Audrey McGlinchy

City Hall Reporter

Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members learned last week that the completion of the new downtown public library has been hit with delays, again.

“I do think that it is getting very close, but I don’t have a specific date that I can give you quite yet,” Toni Lambert, acting director of libraries, told council members at a budget meeting.

Property ownership can be a stealth business, with land changing hands before anyone even has time to notice.

For the past four years, one North Texas company has quietly bought up property on East 12th Street. Ironically, the company takes its name from a cry of surprise and discovery: Eureka!

Austin History Center

On a vacant lot at the corner of East 12th and Salina streets, Ada Harden sees a silver screen where a fence now stands.

“Can you imagine a theater sitting right here?” she asks, giggling. She certainly can.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

A new report suggests Travis County refused more federal requests to detain undocumented immigrants than any other law enforcement agency. The report from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency is the first of what are promised to be weekly publications. 


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Members of the public testified for the first time Tuesday on three bills that would create statewide regulations for ride-hailing companies in Texas. The bills could also pave a way for Uber and Lyft to return to Austin.

Jorge Sanhueza Lyon / KUT

Mel Roe was eating dinner Saturday night at Manuel’s Mexican Restaurant in downtown Austin when she nearly threw her phone at the wall. She said the app of one of Austin’s six fledgling ride-hailing companies, Fasten, would not let her request a ride.

So, she relied on a technique used by many who’ve been stranded before her.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

The Austin Police Department will begin implementing a new policy concerning how it identifies transgender and gender-nonconforming crime victims.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Traversing Austin on foot often brings to mind Shel Silverstein’s famed collection of poems, “Where the Sidewalk Ends.” In Austin, the sidewalk often ends – or doesn’t begin at all.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members are hoping to make good on promises to create a more affordable Austin. Or, at the very least, ratify a plan to.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

At the rear of the Terrazas Branch of the Austin Public Library on E. Cesar Chavez Street, roughly 10 people gather in a meeting room. It looks like any classroom. There’s a white board at the back, unflattering lighting above, and rows of chairs stacked to the side.

The future of a residential facility for adults with autism is in limbo after a vote by a city of Austin commission.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Reedy Spigner, 45, straddles a gray carpet strewn with empty glass bottles and pieces of tape – just some of the things left behind in a move. In front of him is an entire wall of windows. From there, he looks out onto East 22nd Street and is transported some 35 years into the past.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Danny Fowler stands in the middle of his driveway holding a vase full of red flowers.

He is taking them to his neighbor, who lives just across the street, over the crest of the steep hill that cuts this East Austin cul-de-sac in two. The street, which begins as E.M. Franklin Avenue before morphing into Grant Street, makes up Ebony Acres, a historically black neighborhood.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Stand atop the hill at the northeast corner of the Texas State Cemetery, and you’ll have a clear view of the Texas State Capitol. It rises alongside a row of trees, now leafless, and a Texas flag. That view, some City Council members say, demands protection.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Travis County raised nearly $90,000 as of Monday afternoon through an online initiative set up after Gov. Greg Abbott cut $1.5 million in grant funding over the sheriff’s new immigration policy. State Rep. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) launched the fundraising site Friday in partnership with the Austin Community Foundation.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Texas lawmakers heard hours of public testimony Thursday and into early Friday morning over a bill banning so-called “sanctuary cities” in Texas, ultimately voting early this morning 7-2 along party lines to send the bill to the full Senate.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The Travis County sheriff’s new immigration policy goes into effect today. The policy limits what information local law enforcement share with the federal immigration agency, and it's already stirred up a lot of controversy.

This morning, Gov. Greg Abbott came through on a pledge to cancel $1.5 million in criminal justice grants from his office to Travis County over the policy.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In his letter to faculty and students Sunday, University of Texas at Austin President Greg Fenves addressed President Donald Trump’s recent executive order temporarily closing the county to immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Attend the Mayor Steve Adler's annual State of the City address with a group of 20- and 30-somethings and you’re likely to catch at least one reference to NBC’s comedy “Parks and Recreation.” In the show, comedian Amy Poehler plays the excitable head of a small city’s parks and recreation department. As Amy Stansbury, 26, knows, the image the show paints of local government is less than flattering.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

In his annual State of the City Address Saturday night, Austin Mayor Steve Adler appeared to denounce the White House’s ban on Syrian refugees and immigrants from some Muslim-majority countries.

“I just want the immigrant and refugee community in this city to know that we are a welcoming and supportive community and that they are an important part of our community and in this community they should feel welcome and safe,” said Adler.

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