Mose Buchele

Senior Reporter, StateImpact Texas

Mose Buchele is the Austin-based broadcast reporter for KUT's NPR partnership StateImpact Texas . He has been on staff at KUT 90.5  since 2009, covering local and state issues.  Mose has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

Ways to Connect

Flickr/loozrboy

From StateImpact Texas: President Obama’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline provoked cheers from environmental groups, boos from rival politicians and a little bit of head scratching in the State of Texas. 


mrjoro/flickr

This is a story of two nuts: the almond and the pecan. 

In the 1960s the pecan industry loomed large over the almond. But, then, something changed. Since then, the almond crop has seen a nearly 33-fold growth, while the pecan crop has seen little to no growth. But things are looking up for the once-proud pecan.


sterlic/flickr

Flooding last week caused untreated wastewater to end up in creeks around Austin.  In fact, wastewater seems to end up overflowing almost anytime the region experiences a major storm. 


Mose Buchele/KUT

Hundreds are displaced in Bastrop County after flooding that began in Travis and Hays counties on Friday. The emergency is a reminder that floods don’t stop just because the rain does. 


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

If you spend much time around Austin this sight might be familiar: A new building goes up, or a street is completely redesigned. Along with that development a row of young trees is planted along the sidewalk. Then, several months later, some of those trees are dead.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

The Hidden Pines wildfire in Bastrop is now 80 percent contained, but just how do officials reach that determination? Well, it’s an art and a science.


KUT News

The Environmental Protection Agency has released new rules to reduce ozone pollution.  The Austin area has managed to stay on the right side of current rules, but the new standards will be harder to meet.


Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

This week the US Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce new limits on the amount of ozone Americans breathe. Those limits could force Austin and other Texas cities to reduce ground-level ozone pollution in an effort to mitigate the pollutant’s harmful health effects.


Wikimedia Commons

It might sound surprising that the U.S. does not allow the export of one of its most valuable and plentiful natural resources — but in the case of crude oil, it's true.

A lot of Texas politicians would like to see the ban overturned, and soon lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives may vote on just that.  But why is there a ban in the first place?

Todd Wiseman / Karolina Michalak / Felipe Hadler/Texas Tribune

For some low income families in Texas, access to childcare is not possible without state assistance.  The Texas Workforce Commission, the state agency in charge of instituting a low-income childcare program, is looking for feedback on how it’s doing in a series of public forums.


flickr.com/hellboy_93

Fans of the Texan pop star Selena Quintanilla-Pérez got a treat this week. 

Twenty years after her shooting death, and after years of requests from fans, the singer's family released an early demo of the previously unheard song, "Oh No (I'll Never Fall in Love Again)."


Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

Texas Governor Greg Abbott is back from his first official trip to Mexico. While he was there, the governor met Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and talked border security, trade and energy. As KUT’s Mose Buchele reports, cross-border energy issues are of growing importance on both sides of the border.


sarowen/flickr

The Texas horned lizard — also known as the horny toad, or the horned frog to TCU fans — lives in some of the harshest deserts in the Southwest.  But scientists are learning more about how the lizard survives, and what they’ve discovered could have applications for the rest of us.


KUT News

A new state law allowing people to carry concealed handguns on Texas public university campuses has sparked an outcry from some students, staff and faculty at UT Austin.

A working group set up by the university will hold two public meetings on the new law, as it sets out guidelines for implementing it. Still, there's a lot of confusion over what the law does and doesn’t allow.


Reshma Kirpalani/KUT News

After an historic amount of rain this spring, as well as a hot and dry summer in Austin and across Central Texas, the Highland Lakes are looking good.

With August behind us and Labor Day here, the lakes combined are 75 percent full.


Eddie Seal/Texas Tribune

An inquiry by the agency that regulates the oil and gas industry in Texas has found that oil and gas activity did not likely cause a swarm of earthquakes around the north Texas towns of Azle and Reno starting in 2013. The finding, however, flies in the face of a peer-reviewed scientific study of the quakes.


Photo by KUT News

There’s no shortage of people who oppose the prospect of the general public carrying firearms on the University of Texas campus. UT-Austin and public universities across Texas are trying to balance those concerns against the Legislature’s mandate. At a rally yesterday, chants of “Gun Free UT!” were mingled with displays from supporters of the “campus carry” law.

Filipa Rodrigues/KUT News

Sure, Austin revels in its youthful reputation, but a lot of the people coming here are probably not fresh-out-of-college looking to form a band or a startup.

A new look at income migration from the IRS shows that newly-arrived Austinites aren’t as young as previously thought. What’s more, the highest concentration of transplants isn't from either of the tried-and-true drivers of Austin population growth, New York and California. They’re from Florida.

Mose Buchele/KUT

Oil closed at its lowest price in more than six years yesterday and, while it’s risen slightly since then, some project the price to drop even further

In some parts of Texas that's bad news for almost everyone. The economic ripple effect of low prices has led to layoffs and slammed the brakes on local economies.  But there’s one business that’s going through a boom in the oil patch right now: the repo man.

Mose Buchele/KUT News

Even before oil prices plummeted last year, the town of Alice, Texas was feeling the pain caused by a restless oil industry. Some oilfield service companies had moved operations from Alice, located near Corpus Christi, to places deeper in the Eagle Ford Shale. That cost the town jobs and tax revenue. Then, starting around Thanksgiving, the value of Texas crude dropped by more than half. More layoffs came, and the real trouble started.

"A lot of people are in depression right now. And in denial," says Bonnie Whitley, volunteer coordinator at the Alice Food Pantry. "They just can’t come to grips with what’s happened. So there’s depression and we really need some good counselors down here. Which we don’t have…”

Pages