Audrey McGlinchy

City Hall Reporter

Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Tonja Walls-Davis has a new favorite grave site: one for a child, where the headstone is in the shape of a single Lego.

“I’ve traveled these grounds so many times,” she said. “But, like I said, every time I come I see something new. Their life a lot of times is represented on their headstones.”


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT News

Could streets be like doctors? A streetlight that diagnoses an ulcerous colon, or sidewalk that administers chemotherapy?

That question is what Austin City Council Member Delia Garza leveled at the oft-optimistic Mayor Steve Adler during the last Council meeting before members broke for the month of July.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A federal district court ruled late Wednesday that two rules governing how candidates for Austin office handle campaign funds violate the First Amendment. The ruling came after Council member Don Zimmerman filed a lawsuit challenging the city’s campaign finance rules last year.

In a release from his lawyer, Zimmerman said, “We are examining our further options regarding the affirmation of our First Amendment rights to political speech.”

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin City Council candidates scouting for new or incumbent leadership filed their first campaign finance reports Friday. Sure, it's still early going, but the fundraising cycle has ramped up in the five Council districts with races on the ballot in November.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

As investigations into the police shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota have begun, some may wonder what that process is like here in Austin. The Austin Police Department is no stranger to similar police shootings – most notably the 2013 police shooting of Larry Jackson and, more recently, the shooting of 17-year-old David Joseph. So, what happens after an officer uses deadly force? 


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

It’s been one week since Baton Rouge police officers shot and killed Alton Sterling, a black man selling CDs outside a convenience store. Just a day later, Philando Castile was shot and killed by police outside St. Paul, Minn.

Then last Thursday, a lone gunman killed five Dallas police officers as protestors were winding down what was, by many accounts, a peaceful rally. The following day, the Austin Police Department ushered 37 new police officers onto the force.


Jenna VonHofe for KUT

Natalie Gauldin’s backyard plays by its own rules. The grass tickles our calves and her almost 3-year-old daughter has left some toys scattered around. Dogs bark at us from inside her house in Austin’s District 7. But all these distractions, we tune out. We’re here to talk about one sentence on her campaign website.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Steps past a motorized gate and calf-deep in dung-spotted grass, Rick Cofer looked upon the acres of land that make up John Trevino Jr. Park. The entire park, Cofer said, is 330 acres. Yards in front of him, a herd of cows sought shade on a Texas summer afternoon.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

According to the City of Austin’s latest annual performance review released June 22, the time it takes Austin police officers to respond to high-priority calls has been steadily increasing over the past five years.

Ilana Panich-Linsman for KUT

In a vote that pit representatives of the city’s lowest-income districts against their colleagues, Austin City Council members narrowly approved an 8 percent homestead exemption on Wednesday – an increase of 2 percent over last year’s exemption. To a resident with a home worth $250,000, that equates to a nearly $23 in annual savings on their property taxes.


Sarah Jasmine Montgomery for KUT

Sharmar Mohamed Hassan doesn’t know the words in English to describe his bicycle. So he uses his native language, Somali, to tell me it’s a green road bike. And it’s his primary form of transportation in Austin — which, at times, can be a little touch-and-go.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Cars, buses and trucks idle at the four-way intersection at Guadalupe Street and West Dean Keeton Street. A horde of prospective students takes to the crosswalk, the timer counting down. 


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

April Marshall stood among the remains of her mother’s home last month in southeast Travis County, pointing out the new, donated couch still wrapped plastic. The family was still in the process of furnishing their home wrecked by flooding in October, when roughly three feet of floodwaters rushed their home again in May.


Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

It looks like either way you slice it, there will be a mobility bond up for a public vote in November. The real question is, what will Austin voters be deciding on? 

Mayor Steve Adler has drafted one proposal, while Council Members Greg Casar and Leslie Pool have written another. And then there's Council member Ann Kitchen's proposal.  

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

He’s cleared out one joint six times in just the past few months. In one video captured by a homeowner, he wore gloves. And he often doesn’t bother to close doors behind him. 

According to at least four Austin residents, one man has not been playing by the rules of neighborhood Little Free Libraries. The man is said to have been emptying the book trade depositories throughout the city. The libraries, which often look like roomy birdhouses, are posted like mailboxes on front lawns. The idea is to encourage book sharing among neighbors. Passersby are encouraged to “take a book, return a book.”

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

In a dark room usually reserved for musical performances in South Austin’s Strange Brew coffee shop, four Austin residents met on Monday to talk about the process of citizen petitions — the most recent of which resulted in Proposition 1 — and the debate over local regulations for ride-hailing companies.


Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

At Black Star Co-op in North Austin, workers take food and drink orders, doling out burgers and beers on a recent weekday. Ask who owns the place, and the response might confound you: the members, or a select number of customers.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

After delaying a vote for several meetings, Public Safety Commissioners Monday supported a resolution asking for more racial profiling data from the Austin Police Department and a more rigorous analysis of it by the Office of the Police Monitor.

Commissioner Mike Levy took a minute to congratulate fellow commissioners after a unanimous vote.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

At a city-run job fair back in March, 15-year-old Jake Santema awaited an interview with city staff as part of the process to become a summer lifeguard signed up to be a lifeguard.

“I’m a little nervous of the feeling of having someone’s life on my hands,” said Santema. “It sounds nerve-wracking a little bit.”


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT News

Residents in southeast Travis County are cleaning up homes destroyed in last week’s flooding.

Monday, in what would have been Andy Creed’s living room, volunteers were sweeping, unscrewing and pulling out the walls and insulation of his girlfriend’s mother’s house. Creed said that at around 10 p.m. Thursday, during heavy rains, the water started rising. 


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