Rick Santorum

Photo by Gage Skidmore via the Texas Tribune

Rick Santorum’s withdrawal today from the 2012 presidential contest makes Texas Republicans, once again, all but irrelevant in their party’s nomination process.

The drawn-out nature of the race had given party activists rare hope that this would be the most competitive presidential primary since 1976, when Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford duked it out in a contest that didn’t end until the party’s convention.

But a legal fight this year over redistricting pushed the Texas primary to May 29 from early March.

Sources say that former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum is abandoning his bid for the Republican Presidential nomination. 

The  New York Times cites two Santorum advisors, who say Santorum will make the announcement in his home state of Pensylvania.

Two of the most important factors during a primary campaign are momentum and math — meaning how many delegates you've got.

What do you do when neither one of those things is running in your favor?

That's a question people are starting to ask about former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum — and have wondered about for a while now about former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Texas Rep. Ron Paul.

The latest reports from the Federal Election Commission shed new light on the political largesse of two Texas businessmen who have become common names in the world of Republican fundraising.

With a $1 million check in February to the superPAC backing Rick Santorum, Dallas nuclear waste dump owner Harold Simmons and his wife, Annette, have now contributed to groups supporting all three of the top GOP candidates.

Ed Kilgore is a special correspondent for The New Republic

New Republic: Is The South Too Much For The GOP?

Mar 13, 2012

Alec MacGillis is a writer for The New Republic

Super Tuesday 2012 is finally here, with Republican presidential preference contests — a mix of primaries and caucuses — occurring in 10 states from sea to shining sea.

While the 2012 race for the GOP nomination likely won't be over by Wednesday morning, it could seem far closer to being so, especially if Mitt Romney sweeps contests everywhere but, say, Georgia, where the former congressman from the Peach State, Newt Gingrich, is expected to have a good night.

New Republic: Super Tuesday Primer

Mar 1, 2012

The New Republic staff composed this article.

Ohio
Delegates at stake: 66

If primaries and caucus victories are still all about media attention and momentum, then, yes, it's critical who wins Michigan's statewide vote Tuesday. All the more so if that winner is not Mitt Romney, who grew up there and whose dad was governor in the 1960s.

But as to collecting actual delegates for the actual GOP nomination? Tuesday's vote in Michigan probably will not matter much at all.

Photo courtesy US Fish and Wildlife

Hardeman County Wins "Hog Out Challenge"

Paul photo courtesy house.gov; Romney photo courtesy Gage Skidmore

After last night’s Republican debate, supporters of Rick Santorum are alleging a cease-fire agreement between former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Rep. Ron Paul.

The British press is even floating the idea Romney may have offered Paul the vice-presidential slot.

Romney and Paul have certainly warmed to each other on the campaign trail. The Washington Post noted so earlier this month:

Despite deep differences on a range of issues, Romney and Paul became friends in 2008, the last time both ran for president. So did their wives, Ann Romney and Carol Paul. The former Massachusetts governor compliments the Texas congressman during debates, praising Paul’s religious faith during the last one, in Jacksonville, Fla. Immediately afterward, as is often the case, the Pauls and the Romneys gravitated toward one another to say hello.

Ten months and a score of debates ago, the Republican Party and a slew of news organizations brought forth on our TV screens a new definition of a presidential nominating process — conceived in targeted marketing and dedicated to the proposition that no number of debates was too many for hardcore conservatives.

Photo courtesy Gage Skidmore, flickr.com/gageskidmore

Support for Santorum Spreading in Texas

Republican presidential contender Rick Santorum has a substantial lead in Texas, according to a recent poll by the University of Texas and the Texas Tribune.

Ed Kilgore is a special correspondent for The New Republic, a blogger for The Washington Monthly, and managing editor of The Democratic Strategist.

With a meager ten percent showing in the Iowa caucuses, Governor Rick Perry says he is returning to Texas to reassess his political campaign. Read our story here and watch his speech here

Here are the latest results from across Iowa. 

  1. Mitt Romney 25% (Declared winner)
  2. Rick Santorum 25%
  3. Ron Paul 21% 
  4. Newt Gingrich 13%
  5. Rick Perry 10%
  6. Michele Bachmann 5%
  7. Jon Huntsman 1%

More.....

New Republic: Could Rick Santorum Win Big?

Jan 3, 2012

Noam Scheiber is a senior editor at The New Republic, where he writes about politics and Obama administration economic policy.

With the Iowa caucuses looming just over the horizon, Governor Perry is swinging hard at Rick Santorum. The former Pennsylvania senator leads the pack among the more socially-conservative GOP presidential candidates.

In this new advertisement, the Perry campaign literally shows pigs in an effort to draw a comparison between pork barrel politics and Santorum’s three-year-old comment on Fox News that “I’ll defend earmarks."  Earmarks are provisions added to bills that direct funds to projects in lawmakers' home districts. 

The ad repeats Santorum's one-second comment six times, each time highlighting an earmarks Santorum put into bills while serving in Congress. Unsettling carnival music plays in the background, while a portrait of President Obama slowly transforms into the face of the former Senator.  

Santorum has rebuffed Perry's attack on earmarks, saying he's "proud" of money he brought back to his state.

Photo by Ben Philpott, KUT News

Texas Governor Rick Perry spent the last two weeks namelessly attacking Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney by telling voters that they didn't need to elect a Washington D.C. or Wall Street insider.

But at this morning's campaign stop in the Iowa town of Washington, the governor focused his attack specifically on former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum. A new CNN/Time poll showed Santorum jumping from sixth place in Iowa to third.