Civil Rights

Darlene Devita / Beacon Press

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Joseph Rosenbloom, author of Redemption: Martin Luther King Jr’s Last 31 Hours.

Rosenbloom was an intern at The Commercial Appeal in Memphis when King died in 1968. He talks with In Black America about the Lorraine Hotel, King's "From The Mountain" speech, the Poor People’s Campaign, and the historical momentum that was lost on April 4, 1968.

Darlene DeVita / Beacon Press

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Joseph Rosenbloom, author of Redemption: Martin Luther King Jr’s Last 31 Hours.

Rosenbloom was an intern at The Commercial Appeal in Memphis when King died in 1968. He talks with In Black America about the last two days of King's life, why his aides didn’t want him to go to Memphis, why James Earl Ray was in the city, and how a lapse in police security may have contributed to King's death. 

The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

From Texas Standard.

When Heman Sweatt applied to the University of Texas at Austin Law School in 1946, he was automatically rejected because he was black. He sued, and the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices ruled unanimously in his favor, and Sweatt became the first black student at the UT Law School.

But his enrollment was just the beginning of a long struggle to integrate the school.

Colin M. Lenton

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Amy Hill Hearth, journalist and author of Streetcar to Justice: How Elizabeth Jennings Won the Right to Ride in New York.

Hearth talks about Elizabeth Jennings’ refusal to leave a segregated streetcar in Manhattan, how the African-American community of New York came together to fight segregation in public transportation, and how a future president represented Jennings in court.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents a tribute to the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Featured on the program are former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, former President Barack Obama, and D’ Army Bailey.

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