Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

With World Cup fever peaking, flag stores in Austin have been selling out of the old red, white and blue. The oldest red, white and blue, in fact – the Dutch flag, in use since 1572.

Flag stores always stock up for the Fourth of July, says Michele Kronberg, the self-described “boss-queen” of Austin Flag and Flagpole on South First Street. “It’s our busiest time of the year,” she says. “We don’t really have a Christmas season.” But exploding demand for foreign flags, driven by the World Cup, caught her off guard.

Listen: A World Cup Translation for Texans

Jun 27, 2014
Millennium Entertainment

Been following the World Cup?  If so, you can stop right here.  

This one's for the rest of us. 

Sonny Carl Davis (you know, that guy from "Bernie" who broke Texas into five states?) has been thinking about America's new love affair with what much of the rest of the world calls football.  

Sonny's been doing so much thinking, he reckoned it high time to offer something of an explainer for fellow Texans baffled by the phenomenon. Texans like … him. Take two minutes to listen:

Big Tex, the beloved but odd State Fair of Texas icon, has been named the country’s quirkiest landmark. 

After four weeks of online voting, the larger-than-life cowboy earned the most votes in the USA Today and 10Best "Best Quirky Landmark" contest. The winner was announced Wednesday. 

Flickr user David Ingram,

Mount Bonnell and Barton Springs are two of Austin's eternal treasures –unblemished reminders of Austin's natural beauty.

But to a handful of reviewers on Yelp, they're totally overrated.

Mount Bonnell's scenic overlook rates a solid four stars on Yelp; Austin's crown jewel, Barton Springs Pool, clocks in at four-and-a-half.  But proving you can't please everyone, a collection of contrary reviews offer an antithetical take on these two Austin institutions.

It’s not yet autumn but fall webworms are showing up on trees across Central Texas.

The caterpillars form webbing on leaves – and spend much of their lives eating those leaves.

"Typically people notice they have fall webworms when they start to see the webbing actually starting to cover the tips of the branches and, if they look closely at those webs or they break open those webs, they'll actually see the caterpillars inside," Wizzie Brown says.