Mose Buchele

Senior Reporter, StateImpact Texas

Mose Buchele is the Austin-based broadcast reporter for KUT's NPR partnership StateImpact Texas . He has been on staff at KUT 90.5  since 2009, covering local and state issues.  Mose has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

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Mose Buchele for KUT News

Cattle rustlers have been both reviled and mythologized in Texas since there was cattle on the range. Now, the downturn in oil prices may be giving rise to a new kind of criminal in South Texas: oil rustlers.


Wikimedia Commons

If there’s one bit of conventional wisdom when to comes to oil prices it’s this: What goes down, must go up. The boom-bust cycle of the oil markets means that the cheap gas you’re enjoying now will cost you more sometime in the future. But what if low oil prices are actually the new normal? Some people are saying just that.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Last month KUT asked our audience to suggest stories they wanted us to report on. The story that listeners chose is about Austin’s African American population.  Specifically, why is it shrinking, while every other group in the city grows?  In the first installment of a project we’re calling ATXplained, KUT’s Mose Buchele reports. 

Photo via flickr/MarcDalio; photo illustration by Andrew Weber/KUT

It’s been a few weeks since Congress lifted a decades-long ban on crude oil exports, but something that often gets lost in talking about the end of the ban is that not all oil is created equally.

Oil from one place might have has more sulfur or more impurities than oil from another place; you might hear it called “heavy” or “light” crude. The differences have a big effect on what that oil can be used for, but explaining those differences can be, well, boring. But The Wall Street Journal's Russell Gold says he has a much more interesting corollary that might help illustrate those differences: alcohol.


Andrew Weber/KUT

The emotional bond between a human and an animal can be hard to explain.

A lot of people are skeptical if you talk about your dog or cat like a member of the family. It’s even harder when the animal is not your typical pet, and even harder still when that pet goes missing. 


Mengwen Cao/KUT

Over the last month you’ve probably seen plenty of roadside trees decked out for the holidays, and not just in peoples’ front yards. Sometimes it’s trees on public land that get the Christmas treatment, but that can make clean up a challenge on one Austin road now that the holidays are over. 


www.audio-luci-store.it/flickr

New Year's resolutions tend to fall into just a few categories. But after losing weight and eating better, resolving to become a better public speaker tends to make the list. Now, new research suggests how well a speech or presentation is perceived might not have as much do with the presentation itself as you think.


NASA, via Getty Images

Texas is winding down a year of extreme weather. A lot of it is attributed to the El Niño weather pattern that pushes more moisture in our direction. 

Recently the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, took a look at past severe El Niño years, with an ear to what music was popular at the time.

It was a historical perspective so unique, KUT’s Mose Buchele decided to put it on the radio.


A “Big Year” is a tradition in birdwatching when a birder tries to spot as many bird species as they can over the course of a year in a certain place. It’s an intensely personal thing, when a man or woman travels to far-flung locales just to check another bird off their list. But this year, some Travis County birders put a new, more social spin on the tradition.


Aubrey Kelly/Cornell University

Prairie voles are social rodents. They live in colonies underground, and display almost human-like behavior. For example, prairie vole couples are known to mate for life, but new research out of UT Austin is calling into question our understanding of the creature, and of evolution itself.


Mose Buchele/KUT

The Texas Water Development board has $7 million to spend to improve the state’s emergency response to flooding.


Courtesy of the Town Lake Animal Center

Austin’s animal shelters have suffered serious overcrowding and city’s response time to pick up aggressive stray animals, according to a city audit out earlier this year.

The report attributes those problems to Austin’s “no-kill” animal shelter policy that says at least 90 percent of animals brought to shelters cannot be euthanized. Today, the head of Austin’s Animal Services Department will talk to a city council committee about those concerns.


New technology developed here in Austin promises to give advanced warning for floods, but what exactly would that mean for first responders struggling to rescue people? A look at recent flooding in Central Texas shows how a project to provide real-time flood prediction software on a national scale could help.


flickr/smreilly

The low gas prices a lot of us are enjoying when we fill up our cars are thanks, in part, to a glut in the global supply of oil.  In fact there’s so much crude oil being pumped right now that it's created a traffic jam in an unlikely place.


Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Texas Tribune

Natural gas, coal, wind are the resources that usually come to mind when we think about power generation in Texas. But a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey estimates Texas has enough uranium underground to power nuclear plants across the country for five years.

The USGS assessment found a 60-million-ton concentration of unmined uranium oxide embedded in sandstone under the Texas Coastal Plain – a deposit that, if developed, the agency estimates could supply a year’s worth of power to U.S. nuclear reactors.


Staff Sgt. James L. Harper, Jr., USAF, via flickr/chucksimmins

Over seven years after hurricanes Ike and Dolly devastated the Texas coast, $3.1 billion in federal disaster relief remains unspent. It's a number that recently became a point of focus at a state Senate Committee hearing on disaster recovery.


Courtesy: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

In some part of the world, including a site near the Texas-New Mexico border, nuclear waste is kept in rock salt deposits deep underground.  It’s long been thought that these geologic formations were some of the safest places to store humankind’s most toxic waste, but new research suggests those places may not be as safe as we thought.


UT Austin

A team of scientists at UT Austin has brought us closer to understanding how some animals turn almost invisible in certain lights by studying fish deep in the ocean.


UT Austin

Engineers at UT Austin have created a new kind of gel that can repair and reconnect electronic circuits. KUT's Mose Buchele reports on possible applications, from smarter smart phones to self-healing robot armies. 

Mose Buchele/KUT

Austin’s creeks and waterways are part of what’s attracted people to this part of the world for thousands of years.  But, of course, they also create flooding hazards. When one heavy rain on top of another sends tons of debris into the creeks, that flood risk becomes even more difficult to control.

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