News

Patrick Dentler/KUT

The number 110 gets thrown around a lot in the context of Austin's fast-paced growth – that’s the estimated number of people that move to Austin on a daily basis.

Sure, when you’re on the road it may feel like every one of those neophyte Austinites is right there on the road with you. But, while 110 people a day is impressive, so is the number of people leaving the city.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:   

After a guest editorial was published in the Houston Chronicle warned of a potential meltdown in the state's healthcare safety net, Governor Greg Abbott sent an email from his personal account to a top adviser asking to "see the financials" of author Kenneth Janda's company, Community Health Choice, a non-profit health insurer.


Flickr/thomashawk (CC BY-NC 2.0)

We’ve been hearing a lot lately from politicians and public figures about crimes committed by immigrants to the U.S., but a new study by a group of researchers, including a University of Texas at Austin professor, suggests foreign-born teens are actually much less likely to commit crimes than those born in the U.S.

Ben Philpott/KUT News

This week on The Ticket: The Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott talk about one of the only GOP candidates that's been able to survive the Summer of Trump: Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

While Cruz's poll numbers have held steady, he's set himself up as an alternative to Trump, if, or when, the current GOP frontrunner flames out.


Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard

There was an execution-style murder of a Houston deputy last week. Two days later, an off-duty officer in Abilene was found dead at his home. It was ruled a homicide.


Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

People struggling with alcoholism can trace their addiction to a population of neurons in the brain that, when stimulated, influence whether one drink leads to two.


Heather Kennedy/Flickr

There are lots of things we power with batteries these days, from interactive children's books that use tiny batteries, to toothbrushes that run on bigger batteries, to our mobile devices with their rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

But when a battery's life ends, we're faced with the question of what to do with it. Right now, Austinites can drop off their used batteries at any of the city's library branches to be recycled. But what happens to those batteries after they're dropped off? 


On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Robert C. Maynard, journalist, newspaper publisher, editor and former owner of the Oakland Tribune newspaper.

Maynard was a charismatic leader who changed the face of American journalism, built a four-decade career on the cornerstones of editorial integrity, community involvement, improved education and the importance of the family.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Texas Tribune

A contempt hearing set for next week against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has been canceled.

Federal court Judge Orlando Garcia canceled the hearing, writing that Paxton and the other state officials— Governor Greg Abbott and interim Commissioner of the Texas State Department of Health and Human Services Kirk Cole — have complied with the court's Aug. 5 order to amend the death certificate of one member of a married same-sex couple and to issue state policy guidelines for recognizing legal same-sex marriages on birth and death certificates.

Texas Portal to History

Believe it or not, this month is Passport Awareness Month – the two-fortnight campaign in which the State Department encourages citizens to renew or apply for their passports. At worst, it’ll take six weeks to get a passport; at best, three weeks.

Eddie Seal/Texas Tribune

An inquiry by the agency that regulates the oil and gas industry in Texas has found that oil and gas activity did not likely cause a swarm of earthquakes around the north Texas towns of Azle and Reno starting in 2013. The finding, however, flies in the face of a peer-reviewed scientific study of the quakes.


Joey Palacios/TPR

The FBI is now monitoring an investigation of a fatal, videotaped shooting involving two Bexar County sheriff's deputies. Some neighbors of the man who died in the San Antonio subdivision of Walnut Pass are on edge.

The Warriors: A Love Story, from ARCOS Dance, isn't an easy show to sum up, even for its creators. It's a multimedia piece, using all the arrows in the ARCOS quiver: film, interactive video projections, live and recorded music, dance, theatrical elements, text, and narration. They've worked to make all those elements work together, though, "in a way that doesn't feel like there are multiple media; we try to make it feel like as immersive an experience as possible for the audience," says co-director Eliot Gray Fisher. "You can't just call it theater or dance...we've been struggling with what to call it. We're calling it 'multimedia performance' because that's kind of broad."

Image via facebook/7chinesebrothers

In the U.S. entertainment industry, there’s LA, there’s New York, and then there’s Texas — at least that’s what a lot of us have gotten used to hearing. But how far away is Texas from actually being that “third coast” in the biz? And what do new reductions in film incentives to do that image?

Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

Today, Sept. 1, marks the legal start for more than 600 new state laws for Texans to follow. From healthcare to transportation to education and public safety, there’s something that affects everyone in the Lone Star State.


From Austin Parks Foundation, this month's Get Involved spotlight organization:

Austin Parks Foundation is devoted to connecting people to parks. Since its establishment in 1992, Austin Parks Foundation has focused on developing partnerships that foster on development and maintenance of Austin’s treasured parks, trails and public green spaces. Austin Parks Foundation focuses on volunteerism, park activation, community resources, sustainability projects, and public-private partnerships.

Todd Wiseman, Damian Gadal, Robert Couse-Baker/Texas Tribune

The system Texas uses to pay for public schools was back in court today, and lawyers on both sides argued over whether the system is constitutional. It's an argument that's been going on for more than thirty years.

This particular case started in 2011, when the state legislature cut more than $5 billion from public education. Two-thirds of Texas school districts sued the state, arguing the cuts made it impossible to meet state academic standards. They won in a lower court. But today, the case was argued in the state Supreme Court.


What Happens If Barton Creek Mall Closes?

Sep 1, 2015
Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

In some U.S. cities, shopping malls are a thing of the past. For the malls that are surviving, about one-fifth have vacancy rates that experts consider "troubling.”

Austin's own Highland Mall went that way: It recently closed and was converted into a community college campus. But what about the city's other big indoor mall?


Image via flickr/Cayusa (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Since the televised murder of two reporters last week in Virginia, a 17-year-old was killed in a shooting near an elementary school in southwest Houston, a police officer was shot and killed in Sunset, Louisiana, when he tried to intervene in a violent domestic dispute, and an on-campus shooting at Texas Southern University injured one person.

Kathryn Decker/flickr

Have you ever applied for a job where they ask you to check a box if you have a criminal record?

Over the summer, Austin's District 4 City Council member Greg Casar put together a group to look for ways Austin businesses could change that practice, or, “ban the box.”


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