Laura Rice

Producer, Texas Standard

Laura first joined the KUT team in April 2012. She now works for the statewide program Texas Standard as a reporter and producer. Laura came to KUT from the world of television news. She has worn many different hats as an anchor, reporter and producer at TV stations in Austin, Amarillo and Toledo, OH. Laura is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia, a triathlete and enjoys travel, film and a good beer. She enjoys spending time with her husband and pets.

Ways to Connect

From Texas Standard:

You've probably been following the string of campus controversies from lower Alabama to Northern California – speaking appearances by alt-right politicos and others who've been branded as purveyors of hate speech. Some have canceled appearances amid concerns by universities that say they can't ensure security and that there won't be violence.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

From Texas Standard:

Over the last several months, opponents of President Donald Trump's plan for the expansion of a border wall with Mexico have listed innumerable reasons why they believe it's a bad idea. And now there’s one new reason. Construction as planned may violate a 47-year-old boundary treaty between the two countries – an issue that could end up in an international court.

Air Force One (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

President Donald Trump's latest executive order focuses on the way the federal government gives visas to highly trained foreign workers. It's part of the administration's "buy American, hire American" efforts, and it could have a pretty significant impact on Texas.

Martin Deutsch/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

New York fashion can often take a while to trickle into the middle of the country. And let's just admit it, some of the styles just never look the same on Main Street as they do on Fifth Avenue. But there is a trend in fashion that's hitting New York that is also reverberating in the heartland: the death of retail.

 

Wells Dunbar/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Texas history is chock full of big names – Sam Houston, Stephen F. Austin and Lorenzo de Zavala to name a few. Joaquín de Arredondo played an important role in the area now known as Texas in the 1800s, but there’s a reason streets and elementary schools aren’t named after him: he was remembered as a ruthless leader with a penchant for violence.

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