State Board of Education

Kate Groetzinger

From Texas Standard.

Earlier this month, the Texas State Board of Education rejected a Mexican-American studies textbook, leaving public school teachers without state-approved materials to teach the topic. But that doesn’t mean schools can’t offer ethnic studies courses. In fact, a handful of public schools across the state have elective courses on ethnic studies topics, which are designed by local teachers and administrators with little direction from the state.

dcJohn/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

When it comes to what kids can be taught in Texas public school classrooms, one evergreen issue has persisted: the theory of evolution.

It has been 158 years since Charles Darwin wrote his treatise on the origin of species. He was far from the first to suggest an evolutionary basis for biology, and he was far from the last to assert that evolution is not necessarily incompatible with longstanding religious beliefs.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

The State Board of Education starts to review a months-long process this week to simplify its science curriculum standards, including recommendations to remove some controversial requirements to teach alternate theories to evolution, including creationism.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Textbook publisher Cynthia Dunbar was defending her company’s Mexican-American Heritage book in front of the State Board of Education last week when she made an interesting argument. Historians raised issues with some of the book's content, but Dunbar said that didn’t matter because the school board didn't specify what type of content it wanted.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

After months of protests from historians, teachers and lawmakers, the Texas State Board of Education this morning unanimously rejected a controversial Mexican-American studies textbook that would have been used in public schools.