Mose Buchele

Senior Reporter, Energy & Environment

Mose is KUT's energy and environment reporter, previously under the StateImpact Texas project. He has been on staff at KUT since 2009, covering local and state issues.  He's has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

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flickr/smreilly

The low gas prices a lot of us are enjoying when we fill up our cars are thanks, in part, to a glut in the global supply of oil.  In fact there’s so much crude oil being pumped right now that it's created a traffic jam in an unlikely place.


Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Texas Tribune

Natural gas, coal, wind are the resources that usually come to mind when we think about power generation in Texas. But a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey estimates Texas has enough uranium underground to power nuclear plants across the country for five years.

The USGS assessment found a 60-million-ton concentration of unmined uranium oxide embedded in sandstone under the Texas Coastal Plain – a deposit that, if developed, the agency estimates could supply a year’s worth of power to U.S. nuclear reactors.


Staff Sgt. James L. Harper, Jr., USAF, via flickr/chucksimmins

Over seven years after hurricanes Ike and Dolly devastated the Texas coast, $3.1 billion in federal disaster relief remains unspent. It's a number that recently became a point of focus at a state Senate Committee hearing on disaster recovery.


Courtesy: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

In some part of the world, including a site near the Texas-New Mexico border, nuclear waste is kept in rock salt deposits deep underground.  It’s long been thought that these geologic formations were some of the safest places to store humankind’s most toxic waste, but new research suggests those places may not be as safe as we thought.


UT Austin

A team of scientists at UT Austin has brought us closer to understanding how some animals turn almost invisible in certain lights by studying fish deep in the ocean.


UT Austin

Engineers at UT Austin have created a new kind of gel that can repair and reconnect electronic circuits. KUT's Mose Buchele reports on possible applications, from smarter smart phones to self-healing robot armies. 

Mose Buchele/KUT

Austin’s creeks and waterways are part of what’s attracted people to this part of the world for thousands of years.  But, of course, they also create flooding hazards. When one heavy rain on top of another sends tons of debris into the creeks, that flood risk becomes even more difficult to control.

KUT News

There’s an old rancher’s saying that the cattle always look good around an oil well.  It means if the ranch is making money leasing to oil companies, the ranch's finances are probably in pretty good shape. So, is the decline in oil hurting Texas ranchers? That’s something state lawmakers are trying to figure out.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Public safety officials and researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have unveiled a new national flood prediction system, which researchers say will increase the amount of river and creek flood forecasts by more than 700 percent and offer a new approach that will save lives in Central Texas and beyond. 


Flickr/loozrboy

From StateImpact Texas: President Obama’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline provoked cheers from environmental groups, boos from rival politicians and a little bit of head scratching in the State of Texas. 


mrjoro/flickr

This is a story of two nuts: the almond and the pecan. 

In the 1960s the pecan industry loomed large over the almond. But, then, something changed. Since then, the almond crop has seen a nearly 33-fold growth, while the pecan crop has seen little to no growth. But things are looking up for the once-proud pecan.


sterlic/flickr

Flooding last week caused untreated wastewater to end up in creeks around Austin.  In fact, wastewater seems to end up overflowing almost anytime the region experiences a major storm. 


Mose Buchele/KUT

Hundreds are displaced in Bastrop County after flooding that began in Travis and Hays counties on Friday. The emergency is a reminder that floods don’t stop just because the rain does. 


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

If you spend much time around Austin this sight might be familiar: A new building goes up, or a street is completely redesigned. Along with that development a row of young trees is planted along the sidewalk. Then, several months later, some of those trees are dead.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

The Hidden Pines wildfire in Bastrop is now 80 percent contained, but just how do officials reach that determination? Well, it’s an art and a science.


KUT News

The Environmental Protection Agency has released new rules to reduce ozone pollution.  The Austin area has managed to stay on the right side of current rules, but the new standards will be harder to meet.


Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

This week the US Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce new limits on the amount of ozone Americans breathe. Those limits could force Austin and other Texas cities to reduce ground-level ozone pollution in an effort to mitigate the pollutant’s harmful health effects.


Wikimedia Commons

It might sound surprising that the U.S. does not allow the export of one of its most valuable and plentiful natural resources — but in the case of crude oil, it's true.

A lot of Texas politicians would like to see the ban overturned, and soon lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives may vote on just that.  But why is there a ban in the first place?

Todd Wiseman / Karolina Michalak / Felipe Hadler/Texas Tribune

For some low income families in Texas, access to childcare is not possible without state assistance.  The Texas Workforce Commission, the state agency in charge of instituting a low-income childcare program, is looking for feedback on how it’s doing in a series of public forums.


flickr.com/hellboy_93

Fans of the Texan pop star Selena Quintanilla-Pérez got a treat this week. 

Twenty years after her shooting death, and after years of requests from fans, the singer's family released an early demo of the previously unheard song, "Oh No (I'll Never Fall in Love Again)."


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