Texas Standard

In the 21st century, what happens in Texas drives the American narrative.  Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines. Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions. A one-hour daily news magazine, Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States. Visit TexasStandard.org to read our newest stories and hear our latest show.   

Weather Puts 'American Sniper' Trial on Ice

Alain Stephens

Jo Ivester joins Texas Standard to talk about life in Mount Bayou, Mississippi, and what she learned through her mother’s work.

gsfc/flickr

From Texas Standard:

When you think of space, what do you see? Planets, stars, maybe a satellite or a shuttle? Well, some business people are seeing green. A group of space entrepreneurs is meeting in Austin this week to lay the framework for how Texas could be the launch pad for the private space industry.

Gage Skidmore/wikimedia commons

From Texas Standard:

The first three Republican contenders for president — Senators Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, and now Marco Rubio, all have Tea Party ties. Rubio is the latest to announce candidacy and, despite being considered a Tea Party darling not long ago, his current views on immigration have driven a wedge between the two.

Succo/Pixabay

From Texas Standard:

When a hazing incident makes the news, we usually think of college campuses – a fraternity rush gone wrong, or an initiation ritual for a sport team. But not always. That was the case this week in Texas.

Five members of the Ellis County Volunteer Fire Department have been charged with aggravated sexual assault. The incident allegedly occurred back in January as part of a hazing ritual for new recruits.

Photo via flickr.com/reynermedia

We all know how the hiring process works: A hiring manager posts an opening, describes their ideal candidate and waits for the influx of resumes. After doing some interviews, the manager has to make a gut decision, a subjective assessment - and the research shows that more often than not, they’ll pick someone who has a really similar background as them.

A Spanish Guide for Texas Gringos

Apr 8, 2015
Joe McGowan/Flickr

From Texas Standard:

With Texas' rapidly changing demographics, many have come to the personal conclusion that it's simply insufficient to be fluent in one language alone.

But for some English speakers, let's face it — Spanish language fluency is probably not in the cards. You know who you are.

Pixabay

From Texas Standard:

It wasn't too long ago when Dallas became the epicenter for what many feared could have been the beginning of a nationwide ebola epidemic. Since then, the U.S. government has fought to figure out when and where the next viral epidemic may come from.

Courtesy of Donald E. Davis

From Texas Standard:

Have you ever wondered what happened to the dinosaurs? Well, you’re not the only one.

That’s why an international group of scientists, funded by the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling, are planning to launch an expedition to drill into the Chicxulub crater, a 150-mile wide impact crater buried underneath the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico.

Mackenzie Dunn/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard

T.C. Boyle is no stranger to tackling the taboo in his literature. His more than 20 novels examine every restricted topic in America and have earned him more accolades than many authors would ever dream of receiving. The New York Times raves his latest novel is the best one yet.

The Harder They Come examines the shootings that seem to be taking place nonstop across America. “It seems like there’s one every month now,” Boyle says. The novel takes place in Fort Bragg, California; however, it could be anywhere in the United States.

Maker Movement Takes Off in Texas

Apr 2, 2015
Photo via worldofnovelty.com

Storytelling and authenticity are changing the way consumers choose products.

After a long career in technology, Denny Hamill was ready to retire and take it easy. Then his grandson came to him with a problem: a dog named Prancer.

Gage Skidmore/flickr

From Texas Standard: 

Who will make it to the Final Four – and who will get bounced out?

The NCAA men’s basketball tournament is down to the final four. It kicked off two weeks ago when 64 teams began competing to represent their region in the finals. And just like that tournament, the announcement by Texas Senator Ted Cruz tipped off the race for the GOP nomination for president.

flickr.com/arcaist

For most Texans, spring time gives us a small window of opportunity to trek outside in some bearable weather. It's almost become a tradition for Texans to use this precious time to take photos in patches of bluebonnets. But just as we humans are beginning to shake off winter and go outside into the sun, so are are the snakes.

Anyone who's spent a significant time in the southwest can tell you, snake bites are a real danger. So what do you do if you encounter one?

flickr.com/enriquecespedes

It's no shock that the increased tension in the Middle East has made it tough for Western journalists to cover stories there. That trek didn’t deter Austin Tice, a former Marine from Houston turned freelance journalist, who went to Syria to cover the ongoing civil war. Now, Tice finds himself in trouble.

ISIS Now Doxxing Members of US Military

Mar 24, 2015
Harry Brexel/US Air Force

Doxxing — derived from the word 'documents' — is a common tactic used by online hacktivist groups such as Anonymous, wherein personally identifiable information about targets is posted on the internet. Over the weekend, about 100 U.S. military servicemen and women were doxxed by the group that calls itself the Islamic State.

The posting included soldiers' names, addresses, photos and other information, and it asked sympathizers to, "Kill them in their own lands, behead them in their own homes, stab them to death as they walk their streets thinking that they are safe."

Texas Leads the Push Against Obama's Immigration Action

Mar 24, 2015
Callie Richmond/Texas Tribune

From The Texas Standard:

After a federal judge in Brownsville ruled to temporarily block the president's executive order on immigration in February, 25 other states signed on to the lawsuit.

The 26-state coalition, led by Texas, claims the Obama administration's actions were unconstitutional in that they represent an overreach by the executive and impose an "undue burden" on the state.

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A Headline from the Dallas Morning News on Thursday read, "Irving high school teacher accused of having a romantic relationship with student, police say."

It might be a shocking headline, but it's sadly not a rare one. Texas leads all other states in the number of cases of teachers charged with or found guilty of inappropriate sexual relationships with students.

Brenda Salinas/KUT

Farrah Akhtar says there's no such thing as getting a quick sari.

“No, no, no, you want to try everything on, then you need the jewelry, the shoes, and then you want to bargain, and then you might not be happy with the deal, so you’ll go somewhere else," Akhtar says.

Texas Lawmaker Wants to Make It Illegal to Film Police

Mar 18, 2015
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State Rep. Jason Villalba (R-Dallas) introduced a bill that restricts private citizens from videotaping or photographing law enforcement within 25 feet.

 

Cody Rea for Texas Standard.

From Texas Standard:

The SXSW Film Conference marks a sort of homecoming for MacArthur genius and Oscar-nominated filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer.

Oppenheimer’s 2012 film, The Act of Killing, looks at how the perpetrators of Indonesia’s military coup cope with their past. His new documentary, The Look of Silence, follows victims of the coup and how they continue to live alongside the people who killed their family members.

google.com/ideas/projects/constitute

From Texas Standard

On average there are about a dozen ongoing civil wars across the world. Most of the news coverage of these conflicts revolves around political and military action, but what happens when that dictator or president is overthrown? What happens when a country has to restart anew and a new constitution has to be drafted?

Well, there’s an app for that.

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