State Budget

Stuart Seeger, via Houston Public Media

From Texas Standard.

Despite an economy that is reportedly continuing to grow, the state’s budget chief is looking ahead to the next legislative session and warning lawmakers that some bills with hefty price tags are set to come due – and that revenue will be tight.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News.

From Texas Standard:

With the legislative session set to end on May 29, time is running out to pass a state budget, and resolve the avalanche of other bills that are still moving between chambers of the Legislature. And then there are the governor's priority items, some of which are still stuck, because lawmakers can't agree how to pay for them.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

As the legislative session heads into its final six weeks, lawmakers have a lot left to do. They face the task of reconciling budgets passed by the House and Senate into a single document. They must act on the governor’s emergency agenda items. And they’ll need to decide the fate of the more than 6,000 bills filed during the session.

Texas Comptroller/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Since the 1980s, Texas has set aside a portion of state funds specifically to be used when things aren’t so rosy. It seems like an economically prudent move, but now some say the operations of the Economic Stabilization Fund (ESF) – also known as the Rainy Day Fund – make no fiscal sense. Texas State Comptroller Glenn Hegar says it’s time for a change.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera/The Texas Tribune

The Texas Senate unanimously approved a two-year budget on Tuesday that would shift nearly $2 billion in public education costs from the state to local taxpayers.

The Senate's $218 billion document now goes to budget writers in the House for debate.