same-sex marriage

Tamir Kalifa

After pressure from Texas GOP leadership, the all-Republican Texas Supreme Court on Friday reversed course and agreed to take up a same-sex marriage case.

Robert Couse-Baker/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

On June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled bans on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. But as much of a landmark case as that was, some say it left an open interpretation of that right and its associated rights.

Top Texas officials filed an amicus brief last Thursday with the Texas Supreme Court, asking judges to reconsider a Houston lawsuit from early September. At the heart of the case is whether the affirmation of same-sex marriage across the country also compels public employers to extend benefits to married same-sex couples.

 


Tamir Kalifa/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:

After coming out on the losing end of a United States Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage, Texas Republican leaders are now looking to the Texas Supreme Court to narrow the scope of that landmark ruling.

A Year Later, Gay Marriage Debate Shifts in Texas

Jun 26, 2016
Tamir Kalifa

When Collin Acock became engaged to Shane Parsons in New York in August 2014, the Austin couple anticipated returning to New York to marry the next summer.

When they realized last year that the U.S. Supreme Court could legalize same-sex marriage nationwide in Obergefell v. Hodges, however, the "incredible possibility of us getting married at home in Texas came up," Acock said. They made plans to hold the ceremony immediately if that decision came down. On June 26, 2015, it did, and the couple promptly wed at the Travis County Courthouse.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Everyone needs a copy editor. (Thank you, Susan and Amy and Pam.)

Today, the Texas Republican Party is probably wishing it had one, too.

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