Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

The second weekend of the Austin City Limits Festival is upon us.

If you don’t go to ACL, you may just view the two-weekend music event as a headache that consumes a lot city attention and resources. But, the thousands of visitors it brings to the city pump millions of dollars into the Austin economy – $194 million last year, according to C3 Presents. 

SXSW: Episode Thirteen from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

Zee and Milo, the brains behind From The Airport (FTA) met at a friend's underground studio in Seoul in 2010 and have since collaborated to create a unique mix of energizing distortions, dance beats, melodies, and moving lyrics. Milo (producing, guitar, bass, keys, vocals) and Zee (producing, DJ, drums, keys, vocals) both have roots in film, Zee as a screenwriter and Milo as a film composer. We spoke about their obsession with films, what inspires them as musicians, their time in the Korean Army, and what American bands influenced them growing up as kids in S. Korea.

SXSW: Episode Twelve from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

Korean American Daniel Park (aka DPD) is a director and producer. His film Ktown Cowboys made its world premiere at the SXSW Film Festival. He started his music, news and publishing agency, Transparent Agency, along with electro-hop band Far East Movement. Together they manage artists April Nhem, Bye Felicia, Dustin Lenji, Paul Mason, Rell The Soundbender, and Yultron. He sat down with us during KPop Meet Up @Blackheart to talk about the KPop wave, why the computer is a musical instrument, and how DJs are artists too.

SXSW: Episode Eleven from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

The Daily Buzz caught up with Korean rock, electronic and indie band HEO in the hallway of the Majestic on 6th Street during SXSW just prior to their performance. We spoke with HEO's Kim Bo Yeong (vocals, keyboard, and bass), K (guitar and sound engineer) and Kim Geonjae (drums).

SXSW: Episode Ten from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

The Daily Buzz caught up with the winners of the 2015 Korean Music Awards Rock Song Of The Year Asian Chairshot after their performance at KPop Night Out at the Elysium. This psychedelic garage rock band group consists of a talented trio: drummer Pak Gye Wan, guitarist Sohn Hee Nam, and bassist and vocalist Hwang Yong Won. Others have compared their sound to Black Sabbath, Soundgarden and Radiohead.

Find out during our interview how they met Jeff Schroeder of Smashing Pumpkins, how they convinced him to produce their album, and why it's important to never give up.

SXSW: Episode Nine from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

Singer-songwriter Bobby Choy is no stranger to SXSW. This graduate of NYC's School of Performing Arts returns to the festival for a second time this year doing double duty as an artist in both the film and music portions. He had a lead role in Ktown Cowboys, which made its world premiere in Austin at SXSW. The film, based on the successful web series of the same name, follows a group of childhood friends who spend their free time in Los Angeles' Koreatown (aka Ktown).

SXSW: Episode Eight from The Daily Buzz

Mar 25, 2015

The Daily Buzz spoke to The Barberettes, a retro Korean female trio made up of three vocalists: Shinae An Wheeler, Grace Kim and So Hee Park, at SXSW during the Music portion of the festival. Specializing in harmony, this very stylish doo wop group takes us back in time with their nostalgic interpretations of hits from the 1950s and 1960s such as "Be My Baby" by the Ronettes and "Barbara Ann" by the Beach Boys. They call themselves the "Time Traveling Girl Group" and have inspired a new wave of fashion followers with their dapper outfits and picture perfect hair and makeup.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

You might be surprised to hear that Sweden is the world’s third biggest exporter of music. ABBA, Ace of Base, and the guy who invented Spotify are all Swedes.

And when Swedish musicians travel outside their country, one of their first stops is South by Southwest.

But what makes Swedish music so popular?

Bernardo Ruiz

This story comes from Texas Standard.

A documentary at SXSW – “Kingdom of Shadows” – forces us to look at the ongoing violence south of the Texas-Mexico border.

The film is told through three people – a Mexican nun working to find answers about tens of thousands of disappearances, a U.S. drug enforcement agent and a former Texas drug smuggler. Bernardo Ruiz directed the film.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

At South by Southwest Music you can hear everything from metal and rock to hip hop and electronic music.

Dozens of genres – but for the most part, they all have one very basic thing in common.

If you’re a musician, it might sound familiar to you:
The musical note A, above middle C, equals 440 hertz.

It’s the basis of virtually every piece of music you’ll hear today. And probably every piece of music you have ever heard, with a few exceptions.

It’s called reference pitch or concert pitch. It’s the note that every other note is based on.

Take a listen:

Every instrument in Western music – more or less – is tuned to this standard.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

This year's South by Southwest Music festival features more than 900 bands – not counting those who play impromptu shows in clubs and houses and on the streets – and as usual, it's drawn swarms of visitors to Austin. KUT/KUTX photographers and multimedia producers are out in the field, capturing images of musicians, crowds and workers.

Click through the photos above for a slideshow.

Nathan Bernier, KUT News

Maybe you didn't RSVP to the events, or maybe you didn't buy an $895 music badge or a $189 wristband, or maybe you hate lines, but you still want a taste of Austin's largest annual assembly of live music? There are options.

Fader Fort is livestreaming four days of live music performances in ultrahigh definition. Dell is organizing the technology and says it's the first time a concert has been livestreamed online in 4K.

"You're going from HD to basically four HD-sized screens, so you're quadrupling the detail," Dell's Scott Hamilton says of 4K technology. "This just takes it to the next level."

Austin History Center

Today marks the beginning of SXSW Music — the final stretch of the three-headed chimera of a festival that draws in droves of music-loving revelers and fills the streets of downtown Austin with both music and traffic.

The Jones Family Singers is made up in part of five sisters, two brothers and their father. The gospel music band is based in Bay City, Texas – outside of Houston.

For the last several decades, the Jones Family Singers have been touring churches and winning singing competitions. But it wasn’t until recently that the group started getting some real attention.

That’s thanks in major part to music critic Michael Corcoran. Austin-based Arts and Labor produced an album last year. And now, their story is being told in a film getting its world premiere at South by Southwest: The Jones Family Will Make a Way.

Cody Rea for Texas Standard.

From Texas Standard:

The SXSW Film Conference marks a sort of homecoming for MacArthur genius and Oscar-nominated filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer.

Oppenheimer’s 2012 film, The Act of Killing, looks at how the perpetrators of Indonesia’s military coup cope with their past. His new documentary, The Look of Silence, follows victims of the coup and how they continue to live alongside the people who killed their family members.

Cody Rea for Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Robert Rodriguez is one of Texas’ most high-profile contemporary filmmakers — best known for Sin City, Spy Kids and From Dusk Till Dawn among other films. So, why has he set up a temporary art museum in Austin?

Rodriguez has taken over a space near the Capitol and has lined the exposed brick walls with framed work by fantasy artist Frank Frazetta.

Rodriguez says when he was a kid growing up in San Antonio, he devoured Frazetta’s work – which showed up on the covers of comic books and paperbacks including "Conan the Barbarian," "Tarzan" and "The Death Dealer." Some of the art in the downtown space once even hung on his bedroom wall.

Micah Magee, Petting Zoo

Filmmaker Micah Magee has been all over the world – but just wanted to capture the Lone Star State in her SXSW Film "Petting Zoo."

Micah Magee directed "Petting Zoo." It's making its North American premiere at SXSW.

"When I was in film school in Berlin I’d go like sit in the cactus section at the biological gardens because I missed the way it smelled so much and you can’t really get smells to be in a film," Magee says. "So I had to find the ways to have that feeling of really being there that I really missed so much. I wanted to like transport that to everywhere else in the world where the film could and, hopefully, would go."

Daniel X O'Neill/Flickr

Just before the SXSW onslaught, Lyft has agreed to a deal making it the first ridesharing service allowed at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.

City of Austin

South by Southwest is coming up. That means a crush of visitors and extra cash in the pockets of people renting space to those visitors.  But the City of Austin has a message for potential short-term landlords: You've got to register your home by Feb. 28th if you hope to rent the space legally.

"Before every major event we see a number of applicants that come into our office," says Marcus Elliot with the Austin Code Department. "They're really interested in that last-minute rush to try to get the license."

Nearly two months after the global design and planning company, Populous, released a report saying South by Southwest and the city of Austin could do more to improve public safety and manage growing crowds at the festival, organizers are trying to test out some of the report’s recommendations.

Last Friday, on Halloween, South by Southwest organizers worked with private businesses on Sixth Street to set up three cameras on the street between Brazos and Red River streets. According to the festival organizers, the goal was to monitor crowd activity because Halloween and the first night of Formula 1 would attract crowds similar to those at SXSW.

According to a lawyer with the festival, SXSW believes the city could do more to deal with issues of overcrowding on Sixth street. 

SXSW would not say where exactly the cameras were located.