Life & Arts

Food & Drink
12:59 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

As Craft Beer Starts Gushing, Its Essence Gets Watered Down

Craft breweries now make up 98 percent of all U.S. operating breweries. Of course, overall sales are still dwarfed by traditional beers.
Courtesy of the Brewers Association

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 9:19 am

There was once a time when it was easy to throw around the term "craft beer" and know exactly what you were talking about. For decades, craft was the way to differentiate small, independently owned breweries – and the beer they make – from the brewing giants like Coors, Budweiser and Pabst Blue Ribbon.

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Life & Arts
2:19 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Barstool Poetry Can Turn Anyone Into a Poet

A poem entitled "Bats, Bats, Bats" from "Barstool Poetry: Best of Austin."
Bob Makela

When things get quiet at a bar, many turn to their cell phone as a way to escape that awkward feeling.

Bob Makela hopes to change that with Barstool Poetry.

The idea began at a bar called the San Francisco Saloon in California in 1992. Makela and his roommate were having trouble working up the courage to speak to members of the opposite sex.

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Food
7:21 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

PHOTOS: After 34 Years, Austin's Tamale House Closes

A woman enters the restaurant on the final day at Tamale House #3 on Airport Blvd. Tamale House will close in the wake of owner Robert Vasquez's death.
Jon Shapley for KUT News

Customers lined up today for their last taste of tacos from Tamale House #3 on Airport Boulevard. Owner Robert "Bobby" Vasquez died last week, and the restaurant announced on Facebook it would close the location after 36 years. Tamale House East on East 6th St. will remain open.

"Everybody misses the place," said Connie Salazar, the long-time companion of Vasquez. "I'm going to miss him too."

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Music
4:50 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Yeezy Or The Bard: Who's The Best Wordsmith In Hip-Hop?

Data scientist Matt Daniels charted the vocabularies of hip-hop artists against Shakespeare and Herman Melville.
Matt Daniels

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 9:38 am

William Shakespeare had a wildly extensive vocabulary. Of more than 800,000 total words in all of his works, almost 29,000 of them are unique.

Although impressive, there are a few rappers who give the Bard a run for his money. Data scientist Matt Daniels charted the vocabularies of hip-hop artists against Shakespeare and Herman Melville.

"This is not a serious academic study. This is an, like, 'I thought it'd be cool on the Internet [project],' " he says.

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In Black America Podcast
12:14 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Remembering Ron Banks, Founder of The Dramatics

The Dramatics. Ron Banks, front row, center.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Ron Banks. Banks, singer and a founding member of the Detroit vocal group, which formed in the mid-1960s and continued to play for avid audiences around the country.

Banks’ sweet voice and smooth choreography helped distinguish the Dramatics, particularly in Detroit’s post-Motown scene of the 1970s, when the group enjoyed crossover pop success with songs such as "Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get” and “In the Rain.”

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Get Involved
5:00 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Get Involved Spotlight: Girl Scouts of Central Texas

From Girl Scouts of Central Texas, this month's Get Involved Spotlight nonprofit:

Girl Scouts is the premiere leadership organization for girls that is primarily girl-led. Girl Scouting has always been about more than cookies and camp—it’s about building the leaders of tomorrow and beacons that will improve our communities and our lives. Girl Scouting provides girls with opportunities that they may not otherwise have.

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Arts Eclectic
6:04 am
Fri May 2, 2014

See Traditional Chinese Dance at April Rain's Spring Recital

Xiwei (Sherry) Chen was born in China and grew up dancing, so when she moved to Austin, it was only natural that she'd look for a way to share traditional Chinese Dance with her new community. That's why she created the April Rain School of Chinese Dance more than a decade ago.

April Rain teaches different styles of Chinese dance, including both formal and folk dances, and in performances, the students wear costumes that Chen brings back from her return trips to her home country. Many of the students stay with the program for years, passing on their beloved costumes to the newer and younger students as they grow up.

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Life & Arts
3:47 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

'Orange Aardvark' is a Colorful Book For Kids

"It's an Orange Aardvark!" is the new book from Michael Hall. It's a short book, so we don't want to give anything away. But we can tell you it involves carpenter ants, a lot of holes and a hilarious payoff. Kirkus Reviews calls the book “suspenseful and entertaining; all-around great fun.”

The Texas Standard spoke to Hall on the phone, on a lunch break between school visits. "I enjoy the school appearances," Hall said. "The kids are so attentive and curious. They're just great audiences and it's a lot of fun."

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Arts Eclectic
3:04 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Austin's Newest Film Fest is 'Forbidden'

Next week, The Vortex will host the Forbidden Film Fest, a brand new festival that's meant to be an exploration of sexuality and eroticism in film. It's a three-day event, with a different program each night.

Night one will feature the Austin premiere of "Goodbye Gaulie Mountain," a new documentary about mountain top removal in West Virginia and the connection between land and body issues. Co-directors Annie Sprinkle and Beth Stevens will appear live via webcast.

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Food
11:05 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Austin is Making It Easier For Food Trucks to Recycle and Compost

The Korean Komfort food trailer in West Campus. Trailers and trucks in established courts can possess freestanding recycling and composting services, but under current city code, solo trucks cannot.
flickr.com/sbogdanich

Baton Creole food truck owner Lynzy Moran has been cited twice by the City of Austin for trying to be more environmentally friendly.

Once it was for collecting grease to be recycled into biodiesel. Another time it was for trying to compost food waste. Now she drives the hot oil she uses to clean her fryers from her East Sixth Street location to a commissary for disposal.

"I'm literally having to travel with hot oil in my car every night, which is also very dangerous and pretty scary," Moran says. "[I've] definitely burned myself a few times."


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Arts Eclectic
3:06 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Forklift Danceworks' 'Play Ball!' Benefits Historic Downs Field

Forklift Danceworks is known for their large scale projects, which tend to feature real people performing dances that are based on their actual jobs. They've done performances with sanitation workers ("The Trash Project") and Austin Energy employees ("PowerUP"), among others. 

Their newest project is "Play Ball!," a baseball-inspired dance which will be performed by the players and coaches of the Huston-Tillotson Rams. The dance will be performed on (and also benefit) Austin's historic Downs Field, which during its decades-long history has been home to not just the Rams, but also several semi-pro teams and at least two Negro League baseball teams. Among the many legendary ballplayers to play on the field are Satchel Paige, Willie Wells, Willie Mays, and Buck O'Neil.

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Life & Arts
12:59 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Elizabeth Crook's 'Monday Monday' Revisits UT's Infamous Tower Shooting

Elizabeth Crook, author of "Monday Monday", at the KUT Studios.
Credit Samantha Ortega for Texas Standard

There are few incidents in Texas history as compelling as the UT Tower shooting.

On August 1, 1966, a UT student and ex-marine named Charles Whitman climbed to the top of the UT Tower and opened fire on the pedestrians below. 16 people were killed. Dozens were injured. It was the first mass shooting on a US college campus. And it changed many lives.

Austin novelist Elizabeth Crook has used the events of that day to craft a vivid and emotional novel, "Monday, Monday." She told KUT's Emily Donahue that she felt some qualms about her subject matter. She began writing in 2006. And as she wrote, several school shootings occurred, from Virginia Tech to Sandy Hook.

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In Black America Podcast
12:38 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

The Legacy of African American Entrepreneurship

Dr. John S. Butler
Credit The University of Texas at Austin

  On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. John Sibley Butler, Ph.D. Butler holds the J. Marion West Chair in Constructive Capitalism and the Herb Kelleher Chair in Entrepreneurship at the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. Also, he is director of the Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship and a professor of Management and Sociology.

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Arts Eclectic
10:16 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Get Inspired at the Austin Mini Maker Faire

A few years ago, Austin was one of the homes of the annual Maker Faire, a two-day celebration of arts and crafts, creativity, and all kinds of do-it-yourself projects. The Maker Faire eventually stopped coming to Austin, but after a brief hiatus, the Austin Mini Maker Faire arrived to fill the void.

Aside from being only a one-day rather than two-day event, the Mini Maker Faire is "mini" in name only. It's still a huge event, with dozens of workshops, talks, hands-on activities, and performances taking place in the name of creativity and fun. The chief difference between the new mini fair and the old full-sized fair is that these days, most of the Makers actually hail from Austin or Central Texas locals instead of from the larger world.

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ACL Hall of Fame
7:00 am
Mon April 28, 2014

The Red Headed Stranger and Austin's 'Pride and Joy' Honored at ACL Hall of Fame

Emmy Lou Harris, Willie and Lyle Lovett perform together

Over the weekend, television’s longest running music program– Austin City Limits, celebrated the first induction ceremony for the new Austin City Limits Hall of Fame.  ACL returned to its original home at PBS’s KLRU Studio 6A Saturday evening to honor those who have left their mark on the show. The event featured more than a few famous faces.

Asked to dress Austin chic, the invitation-only crowd was, well, classically Austin. Plenty of boots, cowboy hats and jeans. Many of the women turned out in heels and dresses.  But arguably the best-dressed man in attendance was Lyle Lovett – in his signature suit and tie.

Lovett was there to honor Willie Nelson who was ACL’s first-ever inductee into the Hall of Fame.

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Life & Arts
5:33 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

'Cesar Chavez': Discussing The Movie And The Man

Cesar Chavez, co-founder of the United Farm Workers, speaks at a rally in 1977.
Cathy Murphy Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 12:01 pm

There is no music in this week's episode of Alt.Latino. Instead, we do one of our occasional "deep dives" into a subject to pursue insights and perspectives that help us think about more than music. This time around, the subject is Cesar Chavez, the recent biopic about the civil-rights activist and labor leader and the movement to unionize farm workers.

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Life & Arts
2:47 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Award-Winning UT Student Films on Display in Annual Showcase

Filmmaker Elizabeth Chatelain says she wanted to make a film about her sister's story for some time and the thesis film project for her master's program provided the opportunity to do so.
Elizabeth Chatelain

It has been a good several months for the University of Texas at Austin's Radio-Television-Film Department. Recent graduate Brian Schwarz won a Student Academy Award for his short film "Ol' Daddy," Texas Ex Elizabeth Chatelain won a prestigious documentary award for "My Sister Sarah" (story below) and now Annie Silverstein is going to Cannes with her thesis film "Skunk."

"My Sister Sarah" and "Skunk" are among the short films chosen to be highlighted in this year's Longhorn Denius Film Showcase – which features work by graduate and undergraduate students.

The showcase is free and open to the public. It starts at 6 p.m. at the Student Activity Center Auditorium on the UT campus.

Original Story (March 3, 2014): Elizabeth Chatelain graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Master’s degree from the Radio-Television-Film Department last May. In December, she won an International Documentary Association Award for her short film – "My Sister, Sarah."

The documentary follows Chatelain’s sister – Sarah – a recovering meth and crack addict who has felt true pain and tragedy. 

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Arts Eclectic
4:27 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Hear Rising Stars Play With the Austin Civic Orchestra

This Saturday night at Bates Recital Hall on the University of Texas campus, the Austin Civic Orchestra is partnering with UT's Butler School of Music to present a free spring concert. Called the "Texas Risings Stars" concert, the event will feature four award-winning UT music students playing with Austin's own non-profit orchestra.

The first half of the concert will feature music students Benjamin Penzner, Grace Youn, Roman Yearian, and Eun-Mi Lee (no relation to the host of this program) leading the orchestra in selections of their choosing. For the second half of the presentation, the orchestra will branch out on its own, featuring two pieces chosen by orchestra director Lois Ferrari.

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Why It's Not So Bad to Speak 'Bad English'
3:22 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

On the Bard's Birthday, Who Wrote It: Shakespeare or a Rapper?

Shakespeare or Big Daddy Kane? According to "Bad English" author Ammon Shea, slang and informal English is usually "much older than we think."

It's happened to all of us: just when you're ready to deliver the perfect rebuttal,  last word or final point, your tongue trips up and you slaughter your English.

Don't fret about it, says author Ammon Shea. The man who spent a year reading the Oxford English Dictionary is taking on grammarians and nitpickers alike.

Shea's new book "Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation" (out this June) is an eye-opening look at how language mistakes have become accepted as correct usage.

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Austin City Limits Fest
1:43 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

ACL Fest Organizers on What's In Store for 2014

Day one of the 2013 Austin City Limits Music Festival. This week, ACL released its lineup for the 2014 fest.
Credit Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon, KUT News

In Austin, many see live music not just as an opportunity, but as a way of life.

Every day brings the possibility to see a variety of talents – both from music’s biggest and brightest, to up-and-coming acts in Austin’s live music scene.

For many outside Central Texas, Austin’s “Live Music Capital of the World” status is summed up by two of the city’s biggest music festivals: South by Southwest and the Austin City Limits Music Festival. The latter, now in its 13th year, carries the brand of the historic Austin City Limits television show, which has a rich and storied history all its own.

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