SXSW 2015

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

The results of Austin’s annual SXSW economic impact study are in, and according to the findings, the festival once again served as an economic boon to the city.

Courtesy of the film

Festival-only radio show The Daily Buzz brings you its 2015 SXSW Film roundup, its Best of Fest episode. The co-hosts speak with filmmakers from documentary feature, narrative feature and audience award-winning films. 

The episode features interviews with the minds behind: Landfill Harmonic, A Brave Heart: The Lizzie Valesquez Story, Twinsters, A Woman Like Me, Creative Control, and Frame by Frame. Hosts also speak with Janet Pierson, head of SXSW Film, and Hugh Forrest, head of SXSW Interactive.

SXSW: Episode Seven from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

During the KPop meetup at Blackheart, The Daily Buzz spent some time with Korean indie rock band Eastern Sidekick. The band consists of main songwriter and lead guitarist Ko Hangyul, Bae Sanghwan on bass guitar, Ryu Inhyuk on guitars and Ko Myungchul on drums.

Matt Largey/KUT News

You might have seen it on Buzzfeed.

An article called “Here’s what Austinites really think about South by Southwest.”

"Utter madness," they called it. "Crazy." "Thrilling."

I was suspicious.

The people all looked like they were fresh out of college. Did they even live here? Real Austinites, you know, who've been here a few years, like to grumble about South by Southwest.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

You might be surprised to hear that Sweden is the world’s third biggest exporter of music. ABBA, Ace of Base, and the guy who invented Spotify are all Swedes.

And when Swedish musicians travel outside their country, one of their first stops is South by Southwest.

But what makes Swedish music so popular?

Bernardo Ruiz

This story comes from Texas Standard.

A documentary at SXSW – “Kingdom of Shadows” – forces us to look at the ongoing violence south of the Texas-Mexico border.

The film is told through three people – a Mexican nun working to find answers about tens of thousands of disappearances, a U.S. drug enforcement agent and a former Texas drug smuggler. Bernardo Ruiz directed the film.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

At South by Southwest Music you can hear everything from metal and rock to hip hop and electronic music.

Dozens of genres – but for the most part, they all have one very basic thing in common.

If you’re a musician, it might sound familiar to you:
The musical note A, above middle C, equals 440 hertz.

It’s the basis of virtually every piece of music you’ll hear today. And probably every piece of music you have ever heard, with a few exceptions.

It’s called reference pitch or concert pitch. It’s the note that every other note is based on.

Take a listen:

Every instrument in Western music – more or less – is tuned to this standard.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

This year's South by Southwest Music festival features more than 900 bands – not counting those who play impromptu shows in clubs and houses and on the streets – and as usual, it's drawn swarms of visitors to Austin. KUT/KUTX photographers and multimedia producers are out in the field, capturing images of musicians, crowds and workers.

Click through the photos above for a slideshow.

KUT News

Mary Lou Brown has felt so lonely living in Austin. Since her diagnosis with lupus in 2003, she hasn’t found any support groups for people with the disease. She gets a lot of help from her husband and son, but she says no one gets what it’s like to be in pain all day long.

"[The pain] goes from your heel all the way to the scalp, where no one can touch you," Brown says.

Most of us have an immune system that protects us from germs. But if you have lupus, your immune system can’t tell the difference between the bad guys and healthy tissue, so it attacks the healthy tissue, causing inflammation and pain.

Terrence Henry/KUT News

SXSW Interactive has come to a close, and one big trend this year was connected car technology — that could be anything from your car knowing a light's about to turn red to a vehicle completely driving itself. 

Next week, a car will hit the road on a cross-country drive from San Francisco to New York. Except this car won’t have a driver. Let's take a look at where self-driving car technology is today, and the possible places it could take us. Listen to the story: 

Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

During the South by Southwest Interactive conference last year, only a handful of panels were on Latinos in tech, and those panels were held at an isolated Holiday Inn, nowhere near the convention center downtown.

This year, the panels on Latinos have stretched across a number of days, and all of them have been inside the bustling convention center. We spent some time with people at South by Southwest who identify as Latino to hear about their experience at the conference this year.  Listen to their voices below. 

Nathan Bernier, KUT News

Maybe you didn't RSVP to the events, or maybe you didn't buy an $895 music badge or a $189 wristband, or maybe you hate lines, but you still want a taste of Austin's largest annual assembly of live music? There are options.

Fader Fort is livestreaming four days of live music performances in ultrahigh definition. Dell is organizing the technology and says it's the first time a concert has been livestreamed online in 4K.

"You're going from HD to basically four HD-sized screens, so you're quadrupling the detail," Dell's Scott Hamilton says of 4K technology. "This just takes it to the next level."

Austin History Center

Today marks the beginning of SXSW Music — the final stretch of the three-headed chimera of a festival that draws in droves of music-loving revelers and fills the streets of downtown Austin with both music and traffic.

facebook.com/thejonesfamilysingers

The Jones Family Singers is made up in part of five sisters, two brothers and their father. The gospel music band is based in Bay City, Texas – outside of Houston.

For the last several decades, the Jones Family Singers have been touring churches and winning singing competitions. But it wasn’t until recently that the group started getting some real attention.

That’s thanks in major part to music critic Michael Corcoran. Austin-based Arts and Labor produced an album last year. And now, their story is being told in a film getting its world premiere at South by Southwest: The Jones Family Will Make a Way.

KUT News

Earlier this year, a sometimes-fierce debate broke out between students at Austin High School and the head of an Austin company called #BeSomebody. The company makes money by encouraging people to follow their passions. But when the company’s founder came to speak at the school, the students criticized his message as privileged and disconnected from reality.

Controversy aside, it got us thinking about these lifestyle tech startups — ones based on ideas or messages rather than products and services.

Can they survive? 

Jon Shapley/KUT News

Mason Endres still needs a knee brace to walk. She's one of the 23 survivors of the car crash that killed four people at South by Southwest last year. Endres set aside this morning to visit St. David's Hospital and thank the staff for her recovery.

May Endres, Mason's mom, corralled a big group of doctors and nurses for a photo. 

SXSW Film: Day Five from The Daily Buzz

Mar 17, 2015
Courtesy of the film

It was drizzling this morning in Texas on Day Five of The Daily Buzz at SXSW Film. If you were walking by our broadcasting studio on N. Congress Ave. earlier today, you may have heard violin and cello strings being tuned as we talked with Christine Vachon from Killer Films, award-winning producer of Boys Don't Cry, Far From Heaven and, most recently, Still Alice.

Cody Rea for Texas Standard.

From Texas Standard:

The SXSW Film Conference marks a sort of homecoming for MacArthur genius and Oscar-nominated filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer.

Oppenheimer’s 2012 film, The Act of Killing, looks at how the perpetrators of Indonesia’s military coup cope with their past. His new documentary, The Look of Silence, follows victims of the coup and how they continue to live alongside the people who killed their family members.

Cody Rea for Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Robert Rodriguez is one of Texas’ most high-profile contemporary filmmakers — best known for Sin City, Spy Kids and From Dusk Till Dawn among other films. So, why has he set up a temporary art museum in Austin?

Rodriguez has taken over a space near the Capitol and has lined the exposed brick walls with framed work by fantasy artist Frank Frazetta.

Rodriguez says when he was a kid growing up in San Antonio, he devoured Frazetta’s work – which showed up on the covers of comic books and paperbacks including "Conan the Barbarian," "Tarzan" and "The Death Dealer." Some of the art in the downtown space once even hung on his bedroom wall.

SXSW Film: Day Four from The Daily Buzz

Mar 16, 2015
Courtesy of the film

It’s Day Four of The Daily Buzz at the Historic Stateside Theatre, and there's excitement brewing at the Paramount in anticipation of the 30th anniversary screening of John Hughes’ The Breakfast Club.

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