Wayback Wednesday

US National Archives and Records Administration

In 1967, famed landscape artist Peter Hurd unveiled a portrait of then-President Lyndon B. Johnson. It was to be Johnson's official portrait and would hang in the White House in perpetuity. There was one problem: LBJ hated it. 

Did Texas Host The First Thanksgiving?

Nov 23, 2016
Courtesy of the University of Texas at El Paso Library, via Jose Cisneros

It's common knowledge that in 1621 the first Thanksgiving was celebrated at Plymouth. 

But some say the “real” first Thanksgiving took place more than 20 years earlier near present-day El Paso, when at least 400 Spaniards, in an exploration led by Juan de Oñate, feasted with the Mansos tribe.

Like any good Thanksgiving discussion, there’s a thread of discord sown through that narrative. While everyone recognizes its importance in the history of North America, some argue that, unlike the feast at Plymouth, it’s not a harvest festival.

Courtesy of Jim Nicar

Bevo, the bovine booster of the University of Texas Longhorns, is a nearly century-old institution.

There have been 14 incarnations of the mascot, with the 15th making its game-day debut this Sunday at the Longhorns’ opener against Notre Dame. But Bevo wasn’t always a beloved fixture on the sidelines.

In fact, people kind of hated him.

Austin American-Statesman

In 1966, Gordon Knight quite literally dodged a bullet.

The longtime Austin American-Statesman newspaper salesman should’ve been walking his usual beat on the west side of UT Austin on August 1, when Charles Whitman opened fire from his perch on the UT Tower. But he wasn’t, and late that morning, a bullet from Whitman’s rifle found another newsboy: 17-year-old Alex Hernandez.

Illustration by Tom Lea

One hundred eight years ago, Harper Baylor Lee’s hobby became something more than that.

The 24-year-old worked for the Central Mexican Railroad in Guadalajara, Mexico, where he’d spent most of his life after a move from El Paso. But on a Tuesday in July, after years as an amateur, he started a career in bullfighting and became the first American-born matador.