space

Martin Do Nascimento / KUT

From Texas Standard:

It's been 45 years since astronaut Harrison Schmitt set foot on the moon as part of the Apollo 17 mission – and no one's done it since.

If the president gets his way, that will change. Earlier this week, President Donald Trump issued a new space policy directive, with the goal of returning humans to the moon. So why go back after such a long absence?

NASA

An associate professor of astronomy at UT-Austin will lead a study using the powerful successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The $8 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is expected to launch in 2019, is said to be 100 times better than the Hubble. It will have a much larger telescope mirror, allowing scientists to see much fainter objects in greater detail.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Austin may not be in best spot to see the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, but there will be a show, nonetheless.

The visible path of the total eclipse runs diagonally across the U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina — well to our north — but we’ll still see about 65 percent of the sun obscured by the moon at its peak.

The eclipse will begin in Austin at around 11:41 a.m., reach its maximum at about 1:10 p.m. and then be completely over by 2:39 p.m.

The SpaceX complex at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
Bill VanderMolen/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It’s a bird. It’s a plane. It’s a space shuttle filled with tourists?

While that idea sounds like science fiction, the reality of sending tourists to space is right around the corner – at least if you believe Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. He recently announced that Blue Origin, his private space company, could begin flying private citizens to the edge of the atmosphere by next year.

On This week’s program, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr speaks with Margot Lee Shetterly, author of ‘Hidden Figures: The American Dream And The Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Help Win the Space Race.’

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