Earthquakes

Courtesy of UT Bureau of Economic Geology

A major earthquake-monitoring network is up and running across Texas.

Thanks to an interactive website hosted by TexNet, you can now see where quakes are happening and learn about them in real time. The tool could be useful for the growing number of people who’ve felt earthquakes here.

USGS

From Texas Standard:

massive earthquake struck overnight Thursday off the southern coast of Mexico, near the states of Oaxaca and Chiapas along the Guatemalan border. At magnitude 8.1, the earthquake is the strongest to strike the country in a century, and it was felt as far away as the capital, Mexico City, some 650 miles from the epicenter. The death toll is at least 32 and may rise as the damage is assessed in some of the more remote areas affected.

Eddie Seal / Texas Tribune

The science on whether there's a link between oil and gas activity and a surge in earthquakes in Texas isn't clear-cut, says the new seismologist for the agency that regulates the industry here.

Eddie Seal / Texas Tribune

The risk of damaging manmade earthquakes striking the Dallas-Fort Worth area is substantially lower than it was last year, according to a new earthquake hazard map released this week by the U.S. Geological Survey.

There have been earthquakes in almost every corner of Texas since the start of the state's most recent oil and gas boom. One swarm that really captured people’s attention started in the town of Azle in 2013.  When oil and gas regulators at the Railroad Commission of Texas visited the town, local people suggested ways to handle the waste water disposal wells thought to be causing the quakes. One idea came up over and over again.

“Why is it we can't shut the wells down around here for a period of time?” asked resident Gale Wood. "If nothing happens after a while, that would be one way to determine what’s going on."

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