgia is rooted in things you choose to enjoy.

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