Political news

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine is Hillary Clinton's choice for her vice president, giving her a running mate with experience at all levels of government to round out the Democratic ticket.

Clinton told supporters the news in a text message and a tweet on Friday evening just after 8 p.m. ET. According to a Clinton campaign official, the former secretary of state called Kaine this evening to make the formal offer.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

There was a little-noticed lawsuit filed in federal court this week.

Lawyers representing six Latino voters in Texas argue the way we elect judges for the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals and the Texas Supreme Court violates the Voting Rights Act because it denies Latino voters an equal opportunity to elect judges of their choice.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Austin is facing legal action over its rules governing short-term rentals, like those you’d find on sites like Airbnb and Homeaway. But some in the hospitality industry say those rentals should have to follow the same rules. The two sides sparred over the issue in a debate Thursday.

Painting a grim picture of America, Donald Trump promised to protect the country and restore "law and order" by putting "America First" in his address Thursday evening formally accepting the GOP nomination for president.

abby livingston / Texas Tribune

CLEVELAND — U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz faced a livid — and yet admiring — Texas delegation on the final day of the Republican National Convention, only 12 hours after Donald Trump loyalists in the convention booed the junior senator off the stage. 

In a standing room-only Texas GOP delegation breakfast Thursday morning, Cruz defended his refusal to endorse the GOP nominee Wednesday evening.

For all those who view the nominating conventions of the major parties as overly scripted, predictable and boring, Wednesday night's session of the Republican National Convention came as a jolt.

The third night of this extravaganza had all the usual hoopla — plus a blackout on the jumbo screens, delegates screaming at each other, and a major presidential candidate getting booed off the stage.

It was supposed to be Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's political coming-out party, but drama with Ted Cruz largely overshadowed his moment at the Republican National Convention.

The crowd quickly turned on Cruz on Wednesday night after he refused to endorse GOP nominee Donald Trump.

The Texas senator and Republican primary runner-up was initially met with a warm reception, holding the crowd in the palm of his hand as he told emotional stories about the recent police shootings in Dallas and how America had to defend the Constitution and the freedoms of speech and religion.

Justin Dehn / Texas Tribune

This week on The Ticket 2016, KUT's Ben Philpott talks with Google Data Editor Simon Rogers about some of the real-time reactions to the speakers at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. (Spoiler – searches for "Chachi Loves Trump" spiked Monday night.)

Cheryl Gerber and Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Texas’ voter identification law violates the U.S. law prohibiting racial discrimination in elections, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. 

Abby Livingston / Texas Tribune

From the Texas TribuneCLEVELAND — U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan surprisingly drew some boos Tuesday morning during remarks to Texas Republicans —  but it was all in good fun. 

Ryan, the headline speaker at Tuesday's Texas delegation breakfast at the Republican National Convention, began with a mischievous bent. As he sought to discuss GOP unity, he enlisted a comparison with college football rivalries.

Justin Dehn / Texas Tribune

The opening night of the Republican National Convention focused on the theme "Make America Safe Again." With speakers focusing on how, as Republicans say, President Obama and Hillary Clinton have made U.S. citizens, its border and military less safe. It was a message that was delivered, in part, with a twang by members of the Texas delegation.

Shelby Tauber/Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Republicans from across the country have made their way to the national convention in Cleveland. And even though their home state candidate isn’t the nominee, Texans are still set to leave their mark on the festivities. That includes Sen. Ted Cruz, who's snagged a coveted prime-time speaking slot.


Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From the Texas TribuneLt. Gov. Dan Patrick is heading to the White House to participate in a town hall discussion on race relations with President Barack Obama.

The event comes in the aftermath of the shooting at a protest in Dallas that left five police officers dead and seven wounded. Patrick spokesman Keith Elkins said the lieutenant governor will be among those interacting with the president at the town hall, which will be broadcast Thursday evening on channels including ABC and ESPN. 

mirsasha via flickr

For more than a century, the Austin State Hospital has been a fixture in Hyde Park. While the facility near Guadalupe and 41st Streets is primarily a psychiatric hospital, its winding trails and tree-lined campus are a popular recreational space for neighbors. Now, state leaders are considering selling the property and relocating the hospital – a move that has some residents concerned. 

Jenna VonHofe for KUT

Natalie Gauldin’s backyard plays by its own rules. The grass tickles our calves and her almost 3-year-old daughter has left some toys scattered around. Dogs bark at us from inside her house in Austin’s District 7. But all these distractions, we tune out. We’re here to talk about one sentence on her campaign website.

Robert Hart / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Gov. Greg Abbott may not attend the Republican National Convention after suffering severe burns during a family vacation in Wyoming.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

The deadline for a federal appeals court to rule on the state’s controversial voter ID law is fast approaching. The U.S. Supreme Court gave the court until July 20 to make a decision about whether the law violates federal civil rights law. But, no matter what happens, this likely isn’t the end of this legal battle.

First of all, the fact that the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals even has a deadline on this is the first indicator that this case is pretty unique.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

In a new effort to regulate abortion providers, Texas health officials are proposing rules that would require abortion providers to cremate or bury fetal remains.

The new rules, proposed by the Health and Human Services Commission, would no longer allow abortion providers to dispose of fetal remains in sanitary landfills, instead allowing only cremation or interment of all remains — regardless of the period of gestation. Abortion providers currently use third-party special waste disposal services.

Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

After years of Texas trying to lure businesses away from other states, New York has struck back — with an ad that paints the Lone Star State as unwelcoming and discriminatory to the LGBT community.

The two-minute ad released by New York’s chief economic development agency highlights the Empire State’s principles of inclusion and equality, claiming these characteristics make it welcoming for all businesses.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, facing federal and state securities fraud charges, is getting more than a little help from his friends to foot his growing legal bill.

The Republican accepted more than $329,000 earmarked for his legal defense from donors and “family friends,” according to a newly released financial disclosure statement.