Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

TORLEY/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Amazon accounts for more than 40 percent of online sales in the U.S. and that means a lot of deliveries, especially during the holiday season.

Getting those packages to your front door is the job of individuals who are part of a program called Amazon Flex. Independent contractors deliver Amazon orders using their own vehicles. It’s a little like Uber for packages. The way the program operates has raised questions about how workers are treated, and whether they should be classified as Amazon employees, rather than contractors.

Eric Gay

 

More than two days after a U.S. Border Patrol agent was killed and another seriously wounded while on patrol in West Texas, exactly what happened to the agents is still unclear.

Agent Rogelio Martinez, 36, died Sunday after sustaining severe head and bodily injuries. His partner, who hasn’t been named, is recovering from his injuries and is in intensive care, according to federal authorities.

Kate Groetzinger

From Texas Standard.

Earlier this month, the Texas State Board of Education rejected a Mexican-American studies textbook, leaving public school teachers without state-approved materials to teach the topic. But that doesn’t mean schools can’t offer ethnic studies courses. In fact, a handful of public schools across the state have elective courses on ethnic studies topics, which are designed by local teachers and administrators with little direction from the state.

Diego A/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

The investigation into what led a gunman to kill 26 people at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs is ongoing, and law enforcement are still trying to access a key piece of evidence – his phone.

Jill Ament

From Texas Standard:

Of the 3,500 structures in Vidor, Texas – a town outside of Beaumont – more than 2,000 were flooded in some way by Harvey. The First United Methodist Church in Vidor served as a shelter for around 200 flooded out residents in the town of about 11,000 people. That includes the parsonage where Pastor John Mooney and his family live. Many of his church members' homes were also hit.

"The majority of them were actually rescued by their neighbor, by their fellow Vidorian folks with boats, so a lot of these folks, their homes were ruined, they were flooded, they were damaged,” Mooney says. “So a lot of them don't have anywhere to go."

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