Twitter

Laura Rice, KUT News

I spent two weeks in the West African country of Ghana in late January and early February. The trip was part of an exchange program through the International Center for Journalists and was sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

The goal of my journey was to learn about the media climate of an another country and to collect stories to share via KUT. Along the way, I tweeted.

Here's a look at the story my tweets tell:

We're preparing to bid adieu to 2013, which means it's time for the ever-reliable year-end lists. NPR's Book Concierge lets you explore the best books of the year. NPR Music chronicled the best albums. And Twitter is out with the biggest tweets and most-tweeted moments of 2013.

If you have a Twitter account, there's an excellent chance you already know about Sharknado, SyFy's meteorological-marine horror movie that premiered last night. When I tell you that a lot of people were tweeting about Sharknado, I'm not lying.

Not to mention ... well, you know. Possibly NPR personalities.

What happens after we die? For millennia it's been both a question and a debate among mortal humans, but in the 21st century, there's a new twist: What happens to our social media life once we've left this earth (and does the afterlife have Wi-Fi)?

KUT News

Please don’t say your New Year’s resolution is to lose weight. As full of merit as your resolution is, it may not be tweeted out by city staff.  

Starting today and through Dec. 31, the city of Austin is encouraging Austinites to text their New Year resolutions to 512-518-5879.  But there’s a catch: you need to think about how your resolution will make the city better. City staff will then go through them and pick the most interesting responses.  

twitter.com/VinceYoung

Vince Young has taken to Twitter to defend himself against media scrutiny, including reports the former Longhorn has hit hard times. Yesterday, Young tweeted

"It’s a shame to see people revel in and rally around negativity in the media but I guess it’s to be expected. Yes, I need a job, who doesn’t.”

Young has taken to Twitter ever since the Associated Press released a story describing his financial and occupational difficulties.

The AP wrote on Wednesday that “Vince Young finds himself without a team and with only a fraction of the money he received from a contract that guaranteed him $26 million.” A quote from his attorney was also included, stating: "I would just say that Vince needs a job."

In his defense, Young tweeted the following:

We are working to rectify some unfortunate finical (sic) losses, which stemmed from betrayal by those I trusted most.

But these rumors are disheartening & just untrue . I’ll keep pushing through regardless. God Bless. Trill