Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

KUTX Austin

From Texas Standard:

Ten years ago, Joe Lewis – a 20-something from the Austin suburbs –  first tried to storm the stage. By day, he was delivering fish for a local seafood restaurant; by night, he was putting his unique spin on the blues that Austin was best known for. With a sound that evokes Stax and Muscle Shoals more than the cosmic cowboys, Lewis stands out in Austin.

 

bigbirdz/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A new survey reports that 15 percent of undergraduate women at the University of Texas at Austin say they’ve been raped. The survey, conducted by the university’s School of Social Work’s Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, is the most comprehensive of its kind ever done. The survey polled 28,000 students during the 2015 academic year.

When she was 23, Sophie Alice Callahan wrote the first novel by an American Indian woman, titled Wynema, A Child of the Forest. The book tells the story of a Creek girl and her teacher, an Anglo woman from the South. Callahan used the cross-cultural friendship between the two women to educate Anglo readers about the rights of Native Americans and of women. The book highlights the women’s opinions about the suffrage movement and the painful realities of U.S. Indian policies, like the effects of the Dawes Act and the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

It’s no surprise that the Texas population continue to grow. The state’s major cities are all getting bigger, but it’s the areas surrounding the urban core – the suburbs – where growth rates are highest.

John Morgan/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Reform of the Texas foster care system has been an elusive goal for state lawmakers. A federal judge ruled the system unconstitutional and "broken" two years ago. One proposal that has received support in the current legislative session would have the state contract with religious organizations and other non-profits to provide care for foster children. But the idea has received pushback from some of the religious groups themselves.

 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Legislature’s two houses have about nine weeks to approve a balanced two-year budget. But disagreement over accounting “gimmickry” is dividing lawmakers in the House and Senate. The Senate finance committee approved a $107 billion budget, but House Speaker Joe Straus says that the senators relied on questionable accounting practices to avoid tapping into the state’s rainy day fund, a savings account funded mainly by oil and gas tax revenue.

Consuelo González Amezcua (called Chelo), a poet and artist, gained acclaim for the "filigree art" drawings she did in Texas, which drew inspiration from pre-Columbian, Mexican American and Egyptian history. Her unique drawing technique reflected the elaborate metal work found in Mexican jewelry.

 

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A House vote on the American Health Care Act – the GOP replacement for the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare – is slated for Thursday. But some conservatives are wary – they worry the bill will leave too many people uninsured. Others say it doesn't go far enough in repealing the original law.

 

Terry Canales/Flickr

From Texas Standard:

What's in a name? It turns out that question has relevance long after Shakespeare's time. In fact, it's at the center of a bill before the Texas Legislature this session.

 

  In 1942, six months after the U.S. entry into World War II, the Army Air Force, facing a shortage of male combat pilots, turned to pioneering pilot Jacqueline Cochran to launch a flight-training program for women. Of the 25,000 women who applied, 1,830 were accepted, and 1,074 completed the training to become Women Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs.

 

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Maria Aberra put on her red school uniform shirt with the Texas emblem like she does every morning — but instead of heading to her charter school, she drove 20 miles with her mom Tuesday to the Capitol to testify on school choice.

Joy Diaz/Texas Standard

From Texas standard:

It's not common for a teenager to hang out in the office of a pro bono attorney whose clients are Texas death row inmates. But, that's where 15-year-olds Sebe Shearer and Heidi Ellis are.

 

"I've known Sebe for a really long time now since elementary school and I also needed volunteer hours – so I decided to come with her,” Ellis says.

From Texas Standard:

The U.S. House Intelligence Committee quizzed FBI Director James Comey on Monday over the Trump campaign’s possible collusion with Russia and President Donald Trump’s Twitter allegations that President Barack Obama wiretapped Trump Tower.

 

Lydia Mendoza — known as “La Alondra de la Frontera,” or the lark of the border — was one of the most talented and popular and talented musicians in the history of Tejano music. Mendoza was born in Houston into a musical family of Mexican immigrants in 1916. She performed on the streets with her family’s band, which won an audition in San Antonio for OK Records in 1928.

 

From Texas Standard:

Here in Texas, if you’re headed to a Buc-ee’s, there’s little confusion about what that means -- Beaver Nuggets, an expansive jerky selection and clean bathrooms. Those are images closely tied to the convenience store chain and it is suing to keep it that way.

In the early time before European, Mexican and American explorers arrived in present-day Texas, an incalculable number of Indian women made this place home. Unfortunately, the names of these women are unknown, but researchers are learning who they are and what they did.

 

Perhaps most famous for the sound of her sonorous voice, Barbara Jordan articulated the emotions of many when as member of the House Judiciary Committee, she defended the U.S. Constitution against its subversion during the Watergate scandal in 1972. Using herself as a symbol of the people who had once been excluded from it, she said, “I am not going to sit here and be an idle spectator to the destruction of the Constitution.”

 

Nicknamed Big Mama for both her size and her dynamic voice, blues legend Willie Mae Thornton grew up singing in the choir in her father’s church near Montgomery, Ala. She won a singing contest in 1941 at age 15 and attracted the attention of Atlanta music promoter Sammy Green, who signed her for his Hot Harlem Review.

 

Larry D. Moore/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

If President Donald Trump has his way, the U.S. air traffic control system will be privatized. The idea is the first bullet point in the transportation section of the White House budget blueprint. Some major airlines including Texas-based American and Southwest support privatization of air traffic control.

 

Best known for her landmark bill that guarantees college admission to Texas high school students in the top 10 percent of their graduation classes, Irma Rangel was the first Tejana elected to the Texas House of Representatives.

 

Rangel began her career participating in workers’ marches in the 1960s and working as a teacher and a principal. After becoming a lawyer, she was assistant district attorney in Corpus Christi, insisting on equal pay before she took the job. She opened her own law practice and got involved in local politics.

 

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