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Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

This week on the show: Republican Nominee Donald Trump was in Austin to raise money, tape a show with FOX News host Sean Hannity, and hold a rally before thousands of supporters. KUT's Ben Philpott will guide you through the day with stories and interview from the supporters and protestors following The Donald.

Miguel Gutierrez, Jr/KUT

UPDATE: A spokesman for the Republican Party of Texas says the party considers Morrow's filing of paperwork for his write-in presidential run to be in violation of state law, and thus triggered his resignation.

Scott Ball, via Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump says he is open to a "softening" in laws dealing with people who are in the country illegally, offering a pivot away from the hardline immigration views he espoused throughout the primaries. 

Trump made the remarks during a taping Tuesday afternoon of a town hall in Austin with Fox News host Sean Hannity. 

Miguel Gutierrez, Jr/KUT

Donald Trump has arrived in Austin. He's taping a town hall event at ACL Live at the Moody Theater from 4 to 6 p.m. He'll head to a fundraiser at 6:30 p.m. at the Headliners Club, then on to a rally at the Travis County Expo Center at 7:30 p.m.

Gage Skidmore via flickr

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is scheduled to appear at a rally in Austin tonight.

That’s right. A Republican running for national office is holding a rally in the most liberal city in the state and it’s just 76 days until Election Day.

Jorge Sanhueza Lyon / KUT

Texas elections officials have a big task ahead of them. After a federal court ruled the state’s voter ID law was discriminatory, Texas now has to explain its tweaks to the law ahead of Election Day in November.


Gage Skidmore via flickr

Donald Trump is holding a rally Tuesday in Austin, his first public event in Texas as the Republican presidential nominee.

Trump was already scheduled to visit Texas on Tuesday for private fundraisers in Fort Worth and Austin. His campaign announced Friday he will also attend the rally, which is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. at Luedecke Arena.

Just months after Paul Manafort was promoted to bring some structure to and scale up Donald Trump's presidential bid, the Washington insider has resigned from the campaign.

In a statement Friday morning, Trump said that Manafort offered his resignation. The candidate said he is "very appreciative for his great work in helping to get us where we are today, and in particular his work guiding us through the delegate and convention process."

"Paul is a true professional and I wish him the greatest success," Trump continued.

Gage Skidmore via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

In 2012, Greg Abbott caused a stir when he issued this warning to international election observers: Don’t set foot inside Texas polling places.

Cooper Neill

A new poll suggests there is at least one fellow Republican who could unseat U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz in 2018: Rick Perry.

The former Texas governor would beat Cruz by 9 percentage points, according to the forthcoming survey from the Democratic-leaning firm Public Policy Polling. Set to be released later today, the poll found Perry would get 46 percent of the vote and Cruz 37 percent, with 18 percent saying they are not sure whom they would support.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Former Gov. Rick Perry is defending Donald Trump's war of words with the family of a fallen Muslim soldier, saying the father "struck the first blow" against the Republican presidential nominee and is not above criticism in return. 

"In a campaign, if you’re going to go out and think that you can take a shot at somebody and not have incoming coming back at you, shame on you," Perry said in an interview Tuesday on CNN. 

Michael Stravato / Shelby Tauber via Texas Tribune

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is leading Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by just 6 percentage points in deep-red Texas, according to a new poll. 

Trump gets 44 percent support to Clinton's 38 percent in the survey, which was done by Democratic-leaning firm Public Policy Polling. Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson received 6 percent, while Green Party nominee Jill Stein got 2 percent.

Illustration by Todd Wiseman

FORT WORTH — Despite the state's request for an expedited ruling, a federal judge took no action Friday on a request to block the Obama administration's guidelines to accommodate transgender students.

U.S. District Court Judge Reed O'Connor did not issue a ruling from the bench after an almost two-hour long hearing during which state attorneys — as part of a Texas-led, 13-state effort to block the guidelines — argued they unconstitutionally “hold a gun to the head” of states and school districts.

State Rep. Dawnna Dukes (D-Austin) missed 44 of 50 legislative committee meetings last year and skipped 84 percent of House votes, according to reporting by the Austin American-Statesman. Dukes says she was recovering car accident injuries, but a review of her social media accounts shows in the same time period, she went to a Stevie Wonder concert, traveled to East Texas and attended a community festival.

Andrew Harnik/AP

This week on the show: KUT's Ben Philpott and the Texas Tribune's Jay Root spent last week going over a few examples of Donald Trump's rocky road transitioning from GOP Primary Candidate to Republican Nominee.

But Hillary Clinton has had her own stumbles. So this week they'll review how she's doing as she tries to reach out to more than just the Democratic base.

And to help talk about how Republicans could take advantage of those slips, GOP consultant Matt Mackowiak joins the conversation.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Democratic Vice Presidential nominee Tim Kaine stopped in Austin yesterday and met with local volunteers and supporters to thank them for their work.

While the focus of his visit was mostly to let Texas Democrats know they are important to the national party, Kaine also had to address – and strongly denounce – Donald Trump’s latest comments aimed at Hillary Clinton.


Cheryl Gerber / Texas Tribune

A federal judge is hearing possible fixes to the state’s voter ID law today.

The state was forced to make some changes because the law was ruled discriminatory. While some proposed changes have been agreed upon by both sides, the judge will still have to settle some disputes about just what voters will have to do to cast a ballot in November. Both sides have proposed expanding the list of IDs voters can use at the polls.


Editor's note: NPR will also be fact-checking Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's planned economic speech this Thursday.

Donald Trump is coming off a week of disastrous headlines and cratering poll numbers. His major economic speech on Monday at the Detroit Economic Club, a vision described by his campaign as "Winning the Global Competition," was a chance to turn the page.

This week on the show: With the party conventions finally over, the Texas Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott will dive into what the race looks likes as the campaigns really kick off. And what Donald Trump's very, very, VERY bad week could mean moving forward.

And as you've probably already seen, one of the biggest stories this week is the post-convention polls! We'll have UT Austin pollster Jim Henson guide us through all the big bounces in the last month.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Texas struck a deal Wednesday that will soften its voter ID law for the November general election — a development that lawyers suing the state say will make it easier for minorities to cast their ballots. 

The state reached the agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice and minority rights groups just a few weeks after a federal appeals court ruled that Texas’ 2011 voter identification law was discriminatory.


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