Texas Standard

In the 21st century, what happens in Texas drives the American narrative.  Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines. Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions. A one-hour daily news magazine, Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States. Visit TexasStandard.org to read our newest stories and hear our latest show.   

Weather Puts 'American Sniper' Trial on Ice

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From Texas Standard:

Following another legal setback to President Barack Obama's immigration executive action, the Justice Department says it plans to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the lawsuit.

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From Texas Standard:

Most adoptions are about children finding their "forever homes," or their permanent families. Other adoption proceedings are for parents who want to make sure their kid remains a part of their family, as is the case for many same-sex parents.

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From Texas Standard:

Earlier this year, when Texas' 84th Legislative Session was just shifting into gear, Gov. Greg Abbott was urging sweeping ethics reform. He characterized government transparency as the most important commodity to bolster the bond of trust between lawmakers and the people. Despite the promises, not much changed last session.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Center for Public Integrity released a new scorecard for what it's calling "state integrity." Out of all 50 states tested, Texas didn't do so well. The Lone Star state got a "D-" grade, putting us as number 38 on their public integrity meter.

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From Texas Standard:

There have been a lot of non-Texans talking about the southern border lately. Presidential hopefuls, public officials and others seem to all have opinions on what's wrong with border security and how to fix it.

Take, for instance, talk-show host Sean Hannity. "[We need] virtual fences, virtual surveillance – impenetrable border," he says.


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From Texas Standard:

Earlier this year Pastor Gonzalez Sosa was pulled over for speeding in Caldwell County. Dash-cam audio from that traffic stop indicates both drivers spoke in Spanish during the stop.

Sosa was issued a citation, but his race was recorded as white.


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From Texas Standard:

Almost 200 Americans have tried to leave the U.S. to join Islamic extremists in Iraq and Syria.

The Federal Bureau of Investigations made that claim this summer at a Senate intelligence committee hearing. Texas has a seen its fair share of individuals attempting to join ISIS; in the last year, the federal government sentenced two men from Austin who were caught trying to join the group.


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From Texas Standard:

The Texas legislature meets for 140 days every two years, but lawmakers are already starting to get to work. In 14 months, the 85th legislative session begins. Both Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Speaker of the House Joe Straus have given legislators some homework before the start of the session. These interim charges suggest in-depth studies of what top state officials think are the most important issues for the next legislative session.

Image via Wikimedia/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

Earlier this month, Gov. Greg Abbott warned Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez that he’d “no longer tolerate” Texas sheriff offices that don’t comply with federal immigration authorities on detainer requests. Yesterday Abbott made good on his threat: he says the state will withhold grant funding from any counties that refuse to cooperate with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Valdez has caught flak for saying she would begin making case-by-case decisions on whether to honor ICE requests for detainment. The requests ask county jails to hold undocumented immigrants with criminal records for up to 48 hours longer than their set release time so officials can take them into custody.


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From Texas Standard:

On Monday President Barack Obama made the call to "ban the box" for federal job applicants with prison records so that they are given a chance to get through the door.

The box in question is the check box on job applications asking applicants if they have ever been convicted of a crime.


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From Texas Standard:

The longest state constitution in the nation is about to get longer. Texan voters passed all seven proposed amendments to the constitution.

One amendment aims to fix a problem most all Texans are familiar with: transportation. The state's growing population might be good for the economy, but hasn't done the roadways many favors.

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From Texas Standard:

While it's no longer news that some law enforcement officers abuse the power that comes with the badge, the numbers revealed in a new Associated Press report are shocking: a thousand officers lost their badges in a six-year period for rape, sexual assault, possession of child pornography and propositioning citizens. In his investigation, reporter Matt Sedensky found that the reported rate is much lower than what's actually happening.

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From Texas Standard

The healthcare marketplace is open once again, but if you look closely at the offered insurance plans you might find something lacking: coverage for specialized treatments.

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From Texas Standard:

Tuesday, Nov. 3 is voting day. The good news: according to preliminary numbers, more Texans are voting in this off-year than have voted in nearly a decade. The bad news: seven constitutional amendments, that will affect everyone, may still be decided by six out of every 100 Texans.

Texans have until 7 p.m. to vote. If you didn't already cast your ballot during early voting, we have a crash course for you in the proposed amendments. KUT Austin political reporter Ben Philpott has the details.

Image via Flickr/U.S. Customs and Border Protection (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

The world is in the midst of the largest displacement of human beings since World War II. The images of the people leaving their country in makeshift rafts are the images of Syrians.

Not too long ago, it was Cubans who were braving the ocean. Not anymore.


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From Texas Standard:

Earlier this year, Texas made headlines when they passed a bill that would move $1 billion of gold bullion being stored in New York to Texas.

Gov. Greg Abbott released a statement upon signing the bill into law, saying that Texas would work to store the gold into a secure facility. 

In it, Abbott said the Texas Bullion Depository, the "first state-level facility of its kind in the nation,” will keep taxpayer funds from leaving the state through fees for storing gold outside our borders and increase "the security and stability of our gold reserves.”


Image via Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Call it a commingling of the sacred and a spectacle.

Halloween "Texas style" starts Friday and goes through Monday with Día de los Muertos and All Souls Day in between.

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From Texas Standard:

Yik Yak is making headlines for all the wrong reasons. A few days ago a student at Texas A&M yakked: "Don't go to campus... this will be my only warning." Officials filed an emergency subpoena to track down the poster, who was arrested for making terrorist threats.

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From Texas Standard:

Municipal elections in presidential off-years usually don't attract too much attention. But the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (HERO) is the exception to that rule.

Proposition 1 on Houston voters' ballots, HERO, derisively known as the "bathroom ordinance," is getting a lot of national attention.


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From Texas Standard:

Yesterday, a new undercover video was released by the anti-abortion group targeting Planned Parenthood. Shot in Austin, the video shows a doctor describing methods used to perform later-term abortions.

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From Texas Standard: 

The World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer announced yesterday that processed meats are "carcinogenic to humans," meaning their consumption can cause cancer.