Coming Soon: Texas Standard

Get a behind-the-scenes peek into the planning and production of KUT's upcoming daily news program.

We're working to bring Central Texans crisp, up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle, the environment, technology, innovation and money from a uniquely Texas perspective.  

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Life & Arts
6:05 am
Fri January 31, 2014

'The Obedient Assassin' Tells the Story of Trotsky's Killer

John P. Davidson at the KUT Studio
Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Imagine – you have it all – a life of luxury, famous friends, a beautiful lover. You are a good, supportive friend – happy and content. And it’s all a lie.

The truth keeps you up at night, tortures you during the day. But you can’t change who you are.

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Life & Arts
8:35 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Austin's Ray Benson Goes it Alone, Gets Raves

'Brother Ray' Benson, minus the cowboy hat
Credit Kerrville Folk Festival

Though Ray Benson's been the de facto musical ambassador of Austin now for decades, he admits that by stepping out as a solo artist for the first time in more than a decade, he's just now getting to do what he always dreamed of doing when he started out in music as a teenager.  

"I didn't think I was good enough," he confesses.  

Benson's new album, "A Little Piece" seems to offer ample evidence he's good enough, at least if the critics are to be believed. In fact, Tom Semioli of the Huffington Post places Benson's new recording up there with the likes of breakthroughs like Dylan's "Blood on the Tracks" and Willie Nelson's "Phases and Stages."

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Life & Arts
2:05 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

"Shoe Burnin'" Collects Stories of Southern Soles

'Shoe Burnin'' collects stories from over a dozen authors.
facebook.com/theshoeburnin

It started one night with a box of shoes. 

Some Alabama artists ran out of firewood and, they surmised, a box of shoes seemed an appropriate enough substitute for traditional kindling. So began the first shoe burning — a well-kept Southern literary tradition of telling stories for each sole burned.  

In Shoe Burnin': Stories of Southern Soul over a dozen authors and songwriters collected their tales in a combination of musical and literary sojourns.

Education
8:45 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Should American Universities Boycott their Israeli Counterparts?

Hunter Rawlings says U.S. universities should not boycott Israeli universities in response to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict because it would lead to a political "Pandora's Box."
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

The passing of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has raised talk of his legacy, especially with respect to the long-standing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.  Several groups of American scholars, including the American Studies Association, are calling for US universities to boycott their Israeli counterparts. The president of the University of Texas at Austin, William Powers, is hosting a conference of several key figures in higher education this week. One such figure, Hunter Rawlings, President of the Association of American Universities, spoke with KUT's David Brown.

Texas
10:12 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Feds Pick Texas As One of Six Drone Testing Sites

A MQ-1 Predator drone, presented to the Texas Air National Guard in Houston, Texas in 2009.
flickr.com/e06158

Update 12/30/13: The Federal Aviation Administration has selected Texas A&M - Corpus Christi as one of six drone testing sites across the U.S. The FAA says the Corpus Christi site "plans to develop system safety requirements for UAS vehicles and operations with a goal of protocols and procedures for airworthiness testing." 

Sites in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota and Virginia were also chosen.

Hear more about A&M's drone plans in the interview below.

Original story 10/09/13: From Manhattan to Afghanistan, drones have become big news and big business. Now, there’s a move to turn the skies over Texas into one of the world’s leading drone test sites. 

KUT’s David Brown talks with Ron George, a senior research development officer at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi , and one of the planners of a new drone development center.

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Business
7:00 am
Mon December 30, 2013

The Texas Economy in 2014: Signs of a Slight Slowdown?

Dallas Fed Economist Keith Phillips
Credit Dallas Federal Reserve Bank

For the nation's economy,  2013 is a story of a continued comeback following a devastating recession. 

And for Texas?  Well, the story's slightly different.  

Keith Phillips, analyst with the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank says there's no question 2013 was a good year for the Texas economy with growth in most sectors.

Phillips says the low cost of living, in addition to the low cost of doing business in Texas has helped the Lone Star State maintain a job growth rate a full percentage point higher than the national average in 2013.  But the energy exploration boom that's been fueling an expansion of jobs, construction and exports appears to be tapering off.

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Energy & Environment
6:15 am
Mon December 23, 2013

How Much Energy Do We Use at the Holidays?

The holidays can mean lumps of coal - not in stockings, but in power plants.
flickr.com/pagedooley

The holidays are here and it might surprise people how energy-intensive they can be. Commentator Michael Webber is keeping a list - and checking it twice - on some ways we burn fuel this time of year.

For starters: There's the energy involved in travel to visit family – those long road trips over the hills and through the woods to visit Grandma, plane flights, even train travel.

Then there's the energy for heating our homes during cold weather. In the northeast that's likely fuel oil; gas in the Southwest; and electricity in the South. Then there are all those presents!

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Sports
6:30 am
Fri December 20, 2013

From NBA All-Star to Austin Toro, Josh Howard Shoots for a Comeback

Following an injury, fomer NBA player Josh Howard is regaining his footing with the Austin Toros.
NBA Development League

Not even four years ago, Josh Howard was making more than $10 million a year playing in the NBA. Today, he plays for the Austin Toros in the NBA's Development League (or "D-League"), with a salary of $25,000.  

After a string of debilitating injuries, including some freak on-the-court accidents, doctors gave him a grim prognosis for recovery last year.  The 33-year-old faced the very real prospect of retiring far earlier than he'd planned.  

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Business
3:26 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Do Women CEOs Have a Tougher Time Pitching Start-Ups?

Dr. Hill working with a lab assistant at Spot On Sciences.
Credit Spot On Sciences

In baseball, the crowd holds its breath, waiting for the pitch.

In the business world, pitching is similar: suspense can be a killer, and ideas often get knocked down. Scrappy start-ups and venture capital abound in the modern economy, but success isn’t always guaranteed.

Dr. Jeanette Hill, CEO of Spot On Sciences and home blood test HemaSpot knows pitching – and it's nothing like what you’ve seen on "Shark Tank."

“You’ve got about 60 seconds, sometimes up to two minutes,” she tells KUT’s David Brown. “You have to get your idea across, you have to sell the audience … get it out there without stumbling.”

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UT Board of Regents
8:19 am
Thu December 12, 2013

UT Regents Put President Powers' Job On the Agenda: How We Got Here

UT Austin President Bill Powers' job is up for discussion during the UT Board of Regents executive session Thursday. It's the latest development in what's become a standoff between state leadership.
flickr.com/thetexastribune

The UT Board of Regents is expected to discuss the employment of University of Texas at Austin President Bill Powers during its executive session today. It’s the first time his employment has been placed on the agenda for discussion – and the latest development in what’s become a power struggle among state leadership.

The scene: boardrooms, committee chambers or behind closed doors. The characters: men who hold power in the Texas capitol, or the UT Tower. But how did the situation get to this point?

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Texas
6:55 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Why Texas Can't Withold 911 Tapes

A makeshift memorial to the victims of the Sandy Hook mass shooting.
Voice of America via Wikimedia Commons

On Dec. 14, it will have been exactly one year since the school massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut that killed a total of 28 people, including 20 children.

Over the past several days, national news media organizations have been struggling with the question of whether to publish the recently released 911 calls. Clearly, many victims' families simply want to be left alone – to not be forced to relive the horror. And yet a Connecticut judge ruled to release those tapes, citing state law. 

Other states specifically prohibit the release of 911 tapes. What about Texas? 

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Life & Arts
7:55 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Amy Tan's New Book 'The Valley of Amazement' is Filled With Family Secrets

The Valley of Amazement
Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

It’s been eight years since Amy Tan’s last book. But critics are already saying “The Valley of Amazement” was worth waiting for. 

It’s a complicated story of mothers and daughters, secrets and lies, the past and the present, China and America. And – perhaps above all – it’s about women’s fierce wills to survive.

KUT's Emily Donahue spoke with Amy Tan about her new book. She was five years into writing a different novel, Tan says, when she took a new look at an old family photo.

“I had a photo of my grandmother sitting on my desk and it was my favorite photo of her,” Tan says. “She looks quite beautiful and dreamy eyed, and it is in fact the photo that is on the hard cover edition of ‘The Bonesetter's Daughter.’” 

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Politics
7:38 am
Mon December 2, 2013

Texas, Video Games and the Military-Entertainment Complex

Credit Eamon Dolan/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Dwight Eisenhower famously warned about the military-industrial complex and it’s influence. Here, some 52 years later, the nation has a new, powerful influencer: what author Corey Mead calls the “military-entertainment complex”.

The phrase draws from WWII propaganda films, but presently “refers to the link between the military and video game industry,” Mead says. He's the author of "War Play: Video Games and the Future of Armed Conflict." Listen to his interview with KUT's David Brown below:

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Author Interviews
8:57 am
Fri November 29, 2013

'Dallas Noir' Explores the City's Alluring Shimmer and Seedy Underbelly

The cover of Dallas Noir, a new collection of fictional stories.
Akashic Books

While Pulitzer Prize winner Larry McMurty described Dallas in Texas Monthly as “a second-rate city that wishes it were first-rate,” literary agent and editor David Hale Smith prefers a different description. This one’s found in the lines of Jimmie Dale Gilmore’s song “Dallas:"

Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes

A steel and concrete soul in a warm-hearted love disguise.

“It’s one of the great lyrics of all time. The song is a poem, but it really nails Dallas, and of course nails the essence of this book we put together,” Smith says. He sat down with KUT's David Brown to discuss that new book, “Dallas Noir." 

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Energy & Environment
7:54 am
Wed November 27, 2013

LISTEN: What's the Carbon Footprint of Your Thanksgiving Dinner?

The traditional Thanksgiving fixings cost a lot of energy to produce - and consume.
flickr.com/silvershaina

As you sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, consider this: how much energy it takes to produce and consume that food.

Throughout the year, transportation is responsible for 28 percent of our energy consumption. And there's a non-trivial bump right around Thanksgiving time. According to USA Today, more than 25 million people in the United States are expected to fly for the Thanksgiving holiday. 

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