texas history

Diann Bayes/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

A gas explosion in Dallas last month killed a 12-year old girl and brought new attention to an aging infrastructure. The natural gas supplier, Atmos Energy, says it’s upgrading old steel pipes in the area, but many wonder why it took a deadly explosion to draw attention to the issue in the first place.

Misty Hurley

From Texas Standard.

The other day, scrolling through Twitter, we came across a picture of two cannons from the Alamo laid out in the bed of a pickup truck, parked outside of a Buc-ee’s. We wondered why these cannons were on a road trip. Turns out it’s part of a restoration project being conducted by the Alamo and Texas A&M University’s Conservation Laboratory.

983/112 R-447-1, Texas Department of Public Safety photographs. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

From Texas Standard.

One hundred years ago Sunday, a posse made up of Texas Rangers and the U.S. military raided the border village of Porvenir in the middle of the night. The lawmen took 15 boys and men of Mexican descent to a bluff and shot them. The Porvenir Massacre is a little-known dark stain on Texas’ history.

Historian Glenn Justice says the massacre happened during a chaotic time.

From Texas Standard:

In the early 1950s, the threat of nuclear war and Communism cast shadows over much of the western hemisphere. And for a brief time, they darkened the pastures and hills of Central Texas more than anywhere else.

U.S. Library of Congress (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

The document that sealed Texas' entry into the United States is the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Mexican officials were forced to sign it in 1848, at the close of the bloody Mexican-American War. The treaty let the United States annex most of Mexico's historic territory and pay $15 million for the land in installments. At least half of Mexico’s regional territory went to the U.S. – what now is Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and California. Both countries would look much different if it were never signed, or if it were to be nullified.