CodeNEXT

After the 2012 Imagine Austin plan, the City of Austin began efforts to revamp its land development code in a process called CodeNEXT. The new code will tell us what can be built and where in Austin, and will likely determine how the city will look for decades to come. 

For more on CodeNEXT, check out the CodeNEXT Hub, a partnership that aggregates coverage from The Austin Monitor, The Austin American-Statesman, KLRU, The Austin Business Journal, The Austin Chronicle, Community Impact and KUT .

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Has a foreign government infiltrated the CodeNEXT process?

Well, no one’s saying that. But in his annual State of the City address on Tuesday, Austin Mayor Steve Adler said the "alleged Russian infiltration" on our nation’s politics has inflamed divisions across the country – and highlighted rifts at the local level, as well.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Hispanic families in Central Texas don’t have the same opportunities to access health care, employment and early childhood education, according to a new report from the Austin Community Foundation.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

The City of Austin has released its third draft of CodeNEXT, the ongoing overhaul of the rules governing what can be built where. Staff held an open house Monday at City Hall on the proposed land development code, inviting residents to view the new zoning maps and ask questions.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Less than a week out from the release of the latest version of CodeNEXT, city commissions are weighing in on what they’d like to see in this latest draft of Austin’s land development code.

The Zoning and Platting Commission laid out its plan last night for gathering public feedback on the new rules, which would regulate everything from parking requirements to the types of housing that can be built in Austin. Commissioners want to hold at least two public meetings in different parts of town, possibly holding a combined hearing with the city’s Planning Commission.

Pages