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KUT Weekend brings you our favorite stories from the KUT newsroom. Updated Fridays!

Shelby Knowles/Texas Tribune

The Texas Forensic Science Commission on Friday recommended that prosecutors temporarily stop using bite-mark evidence in criminal cases until questions are answered about its scientific validity.

A panel of the commission has been investigating the reliability of bite-mark evidence following several exonerations across the country in criminal cases where convictions were won partly with bite-mark analysis. One primary concern is "the ability of human skin to record bite marks with sufficient fidelity" to be of use for future analysis, commission general counsel Lynn Garcia reported to the group.

This week on The Ticket 2016: The Texas Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott get you ready for the South Carolina primary by explaining who's voting, who's still running and what could happen on Primary night for both parties. And we'll get an update on what's happening in Texas as we get closer to Super Tuesday – with Democratic strategist Colin Strother.


au.smallbusiness.yahoo.com

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of getting back as much as we give.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

From The Austin Monitor: With their eyes on a possible transportation bond election in November, City Council members on Thursday kicked off a process for determining which items the public will be asked to weigh in on this fall.

Image via Flickr/Nan Palmero (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

According to Forbes, Texas has four of America's next boom towns: Austin, San Antonio, Houston and Dallas. Thanks to technology hubs like Austin and "opportunity cities" like San Antonio, Texas is pretty much the blueprint for America's cities of the future.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

Given that it’s in a government building, the painting that hangs outside Mayor Steve Adler’s office is a bizarre choice. It’s a portrait of a cat – its head crowned in what looks like a steel headdress, with an ornate keyhole at its center. Behind the cat’s head, canoes full of sushi float atop a body of water. Chopsticks stand in for paddles. If nothing else is clear – and little is – the cat wields enormous power over these pieces of sushi. The canoes carrying them appear to be rowing toward it in an act of obedience.


Marjorie Kamys Cotera for the Texas Tribune

The list of investigations into Attorney General Ken Paxton’s conduct just got a little bit longer. The Texas State Bar was ordered last week to launch a disciplinary probe into Paxton’s conduct in the days following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage — an investigation that could end with Paxton getting disbarred.

Screenshot via YouTube

The Austin City Council is poised to decide the future of ride-hailers Uber and Lyft Thursday in a vote that would either adopt a council-penned initiative or put the issue to referendum.

But the council has had this fight before – 100 years ago.

Mike Blizzard via Twitter

When you Google image search Rachel Kania and Tori Moreland, you'll find each of them in similarly staged photos, each wearing a collared shirt and pearls, each standing in front of what looks to be a tall wooden fence – as if they're keeping someone out, but in a friendly way, like a genial neighbor would.

Image credit Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

The morning after the New Hampshire primary, let's consider that no so-called presidential frontrunner – in this case, Hillary Clinton – has ever lost an early primary by 20 percentage points. That may mean nothing. Or, it may mean that Bernie Sanders' talk about a political revolution is more than empty stump speech puffery.

The key to the conventions is the South, and candidates know it.

  

Callie Richmond for the Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling Tuesday to block President Obama’s Clean Power Plan has helped state Republicans — at least temporarily — dodge major action on climate change.

Jeff Heimsath for KUT News

*This post has been updated throughout.

University of Texas System Chancellor Bill McRaven says he supports increased tuition at eight of the system's universities, including UT Austin. At a Board of Regents meeting Wednesday, McRaven said tuition at UT schools is below the national average, but so are faculty salaries. Plus, he says many lower-income students attend UT schools on scholarships and grants. 

Ilana Panich-Linsman for KUT

Texas will start casting votes in this year’s presidential race starting Feb. 16.

For Texas Republicans, this could be yet another year the Latino vote slips through their fingers, as the rhetoric during this year’s primary could make  mobilizing Hispanic voters even harder this year.


On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Alex Haley.

This month, Austin will host the second annual OUTsider Festival. The fest, which will last five days, aims to celebrate the diverse nature of the LBGTQI creative community.

Nathan Bernier for KUT News

The identities of the police officer and the subject involved in Monday’s deadly officer-involved shooting were released Tuesday afternoon. The officer was more-than-ten-year department veteran Geoffrey Freeman. The subject who was fatally shot in the incident was identified as 17-year-old David Joseph.

Joseph was unarmed at the time of the incident, said Austin Police Chief of Staff Officer Brian Manley. When asked why it took more than a day to determine and report whether the subject had been armed, Manley responded:

Photo via Flickr/stephenvelasco (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

On Tuesday, New Hampshire voters will exercise their right to shape both Republican and Democratic presidential nominees’ futures. They’ll be voting in the country's second nominating process – the primaries.

Some experts believe Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders have the greatest chances for victory in New Hampshire and that wins there could give them a lot of momentum in their push for the Presidency.

 


KUT News

Warnings that strict voter ID laws could hinder turnout among minority voters were right, according to a new study from the University of California-San Diego. It is the first research looking at a slew of voter ID laws across the country, including Texas'.


The Austin Monitor

From the Austin Monitor: The cost of a large expansion of U.S. Highway 183 in Northwest Austin officially nearly tripled on Monday night.

At its monthly meeting, the Transportation Policy Board of the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization voted to amend its long-range plan to increase the price of the 183 North Mobility Project from $225.7 million to $650 million.

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