Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

During Hurricane Harvey, the Army Corps of Engineers decided to open the floodgates to release water from the Addicks and Barker Reservoirs. Thousands of downstream properties flooded. Now, many of those affected are suing to recoup damages from that flood.

They’re arguing that the government essentially took their property without permission when they released water from the dams.

L.M. Sixel, a business reporter with the Houston Chronicle, says it’s turning into quite the frenzy for lawyers of all stripes.

United States Army/Wikimedia Commons (Public domain)

From Texas Standard.

In 2014, the Obama administration secured the release of Bowe Bergdahl from captivity in Afghanistan by agreeing to release five Taliban prisoners being held at Guantanamo. At first, Bergdahl’s homecoming was celebrated as a hero’s return. What most Americans didn’t know at the time was that, back in 2009, Bergdahl had deserted his post in Afghanistan before he disappeared. He spent five years as a captive of the Taliban.

Martin do Nascimento/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

It’s mid-October and kids in Port Aransas are finally going back to school in their own community. Classrooms have been closed in the Gulf Coast town since Harvey made landfall. Though Port Aransas Independent School District finally opened its doors, not all of the classrooms are quite where they need to be.

Larry D. Moore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

While the Trump administration says the "war on coal" is over, market forces are having their say when it comes to the fossil fuel, closing plants in several Texas communities.

Texas' largest generator of coal-powered energy, Luminant, says it is ceasing operations at two plants in the state. The company says Texas' competitive energy market and cheap natural gas  make these older coal-fired plants unprofitable. Another Texas coal operator has already announced plans to close two facilities.

bruthanick/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The number of craft breweries in Texas is up 990 percent in the last 12 years, according to CBRE, a real estate services company. Its recent report found a big increase in the demand for commercial real estate for these breweries. Also aiding the trend are changes in Texas law that make it easier for brewers to sell their beer, whether on-site at the brewery, or via other channels.

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