codeNEXT

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Though their reasons may differ, people on all sides of the debate are expressing frustration with the current draft of CodeNEXT, the city’s rewrite of the land development code. The rules, which are still being drafted, will govern what can be built in Austin and where it can go. 

Syeda Hasan / KUT

About two dozen visitors attended the city’s first multilingual open house on CodeNEXT, a rewrite of the city's land development code, at Hart Elementary in North Austin on Wednesday.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Nearly 100 people crammed into a backroom of a South Austin lodge to hear Mayor Steve Adler tackle some boring stuff.

Made up mostly of members of the Bouldin Creek Neighborhood Association, the audience sat in cushioned beige chairs looking at times angry, confused and tired. When the seats were full, neighbors leaned against wooden poles and sat atop tables. They listened as residents lined up in front of a mic to air concerns about CodeNEXT, the city’s attempt to rewrite a 30-year-old land development code.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin released a second draft of CodeNEXT, the city’s rewrite of its land development code, on Friday.

"The CodeNEXT code and the maps are getting better and all of the community needs to stay engaged,"  Mayor Steve Adler said.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The upcoming second draft of Austin’s new land development code is expected to eliminate one of its key zoning tools, known as "transect" zones, which focus on a building's form rather than its use.

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