Texas Standard

In the 21st century, what happens in Texas drives the American narrative.  Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines. Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions. A one-hour daily news magazine, Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States. Visit TexasStandard.org to read our newest stories and hear our latest show.   

Weather Puts 'American Sniper' Trial on Ice

Image via Flickr/Andrew Scott (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard

Only 32 percent of federal district court judges and 35 percent of federal appeals judges are female, according to the National Women's Law Center.

Image via Flickr/Mark Robinson (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard: 

Everywhere you go these days, you see services for pets and pet owners. From pet sweaters to pet spas, the American pet industry is a $60 billion business – that’s almost double what it was just over a decade ago.

Image courtesy Jeff Gillis, savesandy.org

From Texas Standard: 

Tuesday, China's president arrives in the U.S. for a high-level state visit. President Xi Jinping's first stop is Seattle, and he'll be in Washington to meet President Obama at the end of the week.

Benhur Arcayan/Wikimedia Commons

From Texas Standard:

It's been almost 30 years since Lidia Guerrero last embraced her son in Argentina. Back then, her teenager Victor Saldano was a teenager. He left home, telling her "he wanted to see the world."

Image via Flickr/Ellen Macdonald (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Image via Flickr/Rob Best (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Despite a war, changes to the Constitution and to state and federal laws, slavery continues to be very much a part of the American story. We've seen it echoed in the controversies around the use of police power and the consistent iconography of the confederacy.

But much of what we know about the first-hand experiences of slaves themselves comes from written accounts – transcribed interviews done in the 1930s using stereotyped misspellings.

Catholic Church of England and Wales/flickr

From Texas Standard:

One of the first things we do each morning – in the wee small hours – is check in on the top stories our colleagues are talking about here in Texas, across the country, and around the world. 

Texas 'Rambler' Joe Ely Can't Be Pinned Down

Sep 18, 2015
Image via Flickr/Eric Frommer (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The argument could be made that what Larry McMurtry is to Texas letters, Joe Ely is to Texas music.

The characters that live in his songs run the gambit from lowlifes to the larger-than-life. Over the years, Ely has worked with the Clash to Linda Ronstadt to Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Tweedy, Lyle Lovett – truth be known, countless others.

Screenshot via CNN

From the Texas Standard: The second GOP debate is one for the history books. Last night's primetime event had some standout moments – a few fireworks, perhaps. It also seemed to be somewhat of a contest in stamina, since the main event lasted three hours. Just in case you didn't make it all the way through Jennifer Mercieca, communications professor at Texas A&M, has got us covered.

Twitter/Ahmed Mohammed

Ahmed Mohamed is a 14-year-old who loves tinkering with electronics. On Monday, he brought a homemade clock to school. After he showed it to a few of his teachers, the clock was confiscated. Ahmed was then questioned by police and taken to a juvenile detention facility in handcuffs – accused of making a hoax bomb. He was wearing his NASA t-shirt at the time he was arrested.

Image via Flickr/Paul Townsend (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It's been 121 days since the so-called biker gang shootout in Waco. Despite nine deaths and a mass arrest of 177 people – each held for days or weeks on $1 million bonds – there have been exactly zero formal charges brought against anyone. Nor has any evidence been offered to support the arrests. And there's been no word whatsoever on whether (or when) cases might be presented to a grand jury, which is currently led by a Waco police detective.

Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard

An estimated 20,000 people packed into the American Airlines Center Monday night to see Donald Trump live in Dallas, Texas.

Image via Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

George P. Bush has been taking an active role in his father's GOP campaign. But has it been negatively affecting his role as the General Land Commissioner?

Just over six months into his term as Texas Land Commissioner, George P. Bush has been hard at work ... campaigning for his dad.

Bush ran for his current position on a commitment to "reboot" the General Land Office. But he's drawn new headlines recently over how much time he hasn't been at work, despite active initiatives to institute a new management structure and return the agency to zero-based budgeting.

Brian M. Rosenthal, state bureau reporter for the Houston Chronicle, tells the Standard that based on the land commissioner's calendar, George P. Bush was off of work 23 out of the 50 days since his father Jeb Bush announced his run for president.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. Government Work)/flickr

From Texas Standard:

It's been called the checkpoint of the stars: Willie Nelson, Snoop Dogg and Fiona Apple have all been snagged at the Sierra Blanca Border Patrol checkpoint.

Musicians and other celebrities have been booked and charged for marijuana possession by Hudspeth County Sheriff Arvin West. But West now seems to be saying his days of cracking down on every joint and baggie may be over.

NPR Southwest Correspondent John Burnett just returned to Austin from West Texas, where he checked out that checkpoint.

"I wasn't holding. They passed me right through," Burnett says, for the record.

But what if Burnett had been carrying a personal amount of marijuana?

From Texas Standard:

Picture this: A prominent Republican speaks at one of the country's most liberal enclaves, The University of California at Berkeley. Not only is it a full house, he gets a standing ovation.

Image via Flickr/Mark Taylor (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Tuesday it was the iconic song from Rocky – “Eye of the Tiger” – used at the Kim Davis and Mike Huckabee rally.

Image via Texas Observer, courtesy Progreso ISD

From Texas Standard:

A "systematic breakdown" is how a recent report from the Texas Education Agency described the Progreso School District.

Flickr/Anita Gould (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

We talk a lot about how the trajectory of the nation turned in the months and years that followed September 11, 2001. One of the many lives that took a turn that day was that of David Peters.

He was a former Marine who reenlisted as an Army chaplain after 9/11. Peters was attached to a combat unit on the ground in Iraq and then served as a chaplain at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in New York. Although he now works and lives in Austin and the surrounding area, on September 11, 2015, Father Peters will return to New York. He’ll be giving a sermon at St. Paul’s Chapel near ground zero.

Courtesy of Abdulrahman Zetoun

From Texas Standard:  

Of the millions displaced by the Syrian civil war and the atrocities committed by ISIS terrorists, hundreds of those trying to escape the violence have ended up here, in Texas.

One of those individuals, Abdulrahman Zetoun, arrived in America back in January. In Syria, life was riddled with violence.

"We used to wake up and sleep with the sounds of bombs and explosions and machine guns," Zetoun says. "To see every day dead bodies and injured peoples on the sides of the roads."

Daily news show serves as platform for connecting stories of Texas

AUSTIN, Texas – Sept. 9, 2015 – “Texas Standard,” the national daily news show of Texas, has hit the six-month milestone of connecting Texans to stories around the state through expansive coverage of politics, the environment, lifestyle, culture, technology and business — from a distinctly Texas perspective.