technology

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Human attempts to control the weather go back millennia.

There was fire, of course, for keeping warm when winter's cold takes hold, but taming the sweltering heat of the summer is a much newer pursuit. 

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News.

From Texas Standard.

Tech transformations can have such a dramatic effect on the course of your day that it’s hard to remember your life before the latest gadget. When was the last time you used a paper map when your phone died or lost service? Though he admits his own sense of direction is lacking, Bill Kilday, in his new book, Never Lost Again, tells the story of how a small Texas tech startup named Keyhole eventually became Google Maps as we know it.

David Schott/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

It probably isn’t a surprise that your cell phone company knows a lot about you, including where you are right now and where you were last night. The phone company doesn’t really care where you were last night. But the police might, if they think you could be involved in a crime, they can scoop up your location data after the fact. But how would it feel to know that phone carriers are passing your location data on to third parties, and that you can’t opt out of that sharing?

Blind Students Learn To Code With A Swipe And A Tap

Mar 9, 2018
Austin Price/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

Tech companies say the U.S. needs more and more workers with computer coding skills. There’s also a severe unemployment problem among people with disabilities. A program created last year by Apple to encourage all kids to learn to code is now entering the lives of some Texas students with visual disabilities.

Not everyone who learns to program will make a career of doing it, but for a blind kid who gets the coding bug, having an accessible way to write software could be a start toward filling those job gaps.

Yuri Samoilov/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Multiple school districts in north and northeast Texas were notified by the Texas Department of Agriculture recently that they were likely exposed to a data breach. The warning estimates that personal information of some 700 students across 39 districts could have been leaked when an employee’s state-issued laptop was hit with a ransomware attack.

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