Courtesy of Jerry Parsons

This week’s Wayback Wednesday examines the state’s beloved bluebonnet, though not the "blue" so much as the other hues that have graced the petals of Texas' state flower.

The wildflower comes in all manner of colors – blue, white, pink, red and even maroon, which Longhorn fans became intimately aware of last year. But the roots of these bluebonnet variants stretch back over 30 years, when a young, if not naïve, Texas A&M vegetable specialist took up the challenge of creating a Texas flag solely comprised of the state flowers.

“Being naïve, I said, ‘We’ve already got a third of it done!’ like an idiot,” says former Texas A&M horticulturist Jerry Parsons. “You know how young people are.”

StuSeeger/Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuseeger/

If you like seeing the wildflowers around Central Texas this spring, get ready for a bigger finish for the season.

At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, they say there’s been a slow start, but could be late peak. Cooler weather has delayed the peak of some blooms and it looks like a good late season for flowers that need less rain.

Callie Hernandez/KUT News

Temperatures in Central Texas approached record levels today. But after a few days of warmer-than-normal weather, many of the area’s plants are at risk of blooming too soon.

When the soil starts to warm, that’s a signal to many trees, shrubs, and flowers that spring is here, said Daphne Richards, a horticulturist with Texas A&M AgriLife.

Lady Bird Wildflower Center

It’s been one hundred years since the birth of the legendary Lady Bird Johnson.

The Texas First Lady's time in the White House was marked by several environmental conservation and beautification efforts – a cause she pursued locally after leaving Washington with the foundation of the National Wildflower Research Center and her work beautifying Town Lake (which was since renamed in her honor).

The Wildflower Center, which bears Lady Bird’s name, remembers Mrs. Johnson this Sunday with a day-long tribute. Admission is free, with doors opening at 9 a.m.

Photo by Callie Hernandez for KUT News

What better way to get one's mind off the recent cold weather than to think of the coming warm spring and the annual colorburst that is wildflower season?

Well...don't get your hopes up too high, according to a senior botanist at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center