Mose Buchele

Senior Reporter, Energy & Environment

Mose is KUT's energy and environment reporter, previously under the StateImpact Texas project. He has been on staff at KUT since 2009, covering local and state issues.  He's has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

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Austin Price for KUT

The Eliza Springs Amphitheater sits like an abandoned ruin near the Zilker Zephyr train station by Barton Springs Pool. The oval-shaped, open-air gallery was built into the ground in 1903 near Eliza Spring – one of the four springs feeding into what we know as Barton Springs. Over the last year, the city has been renovating the relic to accommodate its endangered inhabitants.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

The weather was good for the funeral. The sunset painted the Port Aransas sky in pinks, yellows and blues. The breeze off the Gulf cut the humidity. The crowd of 60 or so on the beach was dressed eclectically. Some wore t-shirts and swimsuits, others traditional black. They were all there to mourn Tony Amos. They would do it in a way that, probably, no man had been mourned before.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

It wasn’t just people who found themselves displaced after Hurricane Harvey flooded parts of Texas. Animals escaped the floodwaters, as well – and not just run-of-the-mill house pets.

The Austin Zoo recently took in a tiger, two lions, and a family of tamarin monkeys – all rescued from the Texas Zoo in Victoria, Texas, which flooded after Hurricane Harvey.

Mose Buchele / KUT

A hiring freeze for most state jobs hurt Texas’ ability to help victims of Hurricane Harvey, the state employees union says.

Gov. Greg Abbott ordered the hiring freeze earlier this year to save money. At Texas Health and Human Services, that meant 600 vacancies for “eligibly workers” went unfilled, union President Judy Lugo said.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Right now, an army of FEMA home inspectors is working its way through parts of Texas decimated by Hurricane Harvey. The inspectors are recording information that will help the government decide who gets disaster aid and how much. But the way that money is distributed has come under fire.

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