Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

Shelby Knowles/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:

Facing outrage on social media and among students, faculty and alumni, Texas A&M University officials said Wednesday that they didn't invite a white nationalist leader who is scheduled to speak on campus next month. 

Patrick Connelly/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Campsites are full across Texas for the Thanksgiving holiday – at time to share food with friends and family. But it’s safe to say the average tourist visiting Big Bend Park this season doesn’t want to share their tent and food with a true local of the west Texas wilderness: the black bear.

 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera, Texas Tribune

A federal judge in Sherman has blocked a White House effort to make millions more workers eligible for overtime pay, handing a victory to Texas and 20 others states that had challenged the new Labor Department rule.

U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant granted a nationwide injunction Tuesday against the rule, which was set to go into effect Dec. 1. The rule aimed to double the salary threshold under which employees qualify for overtime pay, extending it to an estimated 4.2 million more workers. 

JayJayP/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Dallas and bankruptcy are two words you normally wouldn’t find in the same sentence. After all, Texas is practically recession-proof and Dallas has one of the fastest-growing economies among large cities in the U.S.

Screenshot Sound Collectiv #DallsUp

From Texas Standard:

New York, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Nashville – all pride themselves as cities with rich musical scenes. And in Texas, those bragging rights tend to go to Houston and Austin. But a new documentary turns the spotlight on another side of the business, staking a claim for another Texas city: the beat makers of the Big D.

Beth Cortez-Neavel/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

The day after Donald Trump was elected president, Nov. 9, a Twitter user posted a picture of a few charter buses in downtown Austin, along with a now-deleted message: "Anti-Trump protestors in Austin today are not as organic as they seem. Here are the buses they came in. #fakeprotests #trump2016 #austin."

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is meeting Monday morning with President-elect Donald Trump.

Perry arrived at Trump Tower in New York City at 11:07 a.m., according to a pool report. He did not respond to requests for comment before entering an elevator.

Police are still looking for a suspect who ambushed and fatally shot a San Antonio Police officer Sunday.  it happened during a routine traffic stop near the police department’s downtown headquarters.

San Antonio Police Chief William McManus says it was just before noon when 50-year old Detective Benjamin Marconi stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation. Another car- a black Mitsubishi Galant- pulled in behind Marconi’s squad car.  Marconi was still behind the wheel when the suspect got out and moved towards him.

Courtesy Moonlight Film

From Texas Standard:

The film “Moonlight” tells the story of a young black man struggling with his identity and sexuality. The film is set in Miami – but its breakout star is Texan.

Trevante Rhodes is a busy guy these days. He’s juggling television and film roles along with press appearances. In-between, there’s maintenance.

 

Texas Public Radio

From Texas Standard:

A few years after the approval of the legal medical use of cannabidiol (CBD) oil in Texas, the Department of Public Safety wants to raise business fees of selling it. CBD oil is a non-psychoactive form of cannabis made from hemp and is legal in the state only for the medical treatment of people diagnosed with intractable epilepsy.

 

©1989 Delta Haze Corporation (under fair use)

From Texas Standard:

Houston has hip-hop, New Orleans has jazz, the Delta has the blues. What about San Antonio?

The South Texas Museum of Popular Culture is celebrating its role in the national songbook this weekend, launching an exhibition commemorating the 80th anniversary of the San Antonio recordings of blues legend Robert Johnson.

 


Theopolisme/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

The Dallas Mavericks are boycotting stays at hotels owned by President-elect Donald Trump. And #grabyourwallet is trending on social media sites – a shoutout for Trump opponents to boycott companies that do business with Trump enterprises, or with companies whose CEOs gave money to Trump’s election campaign. Some of the companies include Amazon, Bed Bath & Beyond, Neiman Marcus and T.J. Maxx.


MellieRene4/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

This is part three of a series on “suicide by cop.” What does it mean? Who are the victims? Why is this happening? 

On New Year’s Day 2015, Marisela Martinez walked into the Hidalgo County Jail swinging what was later determined to be a BB pistol. She said she just committed a robbery at a nearby bail bonds business and she'd shoot anyone who came near. People in the waiting room ran for safety. Officers arrived on the scene. The woman screamed: "Shoot me! Shoot me!"

The case looks like the textbook scenario of someone attempting "suicide by cop” – instances which are happening more and more frequently. But are incidents like this, in fact, on the rise? Or are we simply more plugged in and therefore hearing more about them? 

 


Tony Webster/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)

From Texas Standard:

In October, the husband of a 26-year-old Austin woman called 911 to request help for her from a mental health officer. A few hours later, she was dead.

Beth Cortez-Neavel/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It's the first day for Texas lawmakers to file bills for the upcoming session at the Statehouse. Competing for the attention and votes of state lawmakers are issues of education funding and safety for the most vulnerable Texans – foster kids.

Lauren McGaughy, who'll be covering the 85th Legislature for the Dallas Morning News, says bill filers often "front-load" so a lot of bills are filed on the first day.


Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Something about the events of the past few days suggests there's a word we'll be hearing a whole lot more in coming months, if not years: nationalism.

Jeremi Suri, a professor at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, says the period between World War II and September 11 was a period of globalism.

 


Courtesy Focus Films

From Texas Standard

Richard and Mildred Loving were at the center of a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case in the 1960s – Loving v. Virginia. But you probably haven’t heard their story. Jeff Nichols hadn’t either.

Pages