campus carry

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Members of the University of Texas System Board of Regents met Thursday expecting to approve new rules for guns on their 14 campuses. Instead, they raised new worries about the proposed guidelines and signaled intent to try to change them, especially at the flagship UT Austin.

In a 45-minute discussion, regents became bogged down in debate over issues like trigger guards, bullets in gun chambers, and if and how faculty should be able to ban weapons in their individual offices. Practically every regent seemed to have a unique opinion. A consensus seemed out of reach. Ultimately, the regents delayed a vote on the issue and will take it up again at a future meeting.

Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

Across Texas, universities are preparing to make concealed handguns a part of campus life. The Senate bill known as campus carry, signed into law by Gov. Greg Abbott in June 2015, takes effect the first of August. Under the law, public universities have only some power to regulate where guns are allowed on campus.

The University of Texas at Austin has been bolder than other state schools in designating gun-free zones, and the school is feeling the heat from pro-gun student groups.


Pu Ying-Huang/KUT News

The University of Texas is preparing to search for a new Dean for its Architecture School. Outgoing Dean Fritz Steiner recently announced he was leaving his post ahead of a new statewide law allowing permitted gun owners to carry a concealed handgun on campus.  

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/Texas Tribune

The University of Texas at Austin's longtime architecture dean announced on Thursday he is leaving, saying the state's new campus carry law played a major role in pushing him out. 

Todd Wiseman for the Texas Tribune

Save for some narrow exceptions, guns will be allowed in classrooms but not in dorms at the University of Texas at Austin next school year under guidelines issued by university President Greg Fenves on Wednesday.

Weinberg photo via Flickr/Larry D. Moore (CC BY-SA 3.0), Protest photos credit Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

On Monday, University of Texas at Austin professor Steven Weinberg said a faculty meeting that despite campus carry legislation, he would not be allowing guns in his classroom when the law takes effect in August.

Since then, he's become something of an unlikely leader in the campus carry debate, the Texas Tribune reports.

Weinberg spoke to the Standard about his opposition to campus carry and how he's willing to fight it.

 


Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From The Texas Tribune: A Nobel Prize-winning physicist at the University of Texas at Austin declared Monday that he will try to ban guns from his classroom this fall, even if university rules and state law say he can't. 

Photo illustration by Todd Wiseman

Texas universities would violate the state's new campus carry law if they banned guns in dormitories, Attorney General Ken Paxton said in a non-binding opinion issued Monday afternoon. 

That opinion goes against recommendations made by a task force at the University of Texas at Austin, which suggested banning guns in dorms in a report to university President Greg Fenves earlier this month. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

A handful of gun rights activists laid down on the ground and doused themselves in ketchup, pretending to fall victim to pistols made from cereal boxes as, about two blocks away, a crowd of about 100 protesters waved dildos and noisemakers in the air.

Other than that, it was just a normal Saturday on the University of Texas at Austin campus, where most students were busy studying for exams.

Image via Flickr/Texas.713 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard: After the Sandy Hook shooting, President Obama and his colleagues in Congress pushed to close what they call a loophole in background checks. They were not successful. The word loophole, it should be noted, is a political term, primarily used by advocates of gun control who say there's a gap in the law when it comes to the sale or transfer of guns between private citizens.

A group asked to provide UT Austin President Greg Fenves with recommendations to implement the state's new campus carry law said UT Austin should not prohibit concealed handguns from classrooms, but should prohibit handguns from ticketed sporting events, laboratories and on-campus residence halls, with some exceptions. 


Jennifer Whitney via Texas Tribune

The UT Austin campus is not open to hold the planned make-believe mass shooting this weekend by campus carry activists, the University said in a statement released Wednesday afternoon. 

Updated: Come and Take It Texas posted on facebook Wednesday evening that, after getting UT Austin's message about not trespassing on its campus, would meet with "the Dean of UT" Thursday to do a walkthrough of the group's planned location. 


KUT News

Faculty members at the University of Texas at Austin have approved a measure calling for banning guns in classrooms, labs, dorms and university offices under the state’s campus carry law.

The law, SB 11, goes into effect in August of next year. People with concealed handgun licenses will be able to carry a gun on a campus, as they already can, but schools can set some limits to where exactly they can bring them in. The UT Faculty Council says it doesn’t want them in classrooms. UT Professor Carolyn Brown at the College of Pharmacy is a member of the Council and says she and her colleagues voted unanimously to oppose guns in education spaces.

Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

Both public and private colleges in Texas are in the process of deciding how to implement a new law that allows licensed gun owners to bring their handguns on to campuses. Two schools – Texas Christian University and Texas State University – have recently taken up implementing the law before it goes into effect in August 2016.


Image via Flickr/ARTS_fox1fire (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A group made up of professors, and a few others, rallied behind their common goal of a gun-free UT on Monday at the University of Texas at Austin. This pushback against a state campus carry law passed last session has been building for months. The new law is set to take effect next year.

The protesters' message was loud and clear: ban guns or we could sue. Law professor Ken Williams from South Texas College of Law in Houston says their main claim will center around how universities will ensure a safe environment for both students and faculty.

 


Pu Ying-Huang/KUT News

The University of Texas at Austin continues to discuss the issue of allowing concealed firearms throughout the campus as per the campus carry law, which was passed in the 2015 legislative session and signed into law by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.

Pu Ying-Huang/KUT News

An economics professor at the University of Texas says he won’t return to teach next fall because of the state’s new campus carry law.

Microeconomics Professor Daniel Hamermesh says he only planned to stay at UT-Austin for a couple more fall semesters anyway, but he says getting new professors to come here will be the problem.

Pu Ying-Huang/KUT News

The University of Texas at Austin held its second and final public forum on how the school should implement a new state law that will allow concealed handgun license holders to bring their weapon onto college campuses. But, while efforts to allow weapons on campus has come to prominence in recent years, the push in Texas began over 20 years ago after a mass shooting in Killeen.

flickr/pitmanra

UT Austin is holding its first of two public forums tonight as it decides how to comply with the new law that allows concealed weapons on college campuses in Texas. Public universities must comply with the law, which goes into effect August 1, 2016, but private universities can opt out. Still, there is plenty of uncertainty for private institutions going through the opt-out process.


KUT News

A new state law allowing people to carry concealed handguns on Texas public university campuses has sparked an outcry from some students, staff and faculty at UT Austin.

A working group set up by the university will hold two public meetings on the new law, as it sets out guidelines for implementing it. Still, there's a lot of confusion over what the law does and doesn’t allow.


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