Andrew Weber

Web Producer

Andrew Weber is a web producer for KUT News. A graduate of St. Edward's University with a degree in English, Andrew has previously interned with The Texas Tribune, The Austin American-Statesman and KOOP Radio.

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Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

"Our community is violating no federal laws," Austin Mayor Steve Adler said in response to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' remarks today that the Justice Department would go after "sanctuary" jurisdictions that don't cooperate with immigration authorities.

During surprise remarks at the White House, Sessions urged these jurisdictions to reconsider their policies.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The Texas Senate has given preliminary approval to a bill that would penalize jurisdictions with so-called “sanctuary” immigration policies. The 20-11 vote fell along party lines.

Screenshot via @DanHanzus/Twitter

Turns out, Tom Brady can’t have everything.

The New England Patriots’ quarterback cemented his place in NFL history last night – becoming the first quarterback to win five Super Bowls and bringing the Pats back from a historic deficit to defeat the Falcons in the first overtime Super Bowl ever.

But, while Brady was celebrating the team’s win, his jersey was stolen at NRG Stadium in Houston. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Texas lawmakers heard hours of public testimony Thursday and into early Friday morning over a bill banning so-called “sanctuary cities” in Texas, ultimately voting early this morning 7-2 along party lines to send the bill to the full Senate.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The Travis County sheriff’s new immigration policy goes into effect today. The policy limits what information local law enforcement share with the federal immigration agency, and it's already stirred up a lot of controversy.

This morning, Gov. Greg Abbott came through on a pledge to cancel $1.5 million in criminal justice grants from his office to Travis County over the policy.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Thousands are protesting President Donald Trump’s executive order banning refugees from seven predominately Muslim countries. While federal judges have temporarily stayed parts of that order across the country, notably a provision that would deport some refugees detained at airports, demonstrators have staged protests at airports across the country, including at Austin Bergstrom International Airport.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Update (Jan. 23) – Gov. Greg Abbott sent a letter to Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez today, outlining potential penalties for the county and calling Hernandez’s policy “shortsighted.”

Tens of Thousands Take Part in Women's March on Austin

Jan 21, 2017
Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Thousands of people turned out in Austin today to march in solidarity with the Women's March on Washington. Austin's march was one of more than 600 marches around the world organized to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump and rally around a variety of issues, including reproductive rights, civil rights, immigration and the environment. 

Austinites React to Trump's Inauguration

Jan 20, 2017
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Donald Trump officially became the 45th president of the United States on Friday. Given the reaction to Trump’s election in Austin, there’s sure to be plenty of reaction to his ascendance to the presidency.

Photo Illustration by Andrew Weber, Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin’s got a checkered past when it comes to digital road signs. The blinking roadway signs have been hacked a few times in the past to warn of zombies, to taunt the OU Sooners and to even pay tribute to the meme-launching death of Harambe. But the City of Austin Transportation Department has decided to harness that creative energy for good, by allowing anyone to submit safe-for-work language for road signs starting today.

YouTube

Last October, Austin made history under a shroud of secrecy, it seems.

Today, Google’s parent company Alphabet announced its intention to bring driverless cars to the open market in a new endeavor called Waymo – a project that, according to the company, had its first successful, truly driverless test on Austin’s roads. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Today is runoff election day in the Austin area. You'll be forgiven if you didn't even know there was a runoff election.

Only about 3 percent of registered voters cast a ballot during the early voting period. If you vote today, you'll likely just see two races on the ballot – both for places on the Austin Community College board of trustees. But for those who live in northwest Austin, there’s a third race – this one for city council.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

A new app’s looking to improve rides for Austin cyclists by using crowdsourced input on roads. Ride Report tracks a user’s bike route and surveys them on road and safety conditions after their ride’s concluded.

The app allows Austinites to plan trips throughout the city, providing suggestions on the best possible routes and conditions based on aggregate user data. After each ride, you can rate your commute “great” or “not great,” and those ratings feed the app’s so-called “stress map,” which color codes the best and worst roads and trails in the city according to the data. 

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Austin voters in five of the city’s 10 districts have decided who will represent them on the city council. This includes districts 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10 – Southeast and most of North Austin. Austinites will also the fate of the $720 million transportation bond. 

10:44 p.m. – In District 7, Council Member Leslie Pool holds a 73 percent lead over challenger Natalie Gauldin, who's garnered 27 percent of the vote with 48 percent of Election Day votes counted.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Members of the public have weighed in on Mayor Steve Adler’s $720 million transportation bond proposal, and council members have taken the first two of three votes needed to officially put the bond on a November ballot.

If voters approve the bond measure, it would mean an increase in property taxes of about $5 a month for the average homeowner in Austin.

So, what would the bond buy, exactly?


Starting in 1869, the timeline below chronicles past floods that hit the Austin area.

Austin History Center

Today's Wayback Wednesday looks back at Austin's onetime Victorian-era literary magazine, The Rolling Stone. The DIY-minded rag published short stories, cartoons and other Onion-esque items, but it is largely known as the first creative sandbox for its publisher, William Sydney Porter.

Porter, a North Carolina transplant who moved to Austin in the late 1880s, worked as a druggist and as a clerk at the General Land Office before he took a job at the First National Bank as a teller. It was during his time as a teller that he started The Rolling Stone in 1894. 

Courtesy of Jesse Sublett

Today’s podcast edition of Wayback Wednesday starts, like many Texas stories, with football. It also ends with football, but in the middle it’s got most of the things those other football stories don’t have: an amazing crime spree, with burglaries, bare-knuckle brawling, prostitution, federal investigations and a couple of murders. And it all starts with a kid from East Austin named Timmy Overton.

Texas History Center

In honor of Texas Independence Day, this week we’re looking back at the mystery of the Texas Constitution. 

The mystery being that, after 180 years, it doesn't technically have one in effect, because the State of Texas has never formally recognized one of the many versions of its constitution.


Steve Hopson, via WikiMedia Creative Commons

Thirty-five years ago Thursday, the Armadillo World Headquarters was on its last leg.

After a decade on the scene, Eddie Wilson's legendary club had one last blowout to bookend its time at the forefront of Austin's live music scene, culminating in a New Year's Eve party on December 31, 1980.

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