maternal mortality

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

This is a final note to a three-part series on maternal deaths in Texas.

Some of you might have noticed our series on Texas’ maternal mortality crisis this week didn't address the possibility of expanding access to health care in Texas – or how expansion impacted California's crisis. There are some reasons for that.

We looked at California’s successful effort to reduce maternal mortality in the state, and how Texas could possibly replicate that model to save lives. When it’s come up in the past, public health advocates typically point to the fact that Texas has the highest rate and number of uninsured people in the country – many of who are, of course, women.

Christie Hemm Klok for KUT

Part 3 of a three-part series.

As Texas looks to reduce its maternal mortality rate, there is one aspect of the crisis that is going to be harder to solve: Black women are more likely to die while pregnant or after giving birth than women from other racial or ethnic groups.

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

Part 2 of a three-part series.

Texas officials have been slow to respond to the state's maternal mortality crisis.

In the last year, lawmakers have passed legislation aimed at improving death certificate data, and they extended the life of a task force investigating why mothers are dying. But advocates are pushing state health officials to do more.

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

Part 1 of a three-part series.

An alarming number of women die while pregnant or shortly after giving birth in Texas. According to national researchers who say the U.S. as a whole has a serious problem, Texas is an “outlier” when it comes to its high rate of maternal deaths.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Texas is over-reporting some of its maternal mortality data, a national study released today found.

The study, from the University of Maryland Population Research Center and published in the journal Birth, is a follow-up to a study released in August 2016 that found the maternal mortality rate in Texas had doubled in a two-year period.