transportation

Flickr/faungg (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Traffic, congestion, delayed drive times – problems Texans know all too well.

The state's population boom has lawmakers and transportation officials scrambling to alleviate traffic issues. Last session the Legislature passed a constitutional amendment diverting millions from Texas' Rainy Day Fund into transportation projects. While one easy answer to our transportation woes is to build more roads, not everyone agrees.

 


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

From The Austin Monitor: With their eyes on a possible transportation bond election in November, City Council members on Thursday kicked off a process for determining which items the public will be asked to weigh in on this fall.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: The Texas Transportation Commission unveiled a$1.3 billion plan Wednesday targeted at reducing traffic congestion on some of the most clogged Texas roadways.

The plan calls for the Texas Department of Transportation to direct funds for 14 roadway projects specifically designed to relieve gridlock around the state's five largest cities: Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, Austin and Fort Worth.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

The president of General Motors now says plans with Lyft to bring a fleet of self-driving cars to Austin were only hypothetical. But, what kind of regulations do self-driving cars face in Texas?

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

Austin taxpayers may be asked to help pay for improvements on I-35 this year. Mayor Steve Adler is floating the idea of a bond election in November.

Austin voters have rejected a number of bonds in the past few years, but, as Mayor Adler tells KUT’s Nathan Bernier in this uncut conversation, affordability and transportation spending are not mutually exclusive. 

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