Two Guys on Your Head

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What is the value of our relationships? As it turns out, the way we answer that question defines the relationship itself.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the various ways we understand the economics of the relationships in our lives, and why the value of community should never be underestimated.

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There's no such thing as a "tell." For example, when people look up, fidget or stutter they might just be nervous, and not exactly lying. However, because we rely on the truth to make our culture go round, it might make our lives easier if we could just spot a liar out of the crowd.

As it turns out you can tell if people are telling the truth or not, but it takes some skill, time and knowledge.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about lying, and a new study that reveals a more accurate way to catch someone in a lie.

If you're interested in the health of your brain, it's likely that you've read a study or two about the cognitive benefits of sleep.

Yet a new study published in Perspectives on Psychological Science suggests that we may not reap the wonderfully cleansing and rejuvenating rewards of sleep in old age.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why needing a lot of sleep in old age might not be such a good sign.

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There are a lot of factors that help to regulate our overall heath and wellness. If we are content in our life and relationships, we are more likely to be healthy.

If we exercise and eat well, we reap the benefits in our mind and body. And, as recent studies by Ted Kaptchuck and others show, if we take medications or supplements, even if they're nothing but rice powder and sugar, we can feel better.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why taking placebos somehow makes us feel healthier.

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"She hit me first!” “He never said he was sorry!” "She doesn’t care if I forgive her, so why should I?”

From the time we are very small, our interpersonal relationships are based on conflict. But in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychological purpose of forgiveness.

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Did you ever have a relationship that makes you cringe thinking back on it? What did I ever even see in that person? you ask yourself. Good news though: You don't have to wallow in self-pity for long, because it turns out that we can overlook almost anything if we want to.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why we wear "rose colored glasses," or are sometimes repulsed by certain people seemingly without reason.

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Have you ever thought of a friend you haven't seen in a long time only to run into them the same day? Have you ever thought of a historical figure and had that same person be a clue in the New York Times crossword puzzle?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke explain the psychology behind coincidence and why looking at the world through a more mathematical lens might help people see things differently.

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Paranoia is an interesting feeling. People can, and often do, spin stories about almost anything. But most of the time, in functioning brains, people can check their stories with others to "collaborate" with reality, making them less likely to spiral downward into a paranoid state.

However, if cognitive functioning is impaired (from not getting enough sleep, drinking or drugs, or mental illness) it's more difficult to check in, and paranoid thoughts can run wild.

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There's a time during childhood when something as innocuous as an impending bedtime can cause uncontrollable tears, screaming and thrashing. The question for parents and caregivers is: What's the best way to deal with a tantrum?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why people throw temper tantrums and how to deal with them in the future.

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If you love soap operas, you are well aware that 1 in 10 people are likely to suffer head trauma and completely forget whether they are supposed to marry Brad, Bo, or Branna. But in real life that type of retrograde amnesia is not that common at all.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the different types of amnesia and how we know what we do about memory loss.

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"He slit a sheet, a sheet he slit, upon a slitted sheet he sits." Okay now, five times fast.

Tongue twisters and rhymes are a great way to entertain yourself and your friends at parties and on long road trips, but what makes for a good tongue twister and how do they work in the brain?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, talk about why tongue twisters are so effective, and why rhymes are so attractive.

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As a gift to our listeners, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke bring you a special holiday edition of Two Guys On Your Head. We'll explore questions about the link between freewill and gratitude, why we feel so compelled to recreate traditions exactly as we remember them, and why yawning is contagious. Plus, we'll take a trip to The Thinkery with Dr. Cristine Legare.

It's the holidays so let's celebrate with Two Guys on Your Head!

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A lot of times we may think our memories are accurate. We might rely on eye witness testimony to tell us the “truth” about what happened at a crime scene.

Yet, as Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke point out in this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, our memories of certain events depend more on our interpretation of them, rather then how the events may have played out at the time.

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Merriam-Webster defines delusion as “a belief that is not true; a false idea.”

Being tagged as delusional can carry a negative connotation, but delusions can also breed positive outcomes, allowing a person to self-define in a way that could allow them to step out of their behavioral wheelhouse and reinvent themselves.

On this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Bob Duke and Dr. Art Markman sit down with KUT’s Rebecca McInroy to explore human perception, how we objectively measure reality and how perception can sometimes lead to delusion.

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For many of us, Thanksgiving means spending time with our families, carrying out traditions that we’ve practiced for years.

While it can be very stressful, messy, and challenging to spend time with family members you don’t see very often, it can also be a beautiful time of re-centering. 

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Why are extreme sports, like cross fit, rock climbing, snowboarding, mountaineering, rafting, cave diving, wakeboarding and even surfing so popular?  Well, it’s not just that they’re cool.

Activities that we can include in the category of extreme sports are all very physically challenging and involve some element of risk. But how could anyone's idea of thrill-seeking also be potentially life-threatening?

This week, the Two Guys, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, discuss the appeal of extreme sports. 

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Time marches on and, whether we like it or not, we age.
With age comes a decline in both physical abilities and mental acuity. Memory and cognition peak in our early twenties, then we begin a slow, steady decline of those functions as we approach our senior years. 

This week on "Two Guys on Your Head," Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke join host Rebecca McInroy to discuss how physical and mental stimuli can help combat the signs and symptoms of old age, stave off memory loss and help you be at your best well into your golden years.

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The human brain is perhaps the most complicated machine in the known universe, and the way we sometimes try to understand it’s capacity is to liken it to the most sophisticated artifacts we’ve created. The brain is hence “like a computer” and no longer like the “steam engine” it was compared to in the late 19th century.

The circuitry in the brain is made up of pretty basic materials, so it’s understandable that we would try to replicate it.  Yet it seems the more we learn about the brain, the more complex it becomes.The development of A.I., while it brings about a better understanding of how our brains work, it also generates more questions about what it means to be human.

What counts as “human”? Why is intelligence the marker of humanity? And what types of questions are currently vexing computer scientists, psychologists, and philosophers about A.I.?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke take us through a brief history of the development of artificial intelligence, and pose some interesting questions about where we might be headed.

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We value brains. We hold test scores in high esteem. We spend money and hours on brain training games and ginseng. But what does intelligence really mean? How do we define and gauge actual smarts? Does a high IQ predict success?

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the history and development of intelligence tests; as well as what these tests can actually tell us about one's ability to achieve.

www.inquisitr.com

Halloween will soon be upon us, and among the ghouls and goblins walking the streets, you might see someone dressed up an Ebola patient out asking for candy. How will you respond?

Would you buckle over in laughter, or would you be totally offended by this irreverent ode to this devastating threat?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss why we respond to fear and other uncomfortable and threatening situations with humor.

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