Texas
9:53 pm
Tue July 7, 2015

As Seniors Live and Work Longer, Some See an Opportunity to Change Careers

Attorney Kay Lively, 72, visits elderly clients in their homes for meetings. Lively has made several career changes throughout her life.
Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

Have you ever had to reinvent your career? For some people, later-in-life career reinvention isn't an option — it's an essential survival tool.

More seniors are working now than ever before, and according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the next seven years will only bring those numbers up. By 2022, the Bureau estimates 1 of every 3 Americans between the ages of 65 and 74 will still be employed — but not necessarily in the same line of work they worked in before.

One Austinite who falls within that age range has reinvented her career – four times.

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U.S.
4:36 pm
Tue July 7, 2015

Texas Bikers Arrested After Waco Shootout Say They Are Innocent

Motorcycle gang-related gunfire killed nine people at the Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas, on May 17. More than 170 people were arrested on charges of "engaging in organized criminal activity."
Jerry Larson AP

Originally published on Tue July 7, 2015 9:30 pm

In May, a fight between two rival motorcycle clubs turned into a bloodbath in Waco, Texas. Nine people were shot dead, and at least 20 were injured.

In the end, 177 people were arrested and jailed on charges of engaging in organized crime.

But many of them say they had nothing to do with these "outlaw" motorcycle clubs — and nothing to do with the violence.

Among them are Walt and Ester Weaver. Walt says he's stunned by the way authorities handled the situation.

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Education
4:11 pm
Tue July 7, 2015

Public Speaks Out on Placement of Jefferson Davis Statue at UT Austin

In June, amidst a nationwide conversation about Confederate symbols, a Jefferson Davis statue on the UT Austin campus was graffitied with 'Black Lives Matter.'
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

The future of monuments to Civil War figures on the University of Texas at Austin campus was discussed at a public forum today. The University held the first of two forums to collect community feedback about the placement of a statue of Jefferson Davis on the main mall of campus.

In June, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley declared that the state would remove the Confederate flag from its Capitol building, in the wake of a racially motivated shooting spree in a Charleston church that killed nine. South Carolina's state senators voted officially today to remove the flag, but elsewhere in the U.S., the debate about Confederate symbols, hate and history continues.

Students, staff, professors, alumni and Austinites stood on the auditorium stage of the Student Activity Center this afternoon and voiced their thoughts on the Davis statue — its history, and what it represents and symbolizes to students. 

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Austin
10:36 am
Tue July 7, 2015

Same-Sex Couples Looking to Adopt Could See Changes in Form Language

A sample birth certificate form from the City of Austin offers slots for 'Mother' and 'Father.' The state is reviewing the forms to offer language that accommodates same-sex couples.
Credit City of Austin

Earlier this month, Florida repealed its ban on adoption by same-sex couples. That’s never been illegal in Texas, but whether or not a same-sex couple can adopt a child has always come down to a judge’s opinion. But with the Supreme Court’s decision on same-sex marriage in Obergefell v. Hodges last month, judges in Texas can no longer discriminate based on a couple’s makeup.

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Austin
9:07 am
Tue July 7, 2015

Central Texas Students Fight 'Summer Melt' Between High School and College

amslerpix/flickr

High schools like to brag about how many students they graduate and how many of those students are headed to college in the fall. 

But once those graduating seniors receive their diploma, for many schools, their work is done. The support these students have grown accustomed to throughout high school disappears. 

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Business
7:39 am
Tue July 7, 2015

Enduring Barbecue Line at Franklin Sprouts New Businesses

Desmond Roldan (right) is the 13-year-old behind BBQ Fast Pass, the line-sitting service. He's pictured here with his friend, Jiovani Acosta, on July 3, 2015.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

It doesn't matter if it's 100 degrees out or it's raining – if you want to eat at Austin's Franklin Barbecue you have to wait in a line for an average of about five hours. That's no secret.

But in the last year, a growing number of people, like Desmond Roldan, have started making money off of that line. And for them, the longer the line, the better.

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Austin
7:26 am
Tue July 7, 2015

Google Testing Self-Driving Vehicles in Austin

Google's confirmed that it's testing a self-driving car system in Austin. The project is working independently from the City of Austin and the Texas Department of Transportation, both of whom have expressed support for the project.

From the Texas Tribune:

After years of experimenting with its groundbreaking autonomous vehicle technology almost exclusively in California, Google confirmed Monday that it has begun testing one of its self-driving vehicles in Austin.

A white Lexus RX 450h SUV outfitted with the company’s sensors and software began making trips without the aid of a driver in the city within the past week, said Jennifer Haroon, head of business operations for the Google self-driving car project. Another vehicle will join it in the area for testing this week.

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U.S.
4:29 am
Tue July 7, 2015

In Rio Grande Valley, Some Campaign Workers Are Paid To Harvest Votes

Mary Helen Flores (center) is the founder of Citizens Against Voter Abuse.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Tue July 7, 2015 8:26 am

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up entrenched wrongdoing by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. In the final part of this series, we examine vote-stealing and election fraud.

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Texas Standard
5:16 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Texas Observer Reports Mass Graves Investigation May Have Been Botched

Grave markers next to a Brooks County burial plot marked for exhumation in May 2013 by the Baylor University forensics team.
Texas Observer

From Texas Standard:

John Carlos Frey, a reporter with the Texas Observer, joins the Texas Standard to talk about the wrong-doings he found while looking into an inquiry led by the Texas Rangers.

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U.S.
1:13 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Corruption On The Border: Dismantling Misconduct In The Rio Grande Valley

Jonathan Treviño shows seized contraband. The former police narcotics squad leader is currently serving 17 years in prison for reselling narcotics back to drug dealers.
Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 10:57 am

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up pervasive misconduct by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. But as NPR's John Burnett and Marisa Penaloza report, the problems are entrenched.

The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is a world apart, isolated by empty ranch land to the north, the Gulf to the east, and Mexico to the south. A million-and-a-half people live there amid dazzling wealth and stark poverty.

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Texas
12:59 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

In So-Called 'Mix-Up,' Detained Immigrant Kids Get Adult Dose of Hepatitis A Vaccine

Children detained at immigration centers, like the ones in the towns of Dilley and Karnes (pictured) in Texas, are administered a series of immunizations after they arrive.
Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT News

About 250 children at a South Texas immigrant detention center were administered adult-size doses of a Hepatitis A vaccine, officials say. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is calling the mistake a "mix-up." ICE spokesperson Richard Rocha said this weekend health professionals are monitoring the children who received the wrong dosage of the vaccine.

The kids are detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas, southwest of San Antonio. The facility is an immigrant detention center for mothers and their children, and it's run by a private prison company called Corrections Corporation of America.

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Education
11:25 am
Mon July 6, 2015

ACC Opens Center to Help Reduce 'Summer Melt'

A new center at ACC looks to help students navigate the process of college enrollment.
Austin Community College

Students heading to college have many steps to take before they can enroll. Some of those steps, like navigating the financial aid system, choosing which courses to take and finally scheduling classes, can be daunting for some students. 

Austin Community College is trying to make the process easier for students by establishing a new center to help shepherd struggling students through the process.

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:13 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Why Emotional Pain Feels Different from Physical Pain

With all types of pain, addressing it from both the physiological and affective ends may be the best solution until the actual root of the problem is uncovered.
Credit flickr/creative commons

Pain can range from barely noticeable to excruciating. Yet pain, in all its forms, is important. It is how the body communicates there is a problem.

Physical pain in the ankle may ask us to stop walking so fast or demand a pair of crutches immediately. Likewise, emotional pain may indicate that we need to talk about a problem with our partner or severe the relationship entirely.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, add to the series on pain and the brain, with a discussion on emotional pain and memory.

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Health
7:42 am
Mon July 6, 2015

As More Parents Opt Out of Vaccinations, More Texas Doctors Require Them

Dr. Alison Ziari with the Austin Regional Clinic announces the company's new policy requiring pediatric patients to get immunized on June 30, 2015.
KUT News

Vaccines have been in the news yet again lately. On June 30, 2015, California’s Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill that requires almost all school children to be fully vaccinated in order to go to school, allowing only some medical exemptions.

Meantime, a health care company in Central Texas says it will no longer treat children who don’t get fully immunized. The company cites a measles outbreak that started in Disneyland last year as a chief reason for the policy change. Texas does allow parents to opt out of vaccinations if they use religious or personal beliefs. 

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Get Involved
5:00 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Get Involved Spotlight: Urban Roots

From Urban Roots,  this month’s Get Involved spotlight non-profit:

Urban Roots uses food and farming to transform the lives of young people and inspire, engage, and nourish the community. Originally founded in 2007 as a program of YouthLaunch, in 2011 Urban Roots became its own thriving, independent non-profit agency.

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KUT Weekend
2:34 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

Listen to Our Weekly News Podcast!

KUT Weekend brings you our favorite stories from the KUT newsroom. Updated Fridays!

Texas
1:20 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

Three Tips to Stay Safe In and Around Water

Just like responsible drinkers assign a 'designated driver,' responsible swimmers should also have someone assigned to 'watch duty' on a rotating basis
Joy Diaz/KUT News

Most drownings are among those "preventable" tragedies. And yet, not everyone knows which precautions to take to prevent such accidents. In Texas alone, 73 kids died last year in the water. And adults are just as vulnerable. So, here are 3 tips to make your water gatherings more enjoyable.

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Politics
11:21 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Lawyers Threaten to File Complaint Against Paxton For Same-Sex Marriage Response

Texas attorneys are threatening to file a complaint against state Attorney General Ken Paxton for his statement that county clerks who refuse to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples could get pro bono legal representation.
Laura Buckman/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Roughly 150 Texas attorneys have signed on to a letter threatening to file a complaint with the State Bar of Texas against Attorney General Ken Paxton for his response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage.

"It seems to us that your edict to encourage Texas clerks to violate a direct ruling of the United States Supreme Court violates" the State Bar's rules requiring attorneys to uphold the U.S. Constitution, the letter states. 

Paxton’s office did not immediately respond to requests seeking comment on Friday morning. After the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage nationwide, he issued an opinion telling Texas clerks they did not have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples if it violated their religious beliefs — though he suggested that they could face litigation.

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Energy & Environment
10:23 am
Fri July 3, 2015

U.S. Sees a Net Gain of Oil Rigs for the First Time in 2015

The Baker Hughes oil fields services firm says the U.S. saw a net gain of three rigs last week.
Eddie Seal/Texas Tribune

For the first time this year, the number of oil rigs operating in the U.S. went up, according to oil field services company Baker Hughes. But what does that mean for the largest oil producing state in the country?

For Texas, and the U.S., the increase is more of a bellwether, but after months of declines it could signal a stabilizing of the U.S. oil markets. According to Baker Hughes, there was a net gain of only three rigs – a loss of nine gas rigs was offset by the addition of 12 oil rigs.

Star Spencer is a senior editor for Platts Energy Information Service. She says it looks like the industry is betting that U.S. crude has settled around $60 a barrel.

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Austin
8:15 am
Fri July 3, 2015

How to Enjoy the Fireworks (and Get Home Safely) This 4th of July

The city's fireworks celebration will begin as early as 5 p.m. on Saturday. It's the first time the event's been held at Auditorium Shores in two years.
Mengwen Cao for KUT

It’s nearly time for the Fourth of July celebration in Austin.

There’ll be warm weather and probably plenty of sun, all capped off by fireworks at Auditorium Shores for the first time in years. But there’s also going to be plenty of traffic, road closures and scarce parking. Here's a look at when and where to see the fireworks, closures and alternate ways of getting around. 

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