Literature

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Jabari Asim, associate professor of Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College, executive editor of The Crisis Magazine and author of ‘Only The Strong,’

Kevin O. Moone

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Janet Cheatham Bell, author, editor and publishing consultant.

After graduating from Indiana University in 1964, Bell began her professional career as a high school librarian in Saginaw, Michigan. In early 1968 she accepted a position at the Ohio University Library in Athens. A few months later, in the wake of student responses to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, the university recruited her to teach freshman composition and African American literature.

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An 18th Century play widely attributed to British playwright Lewis Theobald was actually co-written by William Shakespeare, according to two University of Texas researchers.

Through their investigation, UT psychology Professor James Pennebaker and graduate student Ryan Boyd found that the bard likely wrote the first three acts, while the final two were probably written by collaborator and fellow playwright John Fletcher. The pair determined this without even reading the play. 

“There was a conscious decision when I did this, which was ‘I want to go in and just look at the numbers to get a sense of who very likely wrote it,’” Pennebaker says. “I didn’t want to be biased by the actual words that were written.”

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Paul Lamar Hunter, author of ‘No Love, No Charity: the Success of the 19th Child.’

Though many would consider Hunter to be an unlikely candidate to become successful, his thrilling autobiographical account describes how he made it, despite overwhelming odds.

 On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Susan D. Carle, professor at American University Washington College of Law and author of ‘Defining The Struggle: National Organizing For Racial Justice 1880 to 1915.’

A couple of years ago, enthralled with the idea of salons where writers could meet, drink, and discuss their work, Owen and Jodi Egerton decided to start one of their own. At first they'd invite other writers to their home, but quickly realized that this was an event that needed sharing.

Now, Owen hosts the monthly One Page Salon at the Whip In. The first Tuesday of every month, he invites a handful of fellow artists — fiction writers, screenwriters, songwriters, even photographers and improvisers — to join him onstage and share one page of a work in progress.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Vern E. Smith, author of ‘The Jones Men.’

When Smith suggested to his editors at Newsweek Magazine that they take a look at the devastating impact of heroin on Detroit’s urban landscape back in the early 70s, he knew it was a subject that would draw attention. But what he could not have fathomed that he would turn the essence of his reporting into a novel, 'The Jones Men,' or that sometime after that a determined producer–and Detroit native Woodie King Jr. – would convince him to write a screenplay based on the book. 

    

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Cleveland Pimpton, author of "No One Left To Hate."

Can someone you've never met have an impact on your life? The answer is simply yes. This is the story of two men who share the same first name, but because of fate intervening they never meet. Separated by war and a generation apart, they both do their part to save the lives of their friends and brother in arms.  

 The spirit of one seems to live in the other. Shirley, the true love of one Malcolm and the mother of the other is the conduit that connects them. Journey with us through these pages and see how God can take the tragedies in their lives and turn them into second chances at love and life.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Quincy T. Mills, Associate Professor of History at Vassar College and author of "Cutting Along the Color Line
: Black Barbers and Barber Shops in America."

Today, black-owned barber shops play a central role in African American public life. The intimacy of commercial grooming encourages both confidentiality and camaraderie, which make the barber shop an important gathering place for African American men to talk freely.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Alexander Murray Palmer Haley. Haley’s quest to learn more about his family history resulted in his writing the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "Roots: The Sage of an American Family."

The book has been published in 37 languages, and was made into the first week-long television miniseries, viewed by an estimated 130 million people. "Roots" also generated widespread interest in genealogy.

Robin Hultgren

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Carla Kaplan, Professor of American Literature at Northeastern University and author of "Miss Anne In Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance."

Little could be more unusual in the 1920’s than for white, upper-class women to seek to become, in effect, honorary blacks. "Miss Anne in Harlem," is the first book to tell the story of a number of spirited white women who did just that: crossing race lines to play seminal roles in the great black cultural movement of the early twentieth century that came to be called the Harlem Renaissance.