Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

When it comes to the electoral college, Texas is like most states: winner-take-all (only two states, Nebraska and Maine, aren't). So we're red and, if Democrats' dreams came true, we'd someday be blue.

Wendy Davis, a former gubernatorial candidate and former state senator from Dallas-Fort Worth, says she sees a possibility of a change in hue.

 


Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

If Democrats hope to block the Republican agenda in the executive and legislative branches, they may need an old tool of the Senate – the filibuster. It allows dissenting senators to block bills and nominees backed by the majority. Or, as Republican Rep. Bill Flores of Texas explained on the Standard yesterday:

"It prevents the Senate from ... its Constitutional responsibilities. And so what I say is, majority leader Mitch McConnell, if he's the majority leader, needs to get rid of the filibuster. We're going to need to get rid of it in order to get the Supreme Court appointees. We're going to need it to pass the appropriations bills we want.”

 


Gabriel Cristóver Pérez for The Texas Tribune

Of all the people worried about a Donald Trump presidency, few are freaking out more than the young undocumented immigrants who were granted relief from deportation under President Barack Obama's 2012 executive order.

European Commission DG ECHO/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

If you're a news junkie, it might seem like the presidential election was the only thing worth covering for the past 18 months. But plenty of stories went under- or unreported. What stories have flown under the radar while the nation recoiled at this year's campaign outrages and sat riveted to the horse race?

David Uberti, staff writer at the Columbia Journalism Review, says the way news is distributed puts much of the coverage power in the hands of the news consumer.


Screenshot via fivethirtyeight.com

From Texas Standard:

One fateful night in 2000 left the nation without a president-elect for over a month: the election between Democrat Al Gore and Republican George W. Bush was too close to call.

But that didn't stop network news from calling the race wrong – twice. First, many reported that Gore won Florida, then media sites called the electoral college for Bush, as the official campaign results played out in the courtroom.
 


Bob Daemmrich, Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:

A Texas legislative panel is recommending $75.3 million in emergency funding for the Department of Family and Protective Services to start fixing the state's dysfunctional foster care system, but agency Commissioner Hank Whitman won't get everything he requested.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard:

It’s the final full day of the 2016 presidential campaign, but in Tyler, Texas, it's not politics on the minds of most folks today. It is, rather, the story of ten-year-old Kayla Gomez-Orozco, the subject of a statewide Amber Alert since she went missing after a church service last Tuesday night.

Her body was found Sunday morning behind a home in Bullard, Texas. About 300 people turned out last night at Kayla's elementary school for a vigil. A family member has been arrested and is being held in the Smith County Jail on a federal Immigration Customs detainer. The suspect had been deported in 2014 but returned to Texas a short time later.

The daily newspaper there devotes its entire front page to Kayla's story and how parents are struggling to talk with their own kids about the incident. This is happening at a time when Tyler and the rest of the nation are settling in for an historic election.

Here's our last statewide editors' roundtable before the 2016 election, with editors from Tyler, El Paso and Odessa.


Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

We're just one day away from putting the 2016 election in the record books – so we thought we'd take a few minutes to highlight the top five Texas moments that shaped the election.

Kevin Diaz, Washington correspondent for the Houston Chronicle, says many of these top five Texas-related moments involve the state's junior senator and one-time presidential candidate, Ted Cruz.

 


PollyDot/Pixabay (CC0)

From Texas Standard:

As Texas slowly cools down for the winter, mosquitoes should start dying off. But the risk of the spread of  mosquito-borne diseases remains even when temperatures hover as low as 50 degrees.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A week before the United Kingdom voted whether or not to leave the European Union, it looked like those in the "Remain" camp could relax – the pundits, the press, even the betting markets were sanguine about the status quo. The polls confirmed their confidence.

But upon closer examination, in the harsh light of retrospect, the polls didn't tell the whole story. Those pointing to a Brexit win were the oddball outliers – until they proved to be correct.


Screenshot via Die Zeit

From Texas Standard:

If the world could decide the next U.S. president, who would they pick?

A German newspaper Die Zeit asked its readers that very question. Other foreign newspapers sent their correspondents to the States – to Texas, in particular – to cover the U.S. election.

Johannes Kuhn, a reporter from the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, says he's been covering the election in and around the Lone Star state. He says the biggest surprise is the way it's been both "entertaining and very over-the-top."


sarowen/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Outside the Memorial Student Center at Texas A&M University a group called “Texas A&M Anti-Racism” practiced protest chants.

Their October 6 “No More Emails March” was one of several demonstrations this semester. This one was in response to multiple mass emails from university President Michael K. Young addressing on-campus racism – action protesters such as Emilio Bernal say doesn’t go far enough.

 


Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller called Hillary Clinton a sexually explicit and obscene epithet – publicly, on Twitter.

He says a staffer posted it, but does that mean he shouldn’t be held responsible?

 


Scurzuzu/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas leads the nation in payday lending and car title loan businesses with more than 3,000 storefronts across the state. Payday lenders are both a blessing and a curse: on one hand, they meet a need; on the other, they do so through sky-high interest rates.

That's why communities of faith are getting involved in the effort to better regulate them. But should faith leaders get involved in money matters?

 


Beth Cortez-Neavel/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

With one week until Election Day, one of the country's most well-known Texans has a suggestion for the rest of the country: start thinking about the day after.

Veteran broadcast journalist Dan Rather, whose documentary debuts tonight on Mark Cuban's AXS network, poses a quandary: even assuming a Clinton victory, why should Americans of all stripes continue to care about the Trump phenomenon?

 


Robert Couse-Baker/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

On June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled bans on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. But as much of a landmark case as that was, some say it left an open interpretation of that right and its associated rights.

Top Texas officials filed an amicus brief last Thursday with the Texas Supreme Court, asking judges to reconsider a Houston lawsuit from early September. At the heart of the case is whether the affirmation of same-sex marriage across the country also compels public employers to extend benefits to married same-sex couples.

 


Richard January/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas is number one in a great many things: oil, ranching, rodeo, cotton. But you may be surprised to know that we are also number one in horror. That's right, our very own charming little low-budget film, "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre," is considered by many critics to be the best (and most horrifying) horror movie ever made.


BootBearWDC/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
Leah Scarpelli/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Growing up in San Antonio, Nina Diaz was one of those kids who spent a lot of time in her bedroom, singing along to the Smiths and imagining the world beyond. Then she got swept up into the music when her sister and a long-time friend asked her to form a rock band, Girl in a Coma.

Pages