Andrew Weber

Web Producer

Andrew Weber is a web producer for KUT News. A graduate of St. Edward's University with a degree in English, Andrew has previously interned with The Texas Tribune, The Austin American-Statesman and KOOP Radio.

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Wayback Wednesday
3:27 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Austin's History of Floods

Starting in 1869, the timeline below chronicles past floods that hit the Austin area.

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Wayback Wednesday
1:37 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

The Paving of Congress Avenue and the Last of the Austin Streetcars

Congress Avenue in the 1880s, when mule-drawn streetcars were the only form of public transportation in Austin.
Austin History Center, PICA 02530

In 1905, 110 years ago this week, the City of Austin began paving the city’s main street: Congress Avenue. The paving was meted out in segments – the stretch of Sixth Street to what’s now Cesar Chavez getting the rollout first.

While the pavement signaled a new era in Austin, it also meant the beginning of the end for Austin’s streetcar system, Austin Electric Railway – the latest corporate iteration in a revolving door of companies with Congress Avenue right-of-way – which had been operating at a loss since 1891 and, at the city’s insistence, had to pay for and implement a good portion of the buildout.

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Twin Peaks Shooting
12:41 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

The Outlaw Biker Gangs Behind Sunday's Deadly Shootings in Waco

The Bandidos biker gang was at the center of Sunday's shooting at a Twin Peaks.
KUT

Authorities in Waco are still on alert after Sunday's shootout at a Twin Peaks restaurant, which involved five biker gangs and ultimately left nine dead and 18 injured. The gun battle centered around two Texas motorcycle clubs: the Bandidos and the Cossacks, an upstart gang that crashed a Bandidos meetup at the restaurant.

While the news stunned many in Texas and garnered national attention, the news was especially shocking to Texas Monthly's Skip Hollandsworth, who wrote about the Bandidos for the magazine in 2007.

Hollandsworth spoke with KUT's Nathan Bernier about his experiences with the Bandidos, the fierce loyalty and business savvy of its members and the impact Sunday's shooting will have on the group in the future.

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Austin
12:41 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

A Look Back at B.B. King's Legacy in Austin's Blues Scene

B.B. King and Clifford Antone with Lucille, King's famous Gibson guitar.
YouTube

Last night marked the end of an era in music with the passing of B.B. King. The quintessential bluesman and last of the blues’ “Three Kings” died at the age of 89 last night. From his earliest days. King was perennially on the road. Some of his earliest shows were in East Austin at the Victory Grill, back when the city was still segregated, and he continued to be a fixture in the Austin music scene throughout his prolific career.

Take a look back at Austin’s history with the King below.

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Wayback Wednesday
1:46 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

The Union-Bustin' Origins of the Texas State Capitol

A look at the construction site of what would become the Texas State Capitol.
Austin History Center, via Portal to Texas History

This week marks the 127th anniversary of the Texas State Capitol’s dedication. Well, not necessarily. May 14 marked the completion of the Capitol, along with a week-long celebration to dedicate it, but the state didn’t accept Pomeranian builder Gustav Wilke’s granite-domed monument to Texas because of structural issues — chiefly, the copper roof leaked.

The building was officially dedicated seven months later, but Wilke’s architectural prowess wasn’t blamed for the building’s initial shoddiness — he would later go on to build some of the world’s first skyscrapers. Ultimately, the capitol building’s inconsistencies, exacerbated by a Chicago-based syndicate bankrolling Wilke’s operation, a years-long labor strike and a handful Texas convicts and Scottish strike-busters, contributed to the project’s hamstringing.

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Wayback Wednesday
2:50 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

A Look Back at the Dicey Days of Beef, Before Brisket Was King

Brisket's hot now, but it wasn't always the hip, award-winning cut of beef it is today.
KUT News

Pitmasters across Texas may have mixed feelings about Aaron Franklin winning the James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Southwest this week, but it does mark the first time the prestigious culinary award’s honored a barbecue pitmaster.

But brisket, for which Franklin is well known, was not always so revered. This Wayback Wednesday looks back on the days before beef became haute cuisine, when you used the whole cow because you had to, not because you wanted to — back when beef was used for everything from "beef tea" to bread pudding.

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Wayback Wednesday
1:51 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

William Sydney Porter and Austin's Original 'Rolling Stone'

The cover of The Rolling Stone's final issue from April 25, 1895.
Austin History Center

Today's Wayback Wednesday looks back at Austin's onetime Victorian-era literary magazine, The Rolling Stone. The DIY-minded rag published short stories, cartoons and other Onion-esque items, but it is largely known as the first creative sandbox for its publisher, William Sydney Porter.

Porter, a North Carolina transplant who moved to Austin in the late 1880s, worked as a druggist and as a clerk at the General Land Office before he took a job at the First National Bank as a teller. It was during his time as a teller that he started The Rolling Stone in 1895. A year later, in April of 1896, Porter printed the last issue after being fired from the bank for embezzling money. Turns out he was using the money to support his enterprise, a crime that would land him time in federal prison, where he would continue writing under his now-famous pseudonym: O. Henry.

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Austin
3:09 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Why Some Downtown Austin Buildings Sit Vacant for Years

920 Congress is one of four buildings on Congress Avenue that's had little activity over several years.
Miguel Gutierrez, Jr./KUT

For the past 10 years, the Austin skyline’s been in a state of constant flux. In the past year alone, two towers have gone up in the downtown area: the Colorado Tower and the IBC Bank Plaza. Those two buildings, which combine for nearly 570,000 square feet in office and retail space, were all but leased by the time they opened their doors.

But, for some buildings, the wait is a little longer.

For some buildings – like the former headquarters of La Bare on Riverside Drive, the boxy little historic building at Congress and Riverside just down the road, and even some properties in the heart of Downtown Austin, just a few blocks from the Capitol – the wait is seemingly interminable, leaving daily passersby wondering why such high-value real estate lies vacant in the middle of a Austin’s development boom.

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Wayback Wednesday
2:55 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Why Texas' First Attempt at a Statewide Police Force Was a Crooked, Bloody Mess

A Texas State Police badge that sold for $4,000 last month in New Braunfels.
Credit Burley Auction Group

Today marks the 142nd anniversary of the state’s repeal of the Texas State Police. Like all states, Texas has a statewide law enforcement agency in the Texas Department of Public Safety’s state troopers, but the first iteration of the concept, which lasted only three years, was as unabashedly radical as it was a bloodstained, crooked and altogether haphazardly assembled endeavor.

The group of white, black and Hispanic men who fought on both sides of the Civil War – some were criminals, others were law enforcement who went on to serve in the Texas Rangers – were an incredibly effective force.

In their first month, the police made 978 arrests, according to the governor, of which 239 were for murder or attempted murder – the year prior, the state handily led the nation in deaths. They also enforced Reconstruction-era policies designed to protect African-Americans that were largely derided statewide, like guarding polling locations. However, they were also accused of murdering suspects, were essentially an illegal military extension of the state’s top office and were led by a corrupt, embezzling Adjutant General.

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Wayback Wednesday
12:06 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

A Look at Austin City Limits Through the Years

Credit ACL via YouTube

Today’s Wayback Wednesday looks back at some memorable performances of the 41-year-old music program. One of ACL's creators, Bill Arhos, passed away last Saturday at the age of 80. So as a tribute of sorts, we’ve compiled videos from the show’s four-decade run, with a song from the show’s inaugural broadcast in 1974 with Willie Nelson, a 1982 set from Emmylou Harris, a cut from what would be Stevie Ray Vaughan’s final performance at Studio 6A, and a recent tune from Rodrigo y Gabriela.

Check out the full video playlist below.

Austin
3:17 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Austin Has No Craigslist 'Safe Zone,' So We Tried the Police Station

Police departments have opened their doors to sellers in online transactions on sites like Craigslist.
KUT News

Craigslist and other online forums are all about connections. Some are hilariously missed. But other times those connections go horribly awry, and one party is left with less than they bargained for — or worse.

So to combat scams, robberies and assaults resulting from online transactions, Craigslist suggests that people make “high-value” exchanges at local police stations. And police departments across the country have started opening up their doors to buyers and sellers and creating so-called Craigslist safe zones.

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Wayback Wednesday
1:50 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

A Look Back at Texas' Unfunniest April Fools' Jokes

The Texas House recognized Albert DeSalvo's work in "applied psychology" and "population control" in 1971.
Credit Wikipedia

It’s April Fools' Day, the holiday that not only celebrates but encourages folks to play jokes and pranks on their loved ones and coworkers.

Sometimes, those jokes and pranks don’t turn out so well. So in honor of April Fools' Day, this Wayback Wednesday looks back on the jokes and pranks in Texas’ history that, even if they landed at the time, would likely fall flat today.

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Education
11:19 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Map: The Cost of Private Schools Under Two Different Voucher Bills

Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

This week, the Texas Senate Education committee started to tackle multiple bills that would create school voucher programs. The proposals are strongly supported by conservative lawmakers, especially Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick.

One bill filed by Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels) would create a grant giving parents 60 percent of the annual cost for maintenance and operations per student, or about $5,200, through the proposed Taxpayer Savings Grant. Another bill would give 75 percent of that annual per-student funding to parents, or just over $6,500 though the so-called Education Tuition Grant.

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Austin
10:30 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Map: In Austin, Noise Complaints are on the Rise

Austinite Kingston Arbor, 3 months old, hangs with his father Ryan Arbor at an Austin music festival in 2013.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Despite the best efforts by Austinites to dissuade out-of-towners from moving here, they are. The city’s grown more than any other metropolitan area over the last five years, and with all that growth comes plenty of noise. That's not to mention the additional noise brought about by events like SXSW, which draw thousands of party-happy visitors from all over the world.

So it's not surprising that as Austin grows larger, it might also be growing louder. Over the past five years, noise complaints in Austin have gone up by 470 percent, from 2,782 total complaints in 2010 to 13,100 in 2014. Still, only 1.5 percent of those have faced citation – 515 out of 33,107, according to city data obtained by KUT. Below you can view the increase in noise complaints from 2010 to 2014 in an interactive map.

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Wayback Wednesday
2:03 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

In Photos: A Look Back at the Early Days of SXSW

Roland Swenson at the second installment of SXSW.
Austin History Center

Today marks the beginning of SXSW Music — the final stretch of the three-headed chimera of a festival that draws in droves of music-loving revelers and fills the streets of downtown Austin with both music and traffic.

Education
4:23 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Map: If the Voucher Bill Passes, How Much Would Travis County Private Schools Cost?

Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), who filed the school vouchers bill in the 2015 legislative session. The bill would allow students and their families to use state dollars to attend private schools.
Ryan Loyd/TPR

For the 61 percent of economically disadvantaged students who attend Austin Public Schools, private school tuition might seem impossible for their families to afford. Sometimes public school is the only option for parents or guardians, and they are forced to keep their children in schools that are struggling academically.

Some Republican state lawmakers say that shouldn’t be the case.

“Not just the wealthy who can send their children to private school, and not just those who have the mobility to move to the suburbs," Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick said at the beginning of the 2015 legislative session.  "But for parents in the inner cities where their children are trapped in failing schools, it is their right to have those same opportunities.”

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Wayback Wednesday
2:36 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

The Portrait LBJ Never Wanted the World to See

A screenshot from a 1967 news story on the presidential portrait that LBJ rejected.
US National Archives and Records Administration

For today’s Wayback Wednesday, we look back at a portrait by famed landscape artist Peter Hurd that Lyndon B. Johnson wished nobody would’ve ever seen:

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Technology
10:43 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Hacker Group Anonymous Calls for Boycott of Austin-Based Blog

Hacker group Anonymous recently launched a campaign against Austin-based website the Daily Dot. The hacktivist collective released a video Monday night encouraging netizens and advertisers to boycott the site on social media after it was revealed the site had published articles written by Hector “Sabu” Monsegur, a former Anonymous hacker turned FBI informant.

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Wayback Wednesday
1:15 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Looking Back: When The Drag Wasn't Such a Drag

This photo, taken some time in the early 1950s, shows Guadalupe looking south. To the right is the Varsity Theater.
PICA 26827, Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

Today's Wayback Wednesday takes a look back at Guadalupe Street, before it was awash in the glow of stop lights and rush hour brake lights.

SXSW 2015
1:48 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Here's a Look at Some of the Brand-Backed Buildouts Planned for SXSW

Ketel One will be building a windmill over South By similar to this one built at the Art Basel Festival in 2013.
YouTube

Many predict this year’s South By Southwest will be pared down compared to years past. While the days of giant Doritos vending machines are gone, there are still a couple of corporate-backed buildouts and events to lure in fest-goers.

So, we decided to rummage through city permits to preview some of the stranger requests from South By sponsors.

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