travis county

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Voters approved a Travis County bond package totaling almost $185 million Tuesday by a wide margin. More than 73 percent of voters cast a ballot in favor of both bond packages. The funding will go toward capital improvements across the county, as well as extending services to parts of eastern Travis County, Manor and Pflugerville.

stephenvelasco/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Travis County, home to Austin, has been working to build a better voting system – one that satisfies the need to maintain security and accessibility for voters. Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir, the chief election official, has been a part of developing the system, called STAR Vote, which would have replaced the current Hart InterCivic eSlate system that has been in use since 2001. That system cost roughly $7 million, and has seen several security augmentations over the years.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Travis County voters will decide in November whether to approve $185 million in bonds. Much of that money will pay for projects meant to fix longstanding problems in the eastern part of the county.

The projects are prioritized in what Precinct 1 Commissioner Jeff Travillion calls a “health and safety” bond.

Sarah Montgomery for KUT News

Governor Greg Abbott's move to cut grants over Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez's move to limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities jeopardizes a program aimed at keeping children with their parents while they undergo drug treatment.

We learned more about this from Brandi Grissom, the Austin bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News.


Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

“[A] dangerous game of political Russian roulette.” That’s how Texas Gov. Greg Abbott described Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez’s immigration policy, which was released Friday. And, this morning, Abbott told Fox News that he's directing lawmakers to draft a bill that would penalize similar policies and threatened to remove Hernandez from office.

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