Politics

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Brett Buchanan/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:There's the Austin ophthalmologist responsible for his trademark glasses. The former Texas Tech official who wants to represent his parents in Congress. The former police chief of Dalworthington Gardens.

Meet Rick Perry's class of 2016.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Coming together, at least for now, is not easy.

That was on full display over the past three days here at the Texas GOP convention, where a party once solidly behind favorite son Ted Cruz in the presidential race grappled with uniting behind his fiercest rival and now the presumptive nominee, Donald Trump. There was little visible resistance to Trump, but the ambivalence loomed large over the Kay Bailey Hutchison Center less than two weeks after Cruz bowed out of the race. 

Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

Republican Party leaders and activists are meeting in Dallas this week for their bi-annual convention. Aside from discussing party platforms and future legislative priorities, leaders are trying to gin up excitement ahead of this year’s presidential election. However, that’s proving to be tougher than usual in a state that overwhelmingly supported Sen. Ted Cruz in the Republican presidential primary.


Screen shot courtesy of CNN

This week on The Ticket 2016: It's been just over a week since Ted Cruz dropped out of the Republican Presidential nomination race. He popped up over the weekend at the Kentucky Derby and headed back to work in the U.S. Senate. But what about his campaign staff? What's next for them? Ben Philpott talks with Republican consultant Deirdre Delisi about life after the party ends.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Within hours of Austinites voting to keep current ride-hailing company regulations, including fingerprint-based background checks, state lawmakers began to debate whether those regulations should be left up to cities or the state.


Gage Skidmore / Moritz Hager via Texas Tribune

Former Gov. Rick Perry, who had called Donald Trump a "cancer on conservatism," is now endorsing the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

Perry, a former candidate who had backed U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas until he dropped out Tuesday, gave Trump his endorsement in an interview Thursday with CNN. 

Donald Trump is the apparent GOP presidential nominee after his two remaining rivals ended their White House bids.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich suspended his campaign Wednesday evening in Columbus. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz dropped out of the race Tuesday night after a disappointing loss in Indiana.

The rapid moves in the past 24 hours bring to a close a wild GOP primary season that leaves the one-time unlikely candidate as the party's apparent nominee.

Ted Cruz suspended his presidential bid Tuesday night after a disappointing Indiana loss, clearing the way for Donald Trump to be the likely Republican nominee.

"From the beginning I've said that I would continue on as long as there was a viable path to victory," Cruz told supporters gathered in the Hoosier State. "Tonight I'm sorry to say it appears that path has been foreclosed."

"With a heavy heart but with boundless optimism for the long-term future of our nation, we are suspending our campaign," he said.

The Indiana voters shook up the presidential race Tuesday night, with Ted Cruz ending his campaign after a disappointing loss to now-likely GOP nominee Donald Trump.

Bernie Sanders also bounced back after a string of primary losses with a surprise win over Hillary Clinton. But the Democrat's 5-point win still won't be enough to close the yawning gap between the two.

Cruz exit clears the way for likely Trump nomination

Political attention turns to the Hoosier State on Tuesday night, where both the Indiana Republican and Democratic presidential primary contests could be especially consequential.

Ted Cruz needs a victory over Donald Trump to stop the latter's march to the GOP nomination, but he's trailing in polls. The Democratic contest is closer, with Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton running neck and neck.

There's an important Republican Senate primary to keep an eye on, too. Here are four things we'll be watching on Tuesday night:

CruzCarly.com

When Sen. Ted Cruz announced Carly Fiorina as his vice presidential candidate last week, the campaign was ready with signs, stickers and a fancy website to announce the new team. While most campaign websites use the last name of both candidates (ObamaBiden.com, RomneyRyan.com), this one was CruzCarly.com. Why not CruzFiorina.com?

Matt Mackowiak, founder of Potomac Strategy Group in Washington D.C., has an idea.

"I guess they were worried that people couldn't correctly spell Fiorina," Mackowiak said. "Honestly, because people often mispronounce her last name, even though it's not that difficult. So I guess they made a decision that that would be easier."

Gage Skidmore via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

This week on The Ticket 2016: The Texas Tribune's Jay Root is out of town again, but there's still plenty to talk about. First, KUT's Ben Philpott will go over this week's Trump Sweep in the Northeast with Republican strategist Matt Mackowiak. Then, he'll dive into the waters of political candidate cybersquatting.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Even as a federal appeals court prepares to review the constitutionality of Texas’ controversial voter ID law, the law will remain in effect, the U.S. Supreme Court said in an order Friday.

However, noting the time-sensitive nature of the case as the November elections approach, the Supreme Court also hinted that if the full U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals hasn’t issued a definitive ruling by July 20, the justices may revisit the issue.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Former House Speaker John Boehner has never been much of a fan of U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz.

He made that clearer than ever Wednesday.

“Lucifer in the flesh,” Boehner said of Cruz during an appearance at Stanford University, according to the student newspaper. “I have Democrat friends and Republican friends. I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life."

Marhsa Miller / LBJ Library

As he addressed attendees of the Vietnam War Summit at the LBJ Library Wednesday night, Secretary of State John Kerry reflected on his time both fighting in the Vietnam War and fighting against it. Kerry's address focused on how far the country has come in achieving diplomatic relationships with Vietnam, but he also said the country still has some lessons to learn from the war. 


Ted Cruz announced Wednesday he is picking former rival Carly Fiorina as his running mate in a last-ditch move designed to shake up the GOP primary race in which he badly trails Donald Trump.

Calling his decision "one of the most solemn choices you make" as a candidate, at a rally in Indianapolis, Ind., Cruz praised Fiorina's business experience, character and past ability to stand up to the Republican front-runner.

"She doesn't get overly excited," Cruz said. "She doesn't get rattled over what is being thrown at her."

Tom "Smitty" Smith of Public Citizen says 600,000 Texas registered voters lack valid photo IDs to go to polls. Is it true? KUT's Nathan Bernier asks Gardner Selby of PolitiFact Texas.


Jay Godwin / LBJ Library

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger stopped by the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT Austin Tuesday night to talk about the Vietnam War. His appearance was part of a three-day Vietnam War Summit sponsored by the LBJ Presidential Library. Kissinger, who remains a controversial figure in American History, addressed his critics and defended his decisions.

Eric Kayne for the Texas Tribune

Donald Trump had such a big win in Pennsylvania Tuesday night that several media outlets announced him the winner just moments after the polls closed. But, unlike other states, that big win didn’t keep Texas Senator Ted Cruz from claiming a victory – of sorts.


Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took definitive steps toward solidifying their respective party's presidential nomination on Tuesday, making their rivals' task to beat them nearly insurmountable.

Trump won all five of the delegate-rich GOP primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island. Clinton notched four victories in Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, while Bernie Sanders won the Rhode Island Democratic primary.

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