senior citizens

Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Texas is at the epicenter of an aging boom. Texans are getting older, but older folks from other parts of the country are also moving here. With age comes failing health, and an increased need for assistance with performing daily living tasks at home. Many people with physical disabilities also need this kind of assistance. And the people who provide attendant care in Texas are among the lowest-paid in the nationOnly Mississippi pays less.

Did we mention Texas also has some of the most expensive cities to live in?

 

Photo by Jack Plunkett/Feature Photo Service for IBM

These days, many Americans would prefer to “age in place” – or stay in their home as long as they can live safely, independently and comfortably. How long will depend on each individual, but there’s a lab in Austin hoping to extend the timeline for all of us – with robots.

Austin Adopts Plan To Be More 'Age-Friendly'

Nov 4, 2016
flickr/pgoyette

You may think of Austin as a relatively young city, but within the next 25 years, one in five residents are expected to be 65 or older. To prepare for those changes, the Austin City Council has approved a new plan to make it easier for older residents to “age in place."

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

State lawmakers are set to hear testimony this morning on how to address affordable housing needs throughout Texas.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

As James Maxwell tells it, the first journey nearly broke him. “I almost gave up bike riding,” he said. “These are something else.”

Maxwell, 68, stares down a line of five glossy, red tricycles. While at the moment they’re idling in the rear parking lot of East Austin’s Conley-Guerrero Senior Activity Center, later in the morning they’ll hit the road as part of an adult trike-riding program at the senior center. As local nonprofit organizers have pitched it, it’s a chance to bring mobility and activity to some of Austin’s more seasoned and minority residents. 


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