Willingham

Tamir Kalifa via Texas Tribune

The surviving relatives of Cameron Todd Willingham gathered at the Capitol on Wednesday after sending an application to clear his name, 12 years after his execution for a 1991 fire that killed his three young children.

Photo by KUT News.

Texas Attorney General Gregg Abbott today has ended further investigation into the high-profile Cameron Todd Willingham arson case. Willingham was executed in 2004 for a 1991 fire that killed his three daughters. Fire experts have since discredited much of the evidence used to prove Willingham set the fire. 

Photo courtesy of the Texas Tribune.

Head of Controversial Science Commission Keeps Post, For Now

After a contentious hearing Monday, the Texas Senate Nominations Committee voted 4-2 to recommend approving Forensic Science Commission Chairman John Bradley's appointment.  Bradley is also Williamson County's district attorney.  He faced heated questioning yesterday, especially from Sen. Rodney Ellis D-Houston, over his handling of the high profile Cameron Todd Willingham case. 

Photo by Matt Largey for KUT News.

Willingham Probe Continues

The Texas Forensic Science Commission will once again take up the Cameron Todd Willingham arson case today.  The panel will consider testimony it heard earlier this month from fire experts who differed on whether the original investigation was sound.  Some experts say investigators relied on flawed science and that the fire should not have been ruled arson. 

Photo by Matt Largey for KUT News.

A state panel in Austin has been hearing today from fire experts about the high profile Cameron Todd Willingham arson conviction.  Willingham was convicted and put to death for setting the fire that killed his three daughters in 1991.  He was executed in 2004, But some experts have said the conviction was based on bad science. 

The Texas Forensic Science Commission reviewed the science that was used in the investigation and whether or not investigators were negligent. KUT's Matt Largey is covering panel.

Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Beall/via Flickr

Willingham Case Back in the Spotlight

A state panel in Austin today will hear from fire experts on the high-profile Cameron Todd Willingham arson case.  Willingham was convicted and put to death for an arson-ruled fire that killed his three daughters in 1991.  Some experts say the conviction was based on bad science.  The Texas Forensic Science Commission is examining the fire science used in the case, and how scientific practices have changed since the 90s.