Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

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From Texas Standard.

Few modern creations match the convenience of online holiday shopping – that is, unless you’ve had a package stolen from your front porch. Across the country, mail and delivery burglaries are on the rise, but one central Texas Police chief knows just the place place to send packages this holiday season.

Last week, the Round Rock Police Department launched Operation Front Porch, a program aimed at reducing the number of front door burglaries during the holiday season. Residents can ship packages directly to the city’s police department address and pick them up during normal business hours once they arrive.

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From Texas Standard.

The Dallas Morning News conducted an investigation this summer about what happens to kids after a mother’s arrest. In the process, they stumbled on an interesting fact – more women are being jailed in Texas, even though arrests of women have dropped.

Investigative reporter Cary Aspinwall found that the number of women in county jails across Texas awaiting trial has increased about 50 percent since 2011.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez announced Wednesday morning that she is running for governor, giving Texas Democrats a serious candidate for the top job with five days until the candidate filing deadline for the 2018 primaries.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

Several Texas state senators on Tuesday expressed support for the closure of at least some of the state’s remaining youth lockups.

The lawmakers' comments, made at a Senate Finance Committee hearing, came as the Texas Juvenile Justice Department is entangled in a sexual abuse scandal that has led to a 10-year prison sentence for one guard and the arrest of three women at the Gainesville State School.

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From Texas Standard.

Last month, the Dallas Morning News uncovered an internal email from the Texas Juvenile Justice Department. It said that at least four staffers at the Gainesville State School, a lockup for juvenile offenders, could be sent to prison for sexual misconduct at the facility. The Juvenile Justice Department is no stranger to scandal. And to fix it, a set of advocacy groups have an idea – close all of its facilities and completely rethink how the state houses young offenders.

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