Texas Standard

In the 21st century, what happens in Texas drives the American narrative.  Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines. Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions. A one-hour daily news magazine, Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States. Visit TexasStandard.org to read our newest stories and hear our latest show.   

Weather Puts 'American Sniper' Trial on Ice

Image via Flickr/Rachel Johnson (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The next military conflict might not start with a bomb, but with a blackout.

National security experts have long warned that the United States’ infrastructure was vulnerable to hackers abroad. A few high profile cases have made headlines in recent years. In 2012 and 2013, Russian hackers were able to get into the U.S. public utilities and power generators to send and receive encrypted messages.

 


Image via Flickr/Adam Barhan (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

If you attended the Texas Craft Brewers festival earlier this year, you saw the work of more than 60 of those craft brewers. It was an opportunity for these breweries to get their brands and their beers in front of the drinking public because many haven’t been around for very long.

Image via Flickr/MSC U13 (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Soccer star Abby Wambach suited up for the last time as a member of the US women's national team last night. Wambach ends her career with 184 goals scored in international play. That's the most by any player, man or woman: Two Olympic gold medals and a World Cup. Her accomplishments led some, including the President, to call her the GOAT – the Greatest Of All Time.

Image via Dallas Municipal Archives

From Texas Standard:

There is no doubt about it – America is in need of infrastructure repair. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers’ latest infrastructure report card, U.S. infrastructure was given a D+ and the country’s crumbling levee and dam system was noted in particular.

That danger is more apparent than ever for the over 400,000 people living downstream from the Lewisville Lake Dam in North Texas. Engineers are saying that dam is a ticking time bomb if nothing is to prevent its breach.

 


Image via Flickr/Texas Military Department (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The surge in immigrant children has prompted Gov. Greg Abbott to extend National Guard deployments at the Texas border. Paul Weber, a reporter covering the story for the Associated Press, says while the exact number of troops is unknown, it’s probably in the low hundreds.

“In December of 2014 when Gov. Perry first deployed the National Guard to the border, he sent up to 1,000 troops,” Weber says. “But as recently as February, state officials said that there's now only about 200 troops there. And that was in anticipation of an expected drawdown to eventually get the troops out of there.”

 


Here's An Apple Pie Recipe For Any Texan Holiday

Dec 16, 2015
Image via Flickr/Steven Depolo (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Every Christmas my mom would bake eight pies: four apple and four pecan. Now, we wouldn’t eat all of those ourselves. Two would be given away to pie-less people and two would be placed in the deep freeze for some emergency of the future. Pies and money were similar in my mom’s mind. Save a fourth of everything in deep savings for some future need.

When baking these pies, she had a quite a memorable ritual she followed.

 


Image Courtesy via Linda Gonzalez and Henry Christopher ZH

From Texas Standard:

Dripping Springs has called itself the "Wedding Capital of Texas." But what does that really mean when there are more single adults in the United States than married ones? Moreover, what does it mean when the state is in the middle of a wedding bust?

Image via YouTube

From Texas Standard:

The last of the 2015 Republican presidential debates is slated for Tuesday. It's the first debates since GOP candidate Donald Trump declared Muslims should be prohibited from entering the United States. It also comes after John Podesta, Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign chair, told donors that his prediction for the 2016 race would be a contest between Clinton and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.

Image via Flickr/Texas.713 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard: After the Sandy Hook shooting, President Obama and his colleagues in Congress pushed to close what they call a loophole in background checks. They were not successful. The word loophole, it should be noted, is a political term, primarily used by advocates of gun control who say there's a gap in the law when it comes to the sale or transfer of guns between private citizens.

Image via Pixabay (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard: It's something that we do regularly, or should, to help keep up our health. Most would never imagine it to be a matter of life and death, but then again a visit to the dentist almost never is. As unreal as it sounds, deadly dentistry is more common that one might think.

Image via Joy Diaz/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Satsuki Ina is furious that the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services would even consider the possibility of licensing immigrant family detention facilities as childcare centers.

"It's like putting lipstick on a pig," she says.

 

    

Image via Flickr/David Boté Estrada (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Anyone who eats barbecue in Texas has been there: stand in line, order your meat – meat that many have raised to an art if not a religion. When the meal is slapped on the counter, you get this question: bread or crackers? There's an option that rarely comes up in barbecue joints: tortillas.

Where there’s smoke, there’s Daniel Vaughn, Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor. He points out that there’ve been tortillas in Texas for centuries so why aren’t they on the 'cue menu?

 


Image via Pexels (CC0)

From Texas Standard:

About one million Texans get health insurance through exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Texans account for one-tenth of all Americans insured through the exchanges, a total of 10 million new customers and $84 billion in additional revenue for insurers.

 


Image via YouTube/Sharon Garcia

From Texas Standard:

With the presidential election just over the horizon, many politicians are looking for ways to connect with their constituents.

For some it's talking about the economy or healthcare, for others it's the war on terrorism. But when interacting with a demographic that that may not resemble their base, some politicians turn toward pandering.

We've all seen it. You may recall President Obama adding a bit more twang in his speeches when he visits the South. But what about pandering to largest minority group in the U.S. – Spanish-speakers in America?

 


Image courtesy Roy's Boys, LLC

From Texas Standard: In West Texas, it’s not just the landscape that's long and lonely – the days and nights are too.

The late musician Roy Orbison once described his youth in Wink, Texas, as football, oil fields, grease and sand. At night, when the sky would light up like Christmas, Roy would grab his guitar, sit in in the family car, and sing. It was a way to fill all that empty space, he once said. The car wasn't big enough to contain the voice of a man who would one day become known the world over as the “Caruso of rock.”

 


Image via Flickr/Lars Plougmann (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard: 

During President Obama's Oval Office speech on Sunday evening, he laid out two gun control measures he wanted Congress to act on, one of them dealt with the nation's no-fly list.

"To begin with, Congress would have to make sure no one who's on a no-fly list would be able to buy a gun," Obama said in his televised address. "What could possibly be the argument for allowing a terrorist suspect to buy a semi-automatic weapon? This is a matter of national security."

But many, including the ACLU, have concerns about tying the no-fly list to a database for firearm purchases.

 


Image via Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Sunday, December 6 – a day before the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack – is no date that will live in infamy. But it may be remembered by historians as the date the 44th U.S. President tried to allay the growing fears of a nation and talk tough against terror.


Photo via Office of the Texas Attorney General

From Texas Standard:

Gov. Greg Abbott used to joke when he was attorney general that he'd get up in the morning, go to work, sue the Obama Administration and then go home.  He’d wake up and do the same thing the next day.

The latest Texas suit by current attorney general Ken Paxton against the Obama Administration is not what you might describe as an everyday lawsuit. Indeed, newspapers across the country have taken note of Texas' decision to sue the Federal government over its plans to resettle Syrian refugees.

 


Image via Joy Diaz/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Just a month ago, service providers in Texas were gearing up to receive some of the estimated 10,000 Syrian refugees scheduled to arrive in the United States in 2016. Last month's terrorist attacks in Paris raised caution flags for many state governors, including Gov. Greg Abbott.


Image via Flickr/Oliver Townend (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has been in Cuba this week talking trade. He arrived in Havana on Monday with a delegation of 25 people to explore business opportunities between the formerly embargoed country and the Lone Star State.

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