Super Bowl

Screenshot via @DanHanzus/Twitter

Turns out, Tom Brady can’t have everything.

The New England Patriots’ quarterback cemented his place in NFL history last night – becoming the first quarterback to win five Super Bowls and bringing the Pats back from a historic deficit to defeat the Falcons in the first overtime Super Bowl ever.

But, while Brady was celebrating the team’s win, his jersey was stolen at NRG Stadium in Houston. 

Unless you're a Seahawks fan, this year's Super Bowl was not so super. Seattle's blowout victory over Denver almost certainly inspired more than a few million viewers to tune out shortly after halftime. 

The real contest this year, as in years past, was among TV sponsors who paid approximately $4 million per half-minute to push their messages to viewers.  Much of the post-game commentary was devoted to who won bragging rights for 'best commenrcial'.  But Michael Webber, Deputy Director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin saw much more than the usual ads for beer, soda, insurance and autos.  

Sure, the Super Bowl may be an American ritual.  But if you look a little closer, Webber says, the big game reveals a national obsession bigger than football: an insatiable appetite for energy.

There was a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown.

A last-minute drive that could have won the game for San Francisco.

An MVP performance by Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco.