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You might think that whether or not you say yes or no to something is based on logic or reason, but as Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, there are more psychological reasons for your answer than you might think.

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There are so many fascinating aspects of what we remember and what we forget, but one we rarely ask about is what is the point of memorization.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why it's important to store poems, math facts, and more in long-term memory.


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We might think that when we hear or read something we learn it, but that assumption would be incorrect. As Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke point out in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head we have to work to produce ideas in order to really understand them.


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When we are born, we know very little about the world and need to learn in order to survive, hence the propensity for curiosity.

However, some people are just more curious than others, so why is this? In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of curiosity.


https://pixabay.com/en/think-man-curious-thinking-looking-1034159/

When we are ready to get something done we're in "doing" mode, and when we are contemplating what we want to do we are in "thinking" mode.

This seems easy enough to understand. So why do we rush into making decisions that don't turn out to be so great? Or why do we sit on our heels when we should be getting things done?

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about how we can optimize our motivational modes for more effective, and rational decision making.


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Last October, Austin made history under a shroud of secrecy, it seems.

Today, Google’s parent company Alphabet announced its intention to bring driverless cars to the open market in a new endeavor called Waymo – a project that, according to the company, had its first successful, truly driverless test on Austin’s roads. 

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Humans have an innate ability to imagine the unimaginable. More often than not, this manifests in everyday situations – "woulda, coulda, shoulda" sort of situations – like whether you would've been late to that job interview, if you hadn't done x, y or z. Those imaginings are called counterfactuals.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of counterfactuals, and how taking time to recognize and use these tools we have at our disposal can make us happier and healthier people.

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People don't feel that great when their locus of control is compromised, and that's pretty much what bullying is all about. So why does bullying exist and how does it function?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of bullying.


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We might think that human beings are innately kind or innately cruel, as it turns out neither is fully true. Kindness is one of those things that is a learned behavior. The more we practice kindness the more we, and others around us, tend to practice the same behavior.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of kindness.


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If you live in the modern world – as you most likely do – you’re probably seen it: two people standing next to each other, engrossed in text conversations happening on their mobile devices, while oblivious to each other or anything else happening around them. 

Does that common occurrence make you reminisce about the good old days of landlines? You’re not alone. Many people pine for simplicity in this new world of immediate contact – all possible through our nifty mobile gadgets. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

No matter what party you voted for on Election Day, this election has revealed a lot about the psychology of our country. There is a lot of anger, alienation and fear on both sides, and it will take hard work to recover and move forward.

Jenna VonHofe for KUT

Have we evolved into a nation of extremes? In an election season like this one (as if we've ever seen anything like this) it may seem like there's no middle ground, and there's a reason for that.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why we've become more polarized politically – especially in the last 30 years.

A large space rock came fairly close to Earth on Sunday night. Astronomers knew it wasn't going to hit Earth, thanks in part to a new tool NASA is developing for detecting potentially dangerous asteroids.

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We get it, voting is a choice, one that requires a lot of effort to make an informed decision, and some people just don't put in that effort, or choose not to. So why do some people choose to not go to the polls?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke take on the psychology of voting.

This story was produced in collaboration with the Annette Strauss Institute’s Lebermann Forum.

Credit flickr.com/jvandoor

Time marches on and, whether we like it or not, we age.
With age comes a decline in both physical abilities and mental acuity. Memory and cognition peak in our early twenties, then we begin a slow, steady decline of those functions as we approach our senior years. 

This week on "Two Guys on Your Head," Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke join host Rebecca McInroy to discuss how physical and mental stimuli can help combat the signs and symptoms of old age, stave off memory loss and help you be at your best well into your golden years.

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Texas produces more carbon dioxide than any other state in the country. That’s a problem because CO2 is a big cause of global climate change. But what if the greenhouse gas could be turned into a carbon-neutral fuel source? A group of researchers say they have done just that.


We might consider ourselves pretty savvy. We choose the "best" toothpaste, bottled water, or television set. We go to the movies we "want" to see, and listen to the music we like because it's "good".

What we might not take into consideration is how popularity fits into our value judgments about everything, from people and products to ideas and beliefs.

Scientists in Michigan have found a new dwarf planet in our solar system.

It's about 330 miles across and some 8.5 billion miles from the sun. It takes 1,100 years to complete one orbit.

But one of the most interesting things about the new object, known for the time being as 2014 UZ224, is the way astronomers found it.

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Humans may take the card we swipe for granted at the grocery store when we buy food. We might look at our bank balance and not even think of how unique it is that we can translate those little numbers into experiences and things. It's merely one of the benefits of having big brains.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of how our brains determine value.

Join KUT’s Rebecca McInroy at Views and Brews at The Cactus Cafe, at 6:00pm and 8:00pm Tuesday October 4th, 2016 as KUT's "Two Guys on Your Head," Dr. Art Markman and Dr.

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