Texas Economy

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Donald Trump said at the kickoff of his presidential campaign in 2015. "They're bringing drugs," he said. "They're bringing crime. They're rapists," allowing that "some, I assume, are good people."

Image via Flickr/Texas Comptroller (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Even though the Texas Legislature failed to pass measures to reform property taxes or the school finance system during the regular and special sessions, the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas says the Texas economy continues to grow at a solid pace.

Comptroller Glenn Hegar is the chief tax collector, accountant and revenue estimator for the state government. Among his responsibilities is providing the legislature with an estimate of state revenue before each regular legislative session.

 

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A week before the United Kingdom voted whether or not to leave the European Union, it looked like those in the "Remain" camp could relax – the pundits, the press, even the betting markets were sanguine about the status quo. The polls confirmed their confidence.

But upon closer examination, in the harsh light of retrospect, the polls didn't tell the whole story. Those pointing to a Brexit win were the oddball outliers – until they proved to be correct.


Image via Flickr/Nan Palmero (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

According to Forbes, Texas has four of America's next boom towns: Austin, San Antonio, Houston and Dallas. Thanks to technology hubs like Austin and "opportunity cities" like San Antonio, Texas is pretty much the blueprint for America's cities of the future.

Flickr/cleopold73 (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Just in time for the start of school, The New York Times reports that there’s a shortage of teachers. Across the country, school districts have gone from refusing to renew contracts to scrambling to hire teachers. This shortage is seen particularly in math, science and special education, and it's a result of the layoffs from the recession years, as well as an improving economy in which fewer people are training to be teachers.

The issue is so critical that some systems are allowing new hires to train on the job and bringing in people who are still finishing their teaching credentials. According to the Times, the situation is most critical in Louisville, Nashville, Oklahoma City and Providence. However, Texas also fares low.

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