water

Plant Industry, CSIRO/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

It’s clean-up time at the home where Ron Gertson is staying. He’s taking refuge at his brother’s house because his house is uninhabitable at the moment. It is full of flood water from Hurricane Harvey.

Flickr/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

In 2016, Texas was one of the fastest growing states in the country, adding almost a half-million people in a year’s time. With growth like that, securing future water supplies will become critical, so Sen. Ted Cruz filed a bill to loosen regulations around importing water from other states. The idea is to make it easier for Texas to buy water from its neighbors. But some worry it could lead to environmental destruction.

Pixabay (CC0)

From Texas Standard:

Officials lifted the three-and-a-half day ban on the use of tap water in Corpus Christi on Sunday. Residents can now use the water for drinking, showering and washing clothes and dishes.

Corpus Christi, Texas, has lifted a water ban for some parts of the city, while continuing to warn residents in the middle of the city not to use their tap water for any reason.

Officials warned residents on Wednesday night of possible contamination by an industrial chemical, and emphasized that boiling or otherwise treating water did not make it safe to use for drinking or washing.

The chemical in question has been identified, Sara Flores of member station KEDT in Corpus Christi reports.

City officials in Corpus Christi, Texas, are warning residents not to use their tap water — at all — after possible contamination by an unknown chemical.

A press release from the city points to "a recent back-flow incident in the industrial district," and instructs residents to use just bottled water all food preparation, drinking, washing and bathing needs until further notice.

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