Mose Buchele

Senior Reporter, StateImpact Texas

Mose Buchele is the Austin-based broadcast reporter for KUT's NPR partnership StateImpact Texas . He has been on staff at KUT 90.5  since 2009, covering local and state issues.  Mose has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

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Weather
9:14 pm
Sat May 23, 2015

Dangerous Weather Conditions Expected Through Sunday

Lightning over Austin, 2009.
Credit Photo by Phil Ostroff courtesy of https://www.flickr.com/photos/jessicareeder/3619018581/

The National Weather Service is reminding Central Texans to watch out for floods and tornados into Sunday as a storm system rolls through the region.

Record flooding is expected along the Blanco River in Wimberley.

The Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for Central Texas counties including Travis, Hays and Williamson counties (a full list of counties can be found here) until 2:15 a.m. Sunday. A flash flood watch continues into Sunday evening.  Updates can be found at the National Weather Service here. 

There is also a tornado watch in effect for many counties including Travis, Williamson, Bastrop, and Caldwell until 3:00 AM Sunday. Full list and updates here

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Austin
11:16 am
Mon May 18, 2015

El Niño Brings May Showers, But Will It Bring Drought Relief?

Austin’s received 8.97 inches through May 17, compared to 7.09 inches of rainfall in the entire month of May last year.
Dean Terry/flickr

For the past year, forecasters have been watching the Pacific Ocean with bated breath, waiting for the weather pattern known as El Niño to arrive.

Well, it’s here, but it’s not like anything we’ve seen before.

When you hear or read reports about the oft-elusive weather system, you can’t help but think of Chris Farley’s classic skit from “Saturday Night Live.”

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Energy & Environment
3:38 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Plan to Clean Up San Marcos River Could Mean You Pay More for Tubing

Safety and environmental concerns along the San Marcos River prompted the state senate to pass a bill that could create a fee system for river recreation.
Patrick Lewis/flickr

Each year, more than 80,000 people visit the San Marcos River to tube (or "toob") the waters and have a good time. But those crowds leave a lot of litter and create safety concerns for local law enforcement. Now a bill at the state senate aims to solve the problem.

Senate Bill 234 would let voters in Caldwell and Guadalupe counties set up a “recreation district” on the river downstream of San Marcos that would be funded by fees charged to river revelers. The district would have the authority to hire law enforcement to patrol the water and crack down on litter.

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Science
4:48 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

How GPS Technology Could Help Scientists Build a Holodeck

It's still a ways off, but UT researchers say that their improved GPS technology coupled with a virtual reality headset could create a holodeck-like experience.
intel.com

If you use your smartphone for directions, you know how annoying it can be when the tracking device gets your locations wrong. Now a team of researchers at the University of Texas’ Cockrell School of Engineering say they may have fixed that problem.

But there’s more: They also think they’ve brought a science fiction dream closer to reality.

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Energy & Environment
10:32 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Could Texas Be Doing More to Protect Against Manmade Earthquakes?

A dozen smaller earthquakes have struck Dallas in the last few weeks, following a SMU study that showed a connection between disposal well sites and earthquakes.

There have been earthquakes in almost every corner of Texas since the start of the state's most recent oil and gas boom. One swarm that really captured people’s attention started in the town of Azle in 2013.  When oil and gas regulators at the Railroad Commission of Texas visited the town, local people suggested ways to handle the waste water disposal wells thought to be causing the quakes. One idea came up over and over again.

“Why is it we can't shut the wells down around here for a period of time?” asked resident Gale Wood. "If nothing happens after a while, that would be one way to determine what’s going on."

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Energy & Environment
10:38 am
Thu April 16, 2015

How Austin Gardeners Can Unearth the Mysteries of Their Own Backyards

Clarence Jackson, an Environmental Scientest from the EPA, tests soil with an X-ray fluorescence analyzer as a part of The Soil Kitchen, a three-day opportunity for backyard gardeners to receive free soil tests in Austin.
Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT News

The City of Austin recently offered free soil testing so people could see what contaminants and nutrients they have in their yards. But, so many people wanted the testing – myself included – that the city was overwhelmed with samples.

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Energy & Environment
4:01 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Texas Haze, The ‘War on Coal,’ and How Lawsuits Shape Environmental Policy

Photographer Melton says that there are days at Big Bend when haze, partially from coal power plants, makes it tough to photograph.
Mary Ann Melton

One week remains for the public to comment on an Environmental Protection Agency proposal to reduce smog in one of Texas most beloved national parks. The EPA's plan to limit so-called 'regional haze' is one of a slew of new air quality rules that have critics accusing the Agency of waging a 'war on coal.' The reality, of course, is more complicated.

To see how, look no farther than the hazy skies over Far West Texas.

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Energy & Environment
4:16 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

How 'Miss Piggy' Helps Scientists Study Oil and Gas Field Emissions from Above

Researchers fly in planes over Texas to gather data about pollution resulting from oil and gas extraction.
Mose Buchele/KUT News

This week, a team of scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – NOAA – has been flying high over Texas, gathering data.

The flights are part of a project to find out exactly how emissions from the state’s sprawling oil and gas fields pollute the air we breathe.

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Austin
9:27 am
Tue April 7, 2015

Sex, Drugs and Plant Biology: Why Everything is Covered in Green Gunk

This time of year the oak trees in Austin shed their pollen, covering the city in a sort of green gunk.
KUT News

Every spring clouds of green pollen descend on Austin, bringing misery to allergy-suffering public radio reporters like me and frustrating drivers like DeAunderia Bowens.

"You know I just got my car washed and literally got up the next morning and my car was covered with this green stuff!" she said on her way to work. "If I had a green car it would be alright, but clearly not working on a grey vehicle.”

This time of year the stuff is oak pollen, but why does its get everywhere? The answer might make you look at trees a little differently.

It turns out we are surrounded by tree sex.

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Energy & Environment
8:01 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Texans Can Expect Vibrant Spring Wildflowers, Expert Says, Though They May Arrive a Bit Late

Experts are anticipating a colorful wildflower season in Texas this year.
Callie Hernandez/KUT News

Experts say this wildflower season might be one of the best in years, but we’ll have to wait a little longer than usual to find out.

That's because a cooler-than-normal March has postponed the blooming season. 

Texas
7:53 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Will Texas Abolish Daylight Saving Time?

A map of daylight saving time use across the world — countries in blue still use the time-switch, those in orange previously used DST and those in red have never enacted a time-switch.
Wikimedia Commons

Like many across the world, you may have come into work late this week because of daylight saving time. Yesterday, lawmakers heard testimony on a bill that could end the “spring forward” clock change once and for all in Texas.

State Rep. Dan Flynn (R-Canton) says there are a lot of myths about daylight saving time. He says farmers don’t really care for it, and that it doesn’t seem to conserve energy. He even says there are studies showing more car accidents and heart attacks following the clock change.

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Energy & Environment
2:05 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Here's Why People Are Blaming Refineries For Higher Gas Prices

Drivers have noticed the cost of gasoline inching up lately.
Eric Reyna/KUT News

You might have noticed gas prices inching up, but crude oil prices are still waaaay lower than they were a year ago – so what’s behind the jump in gasoline?  Usually, higher prices at the pump are linked to the higher cost of crude oil. But at this time of year, people blame refineries.  

"What we’re seeing is that strong relationship between gas and oil fade," says Patrick Dehane, an oil analyst with Gasbuddy.com. "It is… I wouldn’t say a nasty breakup. But the two are becoming more distant because of refining.” 

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Austin
9:31 am
Thu March 5, 2015

This Dam Holds in Lady Bird Lake. So When Will It Get ‘Essential’ Repairs?

The city of Austin is struggling to find a long-term solution for the repairs needed to fix Longhorn Dam.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

The poor condition of the dam that holds in the waters of Austin’s beloved Lady Bird Lake continues to vex city officials.  Emails obtained in a public information request reveal challenges the city faced in performing maintenance on Longhorn Dam, which crosses the Colorado River beneath Pleasant Valley Road. Documents tell of water lost through the dam’s gates that could potentially stay in upstream reservoirs, and show city departments struggling to assign responsibility for the structure and plan a long-term solution.

Austin Energy, the city-owned electric utility, and the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) have long known about the need for work on the dam. Austin Energy is the city department that operates the structure. The LCRA operates dams upstream from Austin and coordinates with Austin Energy when they release water downstream.

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Austin
3:56 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

How Many Austinites Will Register Their Short-Term Rentals Before SXSW?

A map shows the parts of town where no more permits are available for non-owner occupied short-term rental spaces. Those are the spaces colored in red.
Credit City of Austin

South by Southwest is coming up. That means a crush of visitors and extra cash in the pockets of people renting space to those visitors.  But the City of Austin has a message for potential short-term landlords: You've got to register your home by Feb. 28th if you hope to rent the space legally.

"Before every major event we see a number of applicants that come into our office," says Marcus Elliot with the Austin Code Department. "They're really interested in that last-minute rush to try to get the license." 

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Energy & Environment
9:35 am
Wed February 11, 2015

EPA Team Looking At Relationship Between Quakes and Disposal Well

Philip Dellinger is head of the EPA’s Underground Injection Control Section for Region 6 in Dallas.
Credit Philip Issa/KUT News

The earthquakes that have shaken Dallas and Irving, Texas the last several months have people looking into whether oil and gas activity in the area plays a role.  Some of those people work at the Environmental Protection Agency. But EPA researchers say they’re not getting the data they’ve requested from Texas state oil and gas regulators to investigate the link.

Philip Dellinger is head of the EPA’s Underground Injection Control Section in Dallas.  At a conference of the Groundwater Protection Council on Tuesday, he showed early results from a study his team conducted on earthquakes around Irving.

The group looked at the use of waste water disposal wells closest to Irving earthquakes. Dellinger does not necessarily believe the recent quakes are related to disposal wells, where waste water from oil and gas drilling is pumped underground. But these types of wells have caused other earthquakes, so his team wanted to see what wells were close to the Irving events.

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Energy & Environment
11:55 am
Fri January 30, 2015

Financial Markets Betting On Keystone XL Construction

Credit shannonpatrick17/flickr

The financial markets may be betting that the Keystone XL pipeline is a done deal.

The U.S. House and Senate have now both passed bills to force approval of the controversial pipeline.  The southern leg of the project already delivers oil from Cushing, Oklahoma to the Texas Gulf Coast. But approval of the full build-out would link existing pipe to the Canadian border, allowing more crude from the tar sands of Canada to reach Texas refineries via Cushing.

President Obama has vowed to veto the bills, but one expert says the fate of the project may already be written in futures contracts for crude oil.

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Energy & Environment
1:28 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Quiz: Beer, Coffee, or Crude Oil? Sometimes It's Hard to Tell

Credit Amanda/flickr

Anyone who spends time looking at how oil is drilled for and refined around the world comes to notice something strange. The names people give to different types of crude oil can sound surprisingly delicious.

In reporting on the role that benchmark oil prices play in moving the price of gasoline,  I was introduced to one person who had made a game out of it. Rice University student Aruni Ranaweera created the quiz "Beer, Coffee, Crude" to test her classmates' ability to distinguish between types of crude, types of beer, and blends of coffee.  It's harder than is sounds. Go ahead, crack open a can of Tia Juana Light and give it a shot.

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Energy & Environment
11:12 am
Wed January 21, 2015

Texas Earthquake Risk Levels To Increase In New USGS Map

The current map delineates "non-tectonic" quake activity in areas where man-made earthquakes have been studied.
Courtesy of USGS

A seismic hazard map is essentially what it sounds like: a map that shows the potential for earthquakes in certain areas. The maps give people a sense of the likelihood of earthquakes occurring, where they might occur, and how strong they might be.  The maps can influence everything from public policy to building codes to insurance rates.

“They govern hundreds of billions of dollars in constructions and insurance cost every year,” says Mark Peterson, project chief of the USGS’s National Seismic Hazard Mapping project.

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Energy & Environment
12:34 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

Why Mom-and-Pop Gas Stations Are Often First to Slash Gas Prices

Al Mak is a manager at Pronto Food Mart. They offer some of the lowest gas prices in central Austin.
Credit Mose Buchele/KUT News

By now, the initial surprise over low gas prices has worn off. But people looking for the very best deals might have noticed a trend: Small, unbranded gas stations are often the first to cut prices when the price of crude oil falls. Many continue to stay competitive even when larger brand-name stations start cutting their prices as well.

Take Pronto Food Mart. It’s a tiny neighborhood gas station that was one of the first places in Austin to slash prices. It still offers the cheapest gas in Central Austin according to GasBuddy.com.

Shopkeepers at Pronto pride themselves on being on the front lines of the war against high gas prices.

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Energy & Environment
5:05 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Earthquakes Are New, But Not Unique, To Dallas Area

Credit OLIVER BERG/DPA/LANDOV

People in Dallas were surprised by a swarm of small earthquakes that started shaking the city a couple of days ago. There have been 11 by last count.  And the quakes, though new to the Dallas area, are just the most recent in a major upsurge in earthquakes in Texas over the last few years.

Earthquakes were pretty much unheard of in the Dallas area until 2008. Since then there have been a lot of these swarms of quakes. In Irving, Texas, where this new cluster is located, there have been more than 50 in the last several years, according to the city manager. This current swarm started around September.

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