Two Guys on Your Head

Each week on Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, explore different aspects of human behavior and the brain.

In conversations hosted by producer Rebecca McInroy, the two renowned psychologists cover everything from the effects of sugar on the brain, to what's happening in our minds while we sleep, and much, much more.

Listen to the Two Guys every Friday at 7:51 a.m., 1:49 and 4:51 p.m. on KUT-FM. You can always dig into the posts below or checkout and subscribe to podcasts via iTunes

We'd love to know what you're curious about!  Email us your topics and suggestions at twoguys@kut.org. And follow Two Guys on Twitter: @2GoYH

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For many of us, the holidays mean spending time with our families, carrying out traditions that we’ve practiced for years.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about while it can be very stressful, it can also be a beautiful time of re-centering, and give us an opportunity to become psychologically close to the person that we used to be in childhood.


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In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of punishment.

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In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology behind both sides of America's ongoing debate about firearms and gun control.


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In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of xenophobia.

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In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about how to exit conversations, and keep group discussions from being co-opted.


In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about understanding the difference between Behaviorism and Gestalt Psychology by looking at theories of language development.


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Have you ever wondered how our brains make sense of objects? How we know a book is a book and a glass of milk is a glass of milk, as opposed to the particles that make up those things?

Scientists have wondered a lot about this, especially a group of German psychologists from the Berlin School of Experimental Psychology. They we're interested in how we understand and make meaningful perceptions out of a very chaotic world. Out of their work we get gestalt principles. 

 


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Have you ever worked with a group of people on a project and really felt like you carried the lion's share of the weight? And then you think back on it and realize you always do more, you always have the great idea, and you never get the recognition you rightfully deserve?

It might be that you are both the problem and the solution.


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At the end of the day the brain wants what it wants, but you might not know that the brain also wants things associated with what it wants, it notices more things that can get it what it wants, and it doesn't really like things that are not aligned with its goals.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of desire.

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The woman's portrait had hung in his parents bedroom was over 100 years old, but as Alex stared at it that morning he swore he saw a bloody tear drip from her ice blue eye down her pale face.


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Why isn't information enough? Facts. Dates. Names. Why do we as humans need more in order to understand our world?


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As Americans, we spend a lot of time working. Sometimes we even think if we put in only 40 hours a week we're slacking. No judgment here, but if we are going to work that much, we should like what we're doing at work — right? 


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Thank god it's Friday! Right? What's so wrong with working hard all week and wanting to go out and let loose Friday night? Nothing really — except that when you look at the work week through this lens, you are more likely to set yourself up for unhappiness.


Why You Should Read Aloud to Your Kids

Sep 4, 2015
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It's no surprise that reading aloud to your kids is good for them. 

But why is it so important? What's going on in a child's brain when they're hearing stories of giant fruit carrying orphans across the ocean? On this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the child's brain on books.


What's Wrong With Rewarding Mediocrity?

Aug 28, 2015

Kids these days typically get a trophy for participation in most events. Some argue that the practice ultimately serves as a disincentive for a child to compete. Others ask, if your kid is smiling, what more do you want?

In this week's edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke look into the system of reward and evaluate what we are rewarding and why.

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So you just got that raise you've been working toward, and a new project starts tomorrow, and you're making great money, but — you don't really like the work. You're moving up, but you're not happy. It might be time to re-evaluate your situation, and maybe get on a different proverbial treadmill.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the concept of The Hedonic Treadmill, and what we can do to set ourselves up for a happier life.

Failure is a word that carries a lot of baggage, arousing emotional responses that we’d usually rather avoid. 

What about success? Why does the thought of success conjure images and feelings of comfort and satisfaction. This week, "Two Guys on Your Head" examine how the heights of success and the "training wheels" of failure impact our everyday lives.

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Our sensory systems are pretty smart. Typically we like things that are going to be good for us to ingest, and dislike things that are going to be bad for us to ingest. Pretty simple right? Not so much!

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about benefit of the disgust reaction, and how we as human beings co-opt that system and use it more conceptually than it what it’s meant for. Therefore disgust has come to have a moral dimension to it.

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Food can be delicious, heart-warming and life-sustaining. So, how did eating become a constant battle with the refrigerator?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Bob Duke and Dr. Arthur Markman discuss the challenges in maintaining a healthy diet and how changing our perspectives on food may be a vital approach to solving these problems.

Virtual Or No, Therapy Can Be Beneficial

Jul 23, 2015
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Therapy can be life-changing. However, anyone who’s ever seen a bad therapist likely agrees, on at least some level, that virtual therapy may be a step in the right direction. But is it actually effective?

Virtual therapy offers a true judgment-free zone. It also removes much of the shame and fear associated with telling even (or perhaps especially) the kindest of therapist one’s deepest and darkest secrets. It’s also much more convenient and, likely, inexpensive.

However, a good therapist can sense what’s going on beneath the surface. Due to the way the brain is structured, we can rationalize our emotional problems in a way that fits into the context of our current environment and feels safe, which can have little to do with accuracy. A good therapist also provides advice on how to face these issues, as we become ready to hear it.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss the purposes of therapy and provide some perspective on the roles virtual therapy can and can’t fill.

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