martin luther king jr.

Darlene DeVita / Beacon Press

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Joseph Rosenbloom, author of Redemption: Martin Luther King Jr’s Last 31 Hours.

Rosenbloom was an intern at The Commercial Appeal in Memphis when King died in 1968. He talks with In Black America about the last two days of King's life, why his aides didn’t want him to go to Memphis, why James Earl Ray was in the city, and how a lapse in police security may have contributed to King's death. 

Photo courtesy of Dorceal Duckens

From Texas Standard.

Fifty years ago today, on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on a hotel balcony in Memphis. King was the preeminent leader of the American civil rights movement, and advocated nonviolent resistance to discrimination against black Americans. King had gone to Memphis to support sanitation workers who were in a labor dispute with the city.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The voice of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. echoed across the East Mall of the UT-Austin campus this morning, as hundreds gathered to honor the legacy and impact of the civil rights icon. Participants in the annual march gathered at the feet of King's statue at UT before making their way toward the Texas State Capitol and wrapping up the rally at Huston-Tillotson University in East Austin.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

Hundreds of people marched from the University of Texas campus to the state Capitol and then on to Huston-Tillotson University to celebrate the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., in Austin on Monday.

Joe Jeoffroy

When representatives from the Texas Archive of the Moving Image (TAMI) went to collect home videos to digitize in Amarillo, they were excited to see some Texas family footage – maybe a barbecue or a birth or a child's first steps.

But they were even more excited when they stumbled upon a high-quality 16mm home movie of a pivotal point in the civil rights movement: the 1965 Selma, Ala. protest march.

Amarillo resident Joe Jeoffroy brought his father's 1960s home movie collection to TAMI's video roundup to get the films digitized, and he mentioned that one of the videos might contain his father's footage from Selma. 

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